Hana Rotchild’s Vulva Imprints Project on display at Hamilton’s You Me Gallery

WhatsOn Mar 02, 2017 by Debra Downey Ancaster News

Artist Hana Rotchild hopes people will have a public conversation about privates after viewing her latest exhibition, Growing Numb.

The show runs until April 9 at the You Me Gallery in downtown Hamilton, and its main component is the definitely daring Vulva Imprints Project.

“Many women are made to feel uncomfortable, ashamed or embarrassed by their intimate body parts,” said Rotchild. “The VIProject hopes to change that by allowing women to publicly display their most personal signature in an artistic, dignified setting.”

About 40 women 16 to 90 contacted Rotchild over the past three years for a free Vulva Imprints Project art kit that included paint and paper. In their own safe, private setting, they then made an imprint of their intimate body parts.

“Some of the imprints look like sunsets, others look like butterflies,” said Rotchild. “You can see so many things; it’s such an open concept. It’s beautiful and poetic.”

Twenty-eight individual imprints make up the show, along with fibre art creations by Rotchild.

Her signature piece is a suspended cotton and polyester thread sculpture that Rotchild feels “represents the erosion of the self that often occurs during controlling or abusive relationships … a transformation of pain and anger into numbness.”

The message of the entire exhibit, said Rotchild, is to convey to women that they have the freedom to explore their bodies, express themselves, own their own space and be heard.

Rotchild, who has exhibited her work extensively in Hamilton and Israel, was born in Jerusalem and graduated from the Bezalel Academy for Art and Design. She worked in various multimedia design areas teaching homeless youth, before immigrating to Canada in 2003. In 2008, she graduated from the Toronto Art Therapy Institute and worked with the elderly. She has also counselled refugees and advocated for refugee children who have experienced trauma.

Three years ago, Rotchild graduated from the masters in social work program at Wilfrid Laurier University. Today, while living in Ancaster, she works at the Niagara Region Sexual Assault Centre in St. Catharines.

By day, she sees and hears the dreadful stories of women and children who have been harmed and minimized by society. By night, she needs a release for the cacophony of emotions that rise to the surface.

“Art balances my well-being and helps me process and advocate,” said Rotchild, whose passion has become promoting an acceptance of others and stopping sexual abuse.

Funds raised from the sale of the Vulva Imprints Project works of art will go to the Niagara Region Sexual Assault Centre.

For more information, visit www.artisthanarotchild.com.

 

Hana Rotchild’s Vulva Imprints Project on display at Hamilton’s You Me Gallery

Ancaster-based artist conducts Vulva Imprints Project

WhatsOn Mar 02, 2017 by Debra Downey Ancaster News

Artist Hana Rotchild hopes people will have a public conversation about privates after viewing her latest exhibition, Growing Numb.

The show runs until April 9 at the You Me Gallery in downtown Hamilton, and its main component is the definitely daring Vulva Imprints Project.

“Many women are made to feel uncomfortable, ashamed or embarrassed by their intimate body parts,” said Rotchild. “The VIProject hopes to change that by allowing women to publicly display their most personal signature in an artistic, dignified setting.”

About 40 women 16 to 90 contacted Rotchild over the past three years for a free Vulva Imprints Project art kit that included paint and paper. In their own safe, private setting, they then made an imprint of their intimate body parts.

“Some of the imprints look like sunsets, others look like butterflies.”

“Some of the imprints look like sunsets, others look like butterflies,” said Rotchild. “You can see so many things; it’s such an open concept. It’s beautiful and poetic.”

Twenty-eight individual imprints make up the show, along with fibre art creations by Rotchild.

Her signature piece is a suspended cotton and polyester thread sculpture that Rotchild feels “represents the erosion of the self that often occurs during controlling or abusive relationships … a transformation of pain and anger into numbness.”

The message of the entire exhibit, said Rotchild, is to convey to women that they have the freedom to explore their bodies, express themselves, own their own space and be heard.

Rotchild, who has exhibited her work extensively in Hamilton and Israel, was born in Jerusalem and graduated from the Bezalel Academy for Art and Design. She worked in various multimedia design areas teaching homeless youth, before immigrating to Canada in 2003. In 2008, she graduated from the Toronto Art Therapy Institute and worked with the elderly. She has also counselled refugees and advocated for refugee children who have experienced trauma.

Three years ago, Rotchild graduated from the masters in social work program at Wilfrid Laurier University. Today, while living in Ancaster, she works at the Niagara Region Sexual Assault Centre in St. Catharines.

By day, she sees and hears the dreadful stories of women and children who have been harmed and minimized by society. By night, she needs a release for the cacophony of emotions that rise to the surface.

“Art balances my well-being and helps me process and advocate,” said Rotchild, whose passion has become promoting an acceptance of others and stopping sexual abuse.

Funds raised from the sale of the Vulva Imprints Project works of art will go to the Niagara Region Sexual Assault Centre.

For more information, visit www.artisthanarotchild.com.

 

Hana Rotchild’s Vulva Imprints Project on display at Hamilton’s You Me Gallery

Ancaster-based artist conducts Vulva Imprints Project

WhatsOn Mar 02, 2017 by Debra Downey Ancaster News

Artist Hana Rotchild hopes people will have a public conversation about privates after viewing her latest exhibition, Growing Numb.

The show runs until April 9 at the You Me Gallery in downtown Hamilton, and its main component is the definitely daring Vulva Imprints Project.

“Many women are made to feel uncomfortable, ashamed or embarrassed by their intimate body parts,” said Rotchild. “The VIProject hopes to change that by allowing women to publicly display their most personal signature in an artistic, dignified setting.”

About 40 women 16 to 90 contacted Rotchild over the past three years for a free Vulva Imprints Project art kit that included paint and paper. In their own safe, private setting, they then made an imprint of their intimate body parts.

“Some of the imprints look like sunsets, others look like butterflies.”

“Some of the imprints look like sunsets, others look like butterflies,” said Rotchild. “You can see so many things; it’s such an open concept. It’s beautiful and poetic.”

Twenty-eight individual imprints make up the show, along with fibre art creations by Rotchild.

Her signature piece is a suspended cotton and polyester thread sculpture that Rotchild feels “represents the erosion of the self that often occurs during controlling or abusive relationships … a transformation of pain and anger into numbness.”

The message of the entire exhibit, said Rotchild, is to convey to women that they have the freedom to explore their bodies, express themselves, own their own space and be heard.

Rotchild, who has exhibited her work extensively in Hamilton and Israel, was born in Jerusalem and graduated from the Bezalel Academy for Art and Design. She worked in various multimedia design areas teaching homeless youth, before immigrating to Canada in 2003. In 2008, she graduated from the Toronto Art Therapy Institute and worked with the elderly. She has also counselled refugees and advocated for refugee children who have experienced trauma.

Three years ago, Rotchild graduated from the masters in social work program at Wilfrid Laurier University. Today, while living in Ancaster, she works at the Niagara Region Sexual Assault Centre in St. Catharines.

By day, she sees and hears the dreadful stories of women and children who have been harmed and minimized by society. By night, she needs a release for the cacophony of emotions that rise to the surface.

“Art balances my well-being and helps me process and advocate,” said Rotchild, whose passion has become promoting an acceptance of others and stopping sexual abuse.

Funds raised from the sale of the Vulva Imprints Project works of art will go to the Niagara Region Sexual Assault Centre.

For more information, visit www.artisthanarotchild.com.