Doing a double take

WhatsOn Jun 29, 2017 by Debra Downey Ancaster News

Somehow it’s not surprising that the exhibit Double Exposure has provided Christine Green with two first-time experiences.

It is not only her first exhibit, but after a 17-year career in photography, it has introduced her to a brand new aspect of the art.

Double Exposure is another part of photography that I never thought I would be involved in — doing a print and entering an exhibition,” said the Ancaster native. “It was another part of photography that I got to put my feet into.”

In celebration of Canada’s 150th birthday, the Carnegie Gallery, Dundas Museum and Archives and Dundas Valley School of Art commissioned 27 local artists to choose an item from the museum’s archival images and respond with an artwork of their own.

Green, a volunteer at the museum, said she was helping archive artifacts when a staff member suggested she consider entering a piece of work into Double Exposure.

The owner/operator of Capture the Moment photography was immediately intrigued by the project. From among 150 different images on the museum’s website, she selected a photograph circa 1900 which depicts the fancily-dressed organizers of a “kermis.”

“The first thing I had to do was get online and figure out what a 'kermis' was,” said Green. “It’s a festival or event that happens in a community, and (in the picture) they are all dressed in their gowns and hats, so I thought, ‘Why don’t I do a Red Hat tea?’”

And so Green’s mission had begun. She first found two co-members of the Royal Rubies of the Red Hat Society who owned vintage clothing, then located a quaint garden area, a wrought iron table and chairs, three-tiered plate, jam and cream pots, cups and saucers and other items to make her efforts look authentic.

Green said she took about 40 different shots of her models, selected the best and used three Adobe Photoshop filters to blur the edges and create an angel type of glow on the image.

“It was so much fun, and we had a ball,” said Green.

A former hairdresser, Green opened her first salon in Ancaster in 1972, then moved her shop to Dundas in the late 1980s. While she still tends to the needs of few clients from her home, she sold her shop, Christine’s Hair Visions, in 2004.

“Photography was always a hobby, then one Christmas, I decided I was getting tired of hair and I wanted to do photography,” said Green.

She took a course at the Dundas Valley School of Art in the late 1990s, followed by four years of nighttime study at Mohawk College.

Kevin Puddister, the Dundas museum’s curator and general manager, said Double Exposure follows in the creative footsteps of two successful Winter Blooms exhibitions, which saw the same three Dundas arts organizations team with Mohawk College’s continuing education floral design program. Budding florists took their inspiration from original artworks and precious artifacts to create stunning fresh floral arrangements.

Double Exposure celebrates the history and creative spirit of Dundas, and it’s an interesting way to look back at our shared history,” said Puddister.

Other participating artists in Double Exposure are Branko Gregov, David Seldon, James Gaulton, John Overmeyer, Joseph Hartman, Pat Wintemute, Paul Simon, Richard Kosydar, Guennadi Kalinine, John MacRae, Lawrence Yanover, Linda Charko, Mark Osborne, Rick McKenzie, Stephan Landers, Steve Hill, Jim Chambers, John Pingree, Keith Sharp, Laura Bromwich, Linda Blackney, Matthew Schonewille, Richard Zazulak, Michael Collins, Moussa Faddoul and Travis Singleton.

The exhibit runs until July 30 at the Carnegie Gallery, 10 King St. W., Dundas Museum and Archives, 139 Park St. W., and Dundas Valley School of Art, 21 Ogilvie St.

Longtime Dundas photographer participates in Canada 150 'Double Exposure'

Exhibit runs at the Carnegie, art school and museum

WhatsOn Jun 29, 2017 by Debra Downey Ancaster News

Somehow it’s not surprising that the exhibit Double Exposure has provided Christine Green with two first-time experiences.

It is not only her first exhibit, but after a 17-year career in photography, it has introduced her to a brand new aspect of the art.

Double Exposure is another part of photography that I never thought I would be involved in — doing a print and entering an exhibition,” said the Ancaster native. “It was another part of photography that I got to put my feet into.”

In celebration of Canada’s 150th birthday, the Carnegie Gallery, Dundas Museum and Archives and Dundas Valley School of Art commissioned 27 local artists to choose an item from the museum’s archival images and respond with an artwork of their own.

"Double Exposure" is another part of photography that I never thought I would be involved in — doing a print and entering an exhibition.

Green, a volunteer at the museum, said she was helping archive artifacts when a staff member suggested she consider entering a piece of work into Double Exposure.

The owner/operator of Capture the Moment photography was immediately intrigued by the project. From among 150 different images on the museum’s website, she selected a photograph circa 1900 which depicts the fancily-dressed organizers of a “kermis.”

“The first thing I had to do was get online and figure out what a 'kermis' was,” said Green. “It’s a festival or event that happens in a community, and (in the picture) they are all dressed in their gowns and hats, so I thought, ‘Why don’t I do a Red Hat tea?’”

And so Green’s mission had begun. She first found two co-members of the Royal Rubies of the Red Hat Society who owned vintage clothing, then located a quaint garden area, a wrought iron table and chairs, three-tiered plate, jam and cream pots, cups and saucers and other items to make her efforts look authentic.

Green said she took about 40 different shots of her models, selected the best and used three Adobe Photoshop filters to blur the edges and create an angel type of glow on the image.

“It was so much fun, and we had a ball,” said Green.

A former hairdresser, Green opened her first salon in Ancaster in 1972, then moved her shop to Dundas in the late 1980s. While she still tends to the needs of few clients from her home, she sold her shop, Christine’s Hair Visions, in 2004.

“Photography was always a hobby, then one Christmas, I decided I was getting tired of hair and I wanted to do photography,” said Green.

She took a course at the Dundas Valley School of Art in the late 1990s, followed by four years of nighttime study at Mohawk College.

Kevin Puddister, the Dundas museum’s curator and general manager, said Double Exposure follows in the creative footsteps of two successful Winter Blooms exhibitions, which saw the same three Dundas arts organizations team with Mohawk College’s continuing education floral design program. Budding florists took their inspiration from original artworks and precious artifacts to create stunning fresh floral arrangements.

Double Exposure celebrates the history and creative spirit of Dundas, and it’s an interesting way to look back at our shared history,” said Puddister.

Other participating artists in Double Exposure are Branko Gregov, David Seldon, James Gaulton, John Overmeyer, Joseph Hartman, Pat Wintemute, Paul Simon, Richard Kosydar, Guennadi Kalinine, John MacRae, Lawrence Yanover, Linda Charko, Mark Osborne, Rick McKenzie, Stephan Landers, Steve Hill, Jim Chambers, John Pingree, Keith Sharp, Laura Bromwich, Linda Blackney, Matthew Schonewille, Richard Zazulak, Michael Collins, Moussa Faddoul and Travis Singleton.

The exhibit runs until July 30 at the Carnegie Gallery, 10 King St. W., Dundas Museum and Archives, 139 Park St. W., and Dundas Valley School of Art, 21 Ogilvie St.

Longtime Dundas photographer participates in Canada 150 'Double Exposure'

Exhibit runs at the Carnegie, art school and museum

WhatsOn Jun 29, 2017 by Debra Downey Ancaster News

Somehow it’s not surprising that the exhibit Double Exposure has provided Christine Green with two first-time experiences.

It is not only her first exhibit, but after a 17-year career in photography, it has introduced her to a brand new aspect of the art.

Double Exposure is another part of photography that I never thought I would be involved in — doing a print and entering an exhibition,” said the Ancaster native. “It was another part of photography that I got to put my feet into.”

In celebration of Canada’s 150th birthday, the Carnegie Gallery, Dundas Museum and Archives and Dundas Valley School of Art commissioned 27 local artists to choose an item from the museum’s archival images and respond with an artwork of their own.

"Double Exposure" is another part of photography that I never thought I would be involved in — doing a print and entering an exhibition.

Green, a volunteer at the museum, said she was helping archive artifacts when a staff member suggested she consider entering a piece of work into Double Exposure.

The owner/operator of Capture the Moment photography was immediately intrigued by the project. From among 150 different images on the museum’s website, she selected a photograph circa 1900 which depicts the fancily-dressed organizers of a “kermis.”

“The first thing I had to do was get online and figure out what a 'kermis' was,” said Green. “It’s a festival or event that happens in a community, and (in the picture) they are all dressed in their gowns and hats, so I thought, ‘Why don’t I do a Red Hat tea?’”

And so Green’s mission had begun. She first found two co-members of the Royal Rubies of the Red Hat Society who owned vintage clothing, then located a quaint garden area, a wrought iron table and chairs, three-tiered plate, jam and cream pots, cups and saucers and other items to make her efforts look authentic.

Green said she took about 40 different shots of her models, selected the best and used three Adobe Photoshop filters to blur the edges and create an angel type of glow on the image.

“It was so much fun, and we had a ball,” said Green.

A former hairdresser, Green opened her first salon in Ancaster in 1972, then moved her shop to Dundas in the late 1980s. While she still tends to the needs of few clients from her home, she sold her shop, Christine’s Hair Visions, in 2004.

“Photography was always a hobby, then one Christmas, I decided I was getting tired of hair and I wanted to do photography,” said Green.

She took a course at the Dundas Valley School of Art in the late 1990s, followed by four years of nighttime study at Mohawk College.

Kevin Puddister, the Dundas museum’s curator and general manager, said Double Exposure follows in the creative footsteps of two successful Winter Blooms exhibitions, which saw the same three Dundas arts organizations team with Mohawk College’s continuing education floral design program. Budding florists took their inspiration from original artworks and precious artifacts to create stunning fresh floral arrangements.

Double Exposure celebrates the history and creative spirit of Dundas, and it’s an interesting way to look back at our shared history,” said Puddister.

Other participating artists in Double Exposure are Branko Gregov, David Seldon, James Gaulton, John Overmeyer, Joseph Hartman, Pat Wintemute, Paul Simon, Richard Kosydar, Guennadi Kalinine, John MacRae, Lawrence Yanover, Linda Charko, Mark Osborne, Rick McKenzie, Stephan Landers, Steve Hill, Jim Chambers, John Pingree, Keith Sharp, Laura Bromwich, Linda Blackney, Matthew Schonewille, Richard Zazulak, Michael Collins, Moussa Faddoul and Travis Singleton.

The exhibit runs until July 30 at the Carnegie Gallery, 10 King St. W., Dundas Museum and Archives, 139 Park St. W., and Dundas Valley School of Art, 21 Ogilvie St.