Ancaster paintings return home

WhatsOn Sep 11, 2020 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

For over 40 years, artist Vojislav Morosan captured a longing emotional impact in his over 1,000 paintings of various historic buildings and landscapes across Canada and parts of the United States.

The colours, symmetry and lighting delved into the essence of the structures and locations. When Morosan and his partner, Norma, lived in Stoney Creek, Vojislav would travel across Hamilton painting recognizable landscapes that were embedded into the local imagination, including in Ancaster.

In more than 20 watercolour paintings, he found the escapism contained in the painting “Winter in Ancaster;” the history captured in the painting Wilson Street; a historical serenity in Sulphur Springs and the elegance of the Hamilton Golf and Country Club structure.

Norma said Vojislav, who came to Canada from Serbia in 1968, painted the Ancaster pictures in the 1990s, while living in Stoney Creek after relocating from Oakville. Over the years Vojislav travelled around southern Ontario capturing images found in Guelph, Elora, Oakville, Burlington and Cambridge and found an intimacy within those communities.

He eventually expanded his vision to include landscapes in Eastern Canada, Southern California, Hawaii and British Columbia in both oil and watercolours. His paintings prompted galleries to host major exhibitions in Toronto, Oakville, Guelph, Burlington, San Diego-La Jolla, and Vancouver.

In 1996, the Morosans left Stoney Creek for White Rock, B.C. where Vojislav continued to paint. In 2008 he passed away at 67.

Over the years, Norma has been slowly returning his paintings to the communities that gave Vojislav the inspiration to create them.

She recently reached out to the representatives of the Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre to see if they would be interested in the works.

“They were so excited when they saw them,” said Norma. “They are recognizable homes and landscapes.”

Colin Lapsley, executive director of the Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre, almost “fell off my chair” when he saw the photos. He said Norma contacted them as part of her goal to reunite the paintings to the communities.

“We had a wonderful time with her, and the paintings were just fabulous,” he said.

Ancaster businessperson and philanthropist Bob Wilkins, who has been chair of the arts centre fundraising efforts, said the paintings represent the heart of Ancaster at its best.

“The paintings tie Ancaster and the arts centre together,” he said. “We were fabulously enthusiastic about the offer.”

Wilkins said most of the paintings will be installed at the arts centre, while some will be offered for sale with the funds going toward the facility. The arts centre will also offer limited edition signed prints of some of the paintings for sale to the public, he said.

“This is very exciting for me,” said Wilkins, who first introduced the idea to build an arts centre in downtown Ancaster.

Norma, who would assist her husband in identifying the best angle of a building to paint, took a tour of Wilson Street with Ancaster Society for the Performing Arts’ Anton Plas and saw again what Vojislav viewed when he first painted the buildings. She remembered the show that the Fieldcote Memorial Park and Museum held for Vojislav as Plas and her walked around the grounds.

“It was so beautiful to see the downtown again,” she said. “It gave me goosebumps.”

Norma said Vojislav would take photos and sketches of the subjects, then refer to them while painting.

While all the paintings are notable, Norma especially likes "Winter in Ancaster" with its fluffy snow on the buildings and landscape and the Old Town Hall building that Vojislav captured.

“It was exciting to see the (Old Town) hall,” she said. “Nothing really changes.”

A deal was worked out with Norma that eventually had about 24 of the paintings donated to the centre. Some will hang in the completed arts centre, scheduled for the end of 2021, said Wilkins.

Norma is continuing to connect the other paintings to their communities. Vojislav painted a number of buildings in Stoney Creek, as well as buildings and landscapes in Dundas, Grimsby, Beamsville, Burlington and Niagara. The task she has adopted would seem enormous. For instance, there are about 500 landscape paintings Vojislav created of White Rock, B.C., she said.

Norma, who received an invitation to attend the grand opening of the arts centre, says Vojislav “would have been surprised” that Ancaster residents would still have an emotional response to his paintings.

“He was happy that people appreciated his craft,” he said. “He would be overwhelmed with the outpouring of love for his paintings from the community that they essentially came from.”


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: When we heard original works by renowned artist Vojislav Morosan would be coming home to the new Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre, we wanted to find out more.

Ancaster paintings return home to the community that inspired them

WhatsOn Sep 11, 2020 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

For over 40 years, artist Vojislav Morosan captured a longing emotional impact in his over 1,000 paintings of various historic buildings and landscapes across Canada and parts of the United States.

The colours, symmetry and lighting delved into the essence of the structures and locations. When Morosan and his partner, Norma, lived in Stoney Creek, Vojislav would travel across Hamilton painting recognizable landscapes that were embedded into the local imagination, including in Ancaster.

In more than 20 watercolour paintings, he found the escapism contained in the painting “Winter in Ancaster;” the history captured in the painting Wilson Street; a historical serenity in Sulphur Springs and the elegance of the Hamilton Golf and Country Club structure.

Norma said Vojislav, who came to Canada from Serbia in 1968, painted the Ancaster pictures in the 1990s, while living in Stoney Creek after relocating from Oakville. Over the years Vojislav travelled around southern Ontario capturing images found in Guelph, Elora, Oakville, Burlington and Cambridge and found an intimacy within those communities.

Related Content

He eventually expanded his vision to include landscapes in Eastern Canada, Southern California, Hawaii and British Columbia in both oil and watercolours. His paintings prompted galleries to host major exhibitions in Toronto, Oakville, Guelph, Burlington, San Diego-La Jolla, and Vancouver.

In 1996, the Morosans left Stoney Creek for White Rock, B.C. where Vojislav continued to paint. In 2008 he passed away at 67.

Over the years, Norma has been slowly returning his paintings to the communities that gave Vojislav the inspiration to create them.

She recently reached out to the representatives of the Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre to see if they would be interested in the works.

“They were so excited when they saw them,” said Norma. “They are recognizable homes and landscapes.”

Colin Lapsley, executive director of the Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre, almost “fell off my chair” when he saw the photos. He said Norma contacted them as part of her goal to reunite the paintings to the communities.

“We had a wonderful time with her, and the paintings were just fabulous,” he said.

Ancaster businessperson and philanthropist Bob Wilkins, who has been chair of the arts centre fundraising efforts, said the paintings represent the heart of Ancaster at its best.

“The paintings tie Ancaster and the arts centre together,” he said. “We were fabulously enthusiastic about the offer.”

Wilkins said most of the paintings will be installed at the arts centre, while some will be offered for sale with the funds going toward the facility. The arts centre will also offer limited edition signed prints of some of the paintings for sale to the public, he said.

“This is very exciting for me,” said Wilkins, who first introduced the idea to build an arts centre in downtown Ancaster.

Norma, who would assist her husband in identifying the best angle of a building to paint, took a tour of Wilson Street with Ancaster Society for the Performing Arts’ Anton Plas and saw again what Vojislav viewed when he first painted the buildings. She remembered the show that the Fieldcote Memorial Park and Museum held for Vojislav as Plas and her walked around the grounds.

“It was so beautiful to see the downtown again,” she said. “It gave me goosebumps.”

Norma said Vojislav would take photos and sketches of the subjects, then refer to them while painting.

While all the paintings are notable, Norma especially likes "Winter in Ancaster" with its fluffy snow on the buildings and landscape and the Old Town Hall building that Vojislav captured.

“It was exciting to see the (Old Town) hall,” she said. “Nothing really changes.”

A deal was worked out with Norma that eventually had about 24 of the paintings donated to the centre. Some will hang in the completed arts centre, scheduled for the end of 2021, said Wilkins.

Norma is continuing to connect the other paintings to their communities. Vojislav painted a number of buildings in Stoney Creek, as well as buildings and landscapes in Dundas, Grimsby, Beamsville, Burlington and Niagara. The task she has adopted would seem enormous. For instance, there are about 500 landscape paintings Vojislav created of White Rock, B.C., she said.

Norma, who received an invitation to attend the grand opening of the arts centre, says Vojislav “would have been surprised” that Ancaster residents would still have an emotional response to his paintings.

“He was happy that people appreciated his craft,” he said. “He would be overwhelmed with the outpouring of love for his paintings from the community that they essentially came from.”


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: When we heard original works by renowned artist Vojislav Morosan would be coming home to the new Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre, we wanted to find out more.

Ancaster paintings return home to the community that inspired them

WhatsOn Sep 11, 2020 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

For over 40 years, artist Vojislav Morosan captured a longing emotional impact in his over 1,000 paintings of various historic buildings and landscapes across Canada and parts of the United States.

The colours, symmetry and lighting delved into the essence of the structures and locations. When Morosan and his partner, Norma, lived in Stoney Creek, Vojislav would travel across Hamilton painting recognizable landscapes that were embedded into the local imagination, including in Ancaster.

In more than 20 watercolour paintings, he found the escapism contained in the painting “Winter in Ancaster;” the history captured in the painting Wilson Street; a historical serenity in Sulphur Springs and the elegance of the Hamilton Golf and Country Club structure.

Norma said Vojislav, who came to Canada from Serbia in 1968, painted the Ancaster pictures in the 1990s, while living in Stoney Creek after relocating from Oakville. Over the years Vojislav travelled around southern Ontario capturing images found in Guelph, Elora, Oakville, Burlington and Cambridge and found an intimacy within those communities.

Related Content

He eventually expanded his vision to include landscapes in Eastern Canada, Southern California, Hawaii and British Columbia in both oil and watercolours. His paintings prompted galleries to host major exhibitions in Toronto, Oakville, Guelph, Burlington, San Diego-La Jolla, and Vancouver.

In 1996, the Morosans left Stoney Creek for White Rock, B.C. where Vojislav continued to paint. In 2008 he passed away at 67.

Over the years, Norma has been slowly returning his paintings to the communities that gave Vojislav the inspiration to create them.

She recently reached out to the representatives of the Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre to see if they would be interested in the works.

“They were so excited when they saw them,” said Norma. “They are recognizable homes and landscapes.”

Colin Lapsley, executive director of the Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre, almost “fell off my chair” when he saw the photos. He said Norma contacted them as part of her goal to reunite the paintings to the communities.

“We had a wonderful time with her, and the paintings were just fabulous,” he said.

Ancaster businessperson and philanthropist Bob Wilkins, who has been chair of the arts centre fundraising efforts, said the paintings represent the heart of Ancaster at its best.

“The paintings tie Ancaster and the arts centre together,” he said. “We were fabulously enthusiastic about the offer.”

Wilkins said most of the paintings will be installed at the arts centre, while some will be offered for sale with the funds going toward the facility. The arts centre will also offer limited edition signed prints of some of the paintings for sale to the public, he said.

“This is very exciting for me,” said Wilkins, who first introduced the idea to build an arts centre in downtown Ancaster.

Norma, who would assist her husband in identifying the best angle of a building to paint, took a tour of Wilson Street with Ancaster Society for the Performing Arts’ Anton Plas and saw again what Vojislav viewed when he first painted the buildings. She remembered the show that the Fieldcote Memorial Park and Museum held for Vojislav as Plas and her walked around the grounds.

“It was so beautiful to see the downtown again,” she said. “It gave me goosebumps.”

Norma said Vojislav would take photos and sketches of the subjects, then refer to them while painting.

While all the paintings are notable, Norma especially likes "Winter in Ancaster" with its fluffy snow on the buildings and landscape and the Old Town Hall building that Vojislav captured.

“It was exciting to see the (Old Town) hall,” she said. “Nothing really changes.”

A deal was worked out with Norma that eventually had about 24 of the paintings donated to the centre. Some will hang in the completed arts centre, scheduled for the end of 2021, said Wilkins.

Norma is continuing to connect the other paintings to their communities. Vojislav painted a number of buildings in Stoney Creek, as well as buildings and landscapes in Dundas, Grimsby, Beamsville, Burlington and Niagara. The task she has adopted would seem enormous. For instance, there are about 500 landscape paintings Vojislav created of White Rock, B.C., she said.

Norma, who received an invitation to attend the grand opening of the arts centre, says Vojislav “would have been surprised” that Ancaster residents would still have an emotional response to his paintings.

“He was happy that people appreciated his craft,” he said. “He would be overwhelmed with the outpouring of love for his paintings from the community that they essentially came from.”


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: When we heard original works by renowned artist Vojislav Morosan would be coming home to the new Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre, we wanted to find out more.