Dundas Museum traces the true art of printmaking

WhatsOn Jul 20, 2016 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Dundas Museum collections manager Sandu Sindile took the opportunity for a teachable moment within the current exhibition 'Impressions: 500 years of printmaking'.

A simple photograph is the final piece in the back gallery, the last of at least 118 prints. It’s a reproduction made with a computer and a printer – and a misrepresentation of what a print really is.

“I want people to realize this is not printmaking,” Sindile said. “It’s what we call a print today - a cheap reproduction of a computer image on a printer.

“I wanted to show printmaking is a form of art. It was going on 500 years ago – and it’s still going on in Dundas today.”

‘Impressions’ runs until September 3 at the local community museum at 118 Park St. W.

The art form represented in the exhibition involves the intricate carving, or etching, of wood or other materials to create an image.  It’s then covered in ink and “stamped” onto paper.

Sindile, who previously worked at several art galleries before joining the Dundas Museum four years ago, shares his fascination for the art and history of printmaking.

“It’s so intricate. It’s just phenomenal,” Sindile said of the work that goes into the carvings.

Several magnifying glasses are scattered throughout the exhibition, giving visitors an opportunity to get an up-close look at the detailed work.

Printmaking was used to make pictures for early books, particularly religious texts. It was a key form of visual communication before photography – and also made fine art available to everyone.

Sindile said after artists created a painting, they would typically carve or etch the same image into wood or metal then make multiple copies of that original piece of art.

Printmaking gave artists a chance to make money – but also helped bring art to the people.

“Art for the masses,” Sindile said. “You may not have the original painting, but you can buy this.”

The exhibition carefully traces the evolution of printmaking from the 1500s to the present day – starting with six pieces from Albrecht Durer, who Sindile described as the best print maker in history, and moving through several students who studied under Durer. Sindile also highlights connections between individual artists.

“Those are the stories I really like to tell,” he said.

Prints by Rembrandt, Renoir and Manet help trace the history of the art. One wall of the gallery includes prints by Dundas artists. Placed prominently is a copy of a Dundas True Banner newspaper front page from 1877 – also a print.

Dundas artists include Robert Reginald Whale, and James Keagey – whose descendants still live in Dundas and provided Sindile with a binder full of his prints. Many were made on his trips around the world. Sindile chose a couple showing historic views of the Valley Town.

A display case shows prints made by Canadians – including prominent artist Homer Watson, who sold a painting the Queen Victoria in 1890 that is still in the royal family’s collection today.

“He made an etching of it – so that everyone could have one,” Sindile said.

The final wall of the exhibition features contemporary prints.

“It’s still being done,” Sindile said.

The exhibition includes a speaker series. Greg Davies, administrator of Dundas’ Carnegie Gallery spoke last week about the rise of the fine art print. On Aug. 4, Dr. Ibor Holubizky from McMaster Museum of Art will speak on the history of printmaking. On Aug. 11, contemporary artist and educator Ralph Heather speaks about being a printmaker today. On Sept. 1 Canadian artist Wesley Bates shares stories of his celebrated printmaking career. All lectures run from 6 to 7 p.m. at the museum.

For more information on the Dundas Museum and Archives visit www.dundasmuseum.ca

Dundas Museum traces the true art of printmaking

'Impressions' highlights local and international history

WhatsOn Jul 20, 2016 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Dundas Museum collections manager Sandu Sindile took the opportunity for a teachable moment within the current exhibition 'Impressions: 500 years of printmaking'.

A simple photograph is the final piece in the back gallery, the last of at least 118 prints. It’s a reproduction made with a computer and a printer – and a misrepresentation of what a print really is.

“I want people to realize this is not printmaking,” Sindile said. “It’s what we call a print today - a cheap reproduction of a computer image on a printer.

“I wanted to show printmaking is a form of art. It was going on 500 years ago – and it’s still going on in Dundas today.”

‘Impressions’ runs until September 3 at the local community museum at 118 Park St. W.

The art form represented in the exhibition involves the intricate carving, or etching, of wood or other materials to create an image.  It’s then covered in ink and “stamped” onto paper.

Sindile, who previously worked at several art galleries before joining the Dundas Museum four years ago, shares his fascination for the art and history of printmaking.

“It’s so intricate. It’s just phenomenal,” Sindile said of the work that goes into the carvings.

Several magnifying glasses are scattered throughout the exhibition, giving visitors an opportunity to get an up-close look at the detailed work.

Printmaking was used to make pictures for early books, particularly religious texts. It was a key form of visual communication before photography – and also made fine art available to everyone.

Sindile said after artists created a painting, they would typically carve or etch the same image into wood or metal then make multiple copies of that original piece of art.

Printmaking gave artists a chance to make money – but also helped bring art to the people.

“Art for the masses,” Sindile said. “You may not have the original painting, but you can buy this.”

The exhibition carefully traces the evolution of printmaking from the 1500s to the present day – starting with six pieces from Albrecht Durer, who Sindile described as the best print maker in history, and moving through several students who studied under Durer. Sindile also highlights connections between individual artists.

“Those are the stories I really like to tell,” he said.

Prints by Rembrandt, Renoir and Manet help trace the history of the art. One wall of the gallery includes prints by Dundas artists. Placed prominently is a copy of a Dundas True Banner newspaper front page from 1877 – also a print.

Dundas artists include Robert Reginald Whale, and James Keagey – whose descendants still live in Dundas and provided Sindile with a binder full of his prints. Many were made on his trips around the world. Sindile chose a couple showing historic views of the Valley Town.

A display case shows prints made by Canadians – including prominent artist Homer Watson, who sold a painting the Queen Victoria in 1890 that is still in the royal family’s collection today.

“He made an etching of it – so that everyone could have one,” Sindile said.

The final wall of the exhibition features contemporary prints.

“It’s still being done,” Sindile said.

The exhibition includes a speaker series. Greg Davies, administrator of Dundas’ Carnegie Gallery spoke last week about the rise of the fine art print. On Aug. 4, Dr. Ibor Holubizky from McMaster Museum of Art will speak on the history of printmaking. On Aug. 11, contemporary artist and educator Ralph Heather speaks about being a printmaker today. On Sept. 1 Canadian artist Wesley Bates shares stories of his celebrated printmaking career. All lectures run from 6 to 7 p.m. at the museum.

For more information on the Dundas Museum and Archives visit www.dundasmuseum.ca

Dundas Museum traces the true art of printmaking

'Impressions' highlights local and international history

WhatsOn Jul 20, 2016 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Dundas Museum collections manager Sandu Sindile took the opportunity for a teachable moment within the current exhibition 'Impressions: 500 years of printmaking'.

A simple photograph is the final piece in the back gallery, the last of at least 118 prints. It’s a reproduction made with a computer and a printer – and a misrepresentation of what a print really is.

“I want people to realize this is not printmaking,” Sindile said. “It’s what we call a print today - a cheap reproduction of a computer image on a printer.

“I wanted to show printmaking is a form of art. It was going on 500 years ago – and it’s still going on in Dundas today.”

‘Impressions’ runs until September 3 at the local community museum at 118 Park St. W.

The art form represented in the exhibition involves the intricate carving, or etching, of wood or other materials to create an image.  It’s then covered in ink and “stamped” onto paper.

Sindile, who previously worked at several art galleries before joining the Dundas Museum four years ago, shares his fascination for the art and history of printmaking.

“It’s so intricate. It’s just phenomenal,” Sindile said of the work that goes into the carvings.

Several magnifying glasses are scattered throughout the exhibition, giving visitors an opportunity to get an up-close look at the detailed work.

Printmaking was used to make pictures for early books, particularly religious texts. It was a key form of visual communication before photography – and also made fine art available to everyone.

Sindile said after artists created a painting, they would typically carve or etch the same image into wood or metal then make multiple copies of that original piece of art.

Printmaking gave artists a chance to make money – but also helped bring art to the people.

“Art for the masses,” Sindile said. “You may not have the original painting, but you can buy this.”

The exhibition carefully traces the evolution of printmaking from the 1500s to the present day – starting with six pieces from Albrecht Durer, who Sindile described as the best print maker in history, and moving through several students who studied under Durer. Sindile also highlights connections between individual artists.

“Those are the stories I really like to tell,” he said.

Prints by Rembrandt, Renoir and Manet help trace the history of the art. One wall of the gallery includes prints by Dundas artists. Placed prominently is a copy of a Dundas True Banner newspaper front page from 1877 – also a print.

Dundas artists include Robert Reginald Whale, and James Keagey – whose descendants still live in Dundas and provided Sindile with a binder full of his prints. Many were made on his trips around the world. Sindile chose a couple showing historic views of the Valley Town.

A display case shows prints made by Canadians – including prominent artist Homer Watson, who sold a painting the Queen Victoria in 1890 that is still in the royal family’s collection today.

“He made an etching of it – so that everyone could have one,” Sindile said.

The final wall of the exhibition features contemporary prints.

“It’s still being done,” Sindile said.

The exhibition includes a speaker series. Greg Davies, administrator of Dundas’ Carnegie Gallery spoke last week about the rise of the fine art print. On Aug. 4, Dr. Ibor Holubizky from McMaster Museum of Art will speak on the history of printmaking. On Aug. 11, contemporary artist and educator Ralph Heather speaks about being a printmaker today. On Sept. 1 Canadian artist Wesley Bates shares stories of his celebrated printmaking career. All lectures run from 6 to 7 p.m. at the museum.

For more information on the Dundas Museum and Archives visit www.dundasmuseum.ca