The Marvelous Mohawk to be inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame

Sports Apr 21, 2017 by Darryl Smart The Sachem

When you talk about lacrosse, it’s hard not to mention Gaylord Powless’ name.

The son of Ross and Wilma Powless, who is a Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Famer, quickly carved his own path in the sport. With a combination of strength, power, vision like no other and a love for the Creator’s game, Gaylord Powless became one of the greatest to ever play.

On Wednesday, the Marvelous Mohawk finally got his do, being named to the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame class of 2017.

There are several great lacrosse players to come out of Six Nations, but Gaylord set the bar for those who followed in his footsteps,” said Duane Jacobs, who is an Ontario Lacrosse Hall of Famer and currently the president of the Six Nations Chiefs, of Major Series Lacrosse. “His legacy will forever be remembered not only in Six Nations but all of Canada.”

Gaylord Powless’ career began like many on Six Nations, living lacrosse. At 17, he began to catch people’s attention, winning the 1964 Tom Longboat Award, in honour of Canada’s top Native athlete.

This was a sign of things to come.

Powless played for the Oshawa Green Gaels for four years, where he led them to four Minto Cups, emblematic of the Canadian junior A championship. In two of those years, 1964 and 1967, Powless was the Minto Cup Most Valuable Player.

During that time he won numerous awards for scoring, as well as the Ken Ross Trophy for Ability and Sportsmanship, twice.

In 1966 he set a league and Canadian junior A record with his 191 regular season points.

Gaylord was a tremendously talented player with an indomitable spirit, whose ability just took over where he became a proficient faceoff man,” Canadian Lacrosse Association director, Rusty Doxtator said. “He was also a great playmaker, accounting for his scoring large number of points for assists, as well as goals. It is with the utmost honour and respect that I wish to endorse the Canada’s Sports Hall of fame nomination.”

After his junior career, Powless went on to a long, successful professional and senior career. Playing in the National Lacrosse Association, he played for Detroit, Syracuse, New York and Montreal, while spending his summer playing senior B with Oshawa and Six Nations, as well as senior A with Brantford, Six Nations and Coquitlam.

In his first three senior A seasons with the Brantford Warriors, he helped lead them to the Ontario title three times, winning the Ontario title twice. In 1971, he led the Warriors to the Mann Cup championship.   

In 1977, Powless capped his senior A career with an Ontario title with the Brampton Excelsiors, but lost to the Vancouver Burrards in the Mann Cup.

In 227 games in pro and senior, Powless scored 376 goals and 624 assists for 1,000 points, and shares the record for most points in a senior A game with 17. Powless did it twice with the Warriors in 1970 and 1971.

At the international level, Powless played on a number of teams representing Canada. One highlight was winning the Indian International Field Lacrosse Tournament at Expo 67 against the United States.

Another crowning moment was at the 1974 North American Indigenous Lacrosse Tournament. Gaylord was joined by his five brothers, while their father coached the team to victory.

Powless and his father are the only father and son both elected to the Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame. Ross Powless was inducted in 1969 and Gaylord was in 1990.

He was an extraordinary lacrosse player, proud of his heritage and family name,” Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame governor David Soul said. “To soar to the lofty heights of stardom he enjoyed, he had to overcome many obstacles - hurtful racist taunts from fan and foe alike meant to throw him off his game, a trick knee, and a damaged back. Through it all, though, he beat back the personal barriers to excel in the game of his forefathers.”

NOTES: Nine inductees were named to Canada's Sports Hall of Fame Wednesday. They are triathlete Simon Whitfield, wrestler Carol Huynh, doctors Robert Jackson and Charles Tator, Powless, and the Edmonton Grads women's basketball team joined hockey player Lanny McDonald, golfer Mike Weir, and speed skater Cindy Klassen.

dsmart@norfolknews.ca

twitter.com/darrylsmart1

The Marvelous Mohawk to be inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame

Lacrosse star Gaylord Powless among Class of 2017

Sports Apr 21, 2017 by Darryl Smart The Sachem

When you talk about lacrosse, it’s hard not to mention Gaylord Powless’ name.

The son of Ross and Wilma Powless, who is a Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Famer, quickly carved his own path in the sport. With a combination of strength, power, vision like no other and a love for the Creator’s game, Gaylord Powless became one of the greatest to ever play.

On Wednesday, the Marvelous Mohawk finally got his do, being named to the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame class of 2017.

There are several great lacrosse players to come out of Six Nations, but Gaylord set the bar for those who followed in his footsteps,” said Duane Jacobs, who is an Ontario Lacrosse Hall of Famer and currently the president of the Six Nations Chiefs, of Major Series Lacrosse. “His legacy will forever be remembered not only in Six Nations but all of Canada.”

Gaylord Powless’ career began like many on Six Nations, living lacrosse. At 17, he began to catch people’s attention, winning the 1964 Tom Longboat Award, in honour of Canada’s top Native athlete.

This was a sign of things to come.

Powless played for the Oshawa Green Gaels for four years, where he led them to four Minto Cups, emblematic of the Canadian junior A championship. In two of those years, 1964 and 1967, Powless was the Minto Cup Most Valuable Player.

During that time he won numerous awards for scoring, as well as the Ken Ross Trophy for Ability and Sportsmanship, twice.

In 1966 he set a league and Canadian junior A record with his 191 regular season points.

Gaylord was a tremendously talented player with an indomitable spirit, whose ability just took over where he became a proficient faceoff man,” Canadian Lacrosse Association director, Rusty Doxtator said. “He was also a great playmaker, accounting for his scoring large number of points for assists, as well as goals. It is with the utmost honour and respect that I wish to endorse the Canada’s Sports Hall of fame nomination.”

After his junior career, Powless went on to a long, successful professional and senior career. Playing in the National Lacrosse Association, he played for Detroit, Syracuse, New York and Montreal, while spending his summer playing senior B with Oshawa and Six Nations, as well as senior A with Brantford, Six Nations and Coquitlam.

In his first three senior A seasons with the Brantford Warriors, he helped lead them to the Ontario title three times, winning the Ontario title twice. In 1971, he led the Warriors to the Mann Cup championship.   

In 1977, Powless capped his senior A career with an Ontario title with the Brampton Excelsiors, but lost to the Vancouver Burrards in the Mann Cup.

In 227 games in pro and senior, Powless scored 376 goals and 624 assists for 1,000 points, and shares the record for most points in a senior A game with 17. Powless did it twice with the Warriors in 1970 and 1971.

At the international level, Powless played on a number of teams representing Canada. One highlight was winning the Indian International Field Lacrosse Tournament at Expo 67 against the United States.

Another crowning moment was at the 1974 North American Indigenous Lacrosse Tournament. Gaylord was joined by his five brothers, while their father coached the team to victory.

Powless and his father are the only father and son both elected to the Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame. Ross Powless was inducted in 1969 and Gaylord was in 1990.

He was an extraordinary lacrosse player, proud of his heritage and family name,” Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame governor David Soul said. “To soar to the lofty heights of stardom he enjoyed, he had to overcome many obstacles - hurtful racist taunts from fan and foe alike meant to throw him off his game, a trick knee, and a damaged back. Through it all, though, he beat back the personal barriers to excel in the game of his forefathers.”

NOTES: Nine inductees were named to Canada's Sports Hall of Fame Wednesday. They are triathlete Simon Whitfield, wrestler Carol Huynh, doctors Robert Jackson and Charles Tator, Powless, and the Edmonton Grads women's basketball team joined hockey player Lanny McDonald, golfer Mike Weir, and speed skater Cindy Klassen.

dsmart@norfolknews.ca

twitter.com/darrylsmart1

The Marvelous Mohawk to be inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame

Lacrosse star Gaylord Powless among Class of 2017

Sports Apr 21, 2017 by Darryl Smart The Sachem

When you talk about lacrosse, it’s hard not to mention Gaylord Powless’ name.

The son of Ross and Wilma Powless, who is a Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Famer, quickly carved his own path in the sport. With a combination of strength, power, vision like no other and a love for the Creator’s game, Gaylord Powless became one of the greatest to ever play.

On Wednesday, the Marvelous Mohawk finally got his do, being named to the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame class of 2017.

There are several great lacrosse players to come out of Six Nations, but Gaylord set the bar for those who followed in his footsteps,” said Duane Jacobs, who is an Ontario Lacrosse Hall of Famer and currently the president of the Six Nations Chiefs, of Major Series Lacrosse. “His legacy will forever be remembered not only in Six Nations but all of Canada.”

Gaylord Powless’ career began like many on Six Nations, living lacrosse. At 17, he began to catch people’s attention, winning the 1964 Tom Longboat Award, in honour of Canada’s top Native athlete.

This was a sign of things to come.

Powless played for the Oshawa Green Gaels for four years, where he led them to four Minto Cups, emblematic of the Canadian junior A championship. In two of those years, 1964 and 1967, Powless was the Minto Cup Most Valuable Player.

During that time he won numerous awards for scoring, as well as the Ken Ross Trophy for Ability and Sportsmanship, twice.

In 1966 he set a league and Canadian junior A record with his 191 regular season points.

Gaylord was a tremendously talented player with an indomitable spirit, whose ability just took over where he became a proficient faceoff man,” Canadian Lacrosse Association director, Rusty Doxtator said. “He was also a great playmaker, accounting for his scoring large number of points for assists, as well as goals. It is with the utmost honour and respect that I wish to endorse the Canada’s Sports Hall of fame nomination.”

After his junior career, Powless went on to a long, successful professional and senior career. Playing in the National Lacrosse Association, he played for Detroit, Syracuse, New York and Montreal, while spending his summer playing senior B with Oshawa and Six Nations, as well as senior A with Brantford, Six Nations and Coquitlam.

In his first three senior A seasons with the Brantford Warriors, he helped lead them to the Ontario title three times, winning the Ontario title twice. In 1971, he led the Warriors to the Mann Cup championship.   

In 1977, Powless capped his senior A career with an Ontario title with the Brampton Excelsiors, but lost to the Vancouver Burrards in the Mann Cup.

In 227 games in pro and senior, Powless scored 376 goals and 624 assists for 1,000 points, and shares the record for most points in a senior A game with 17. Powless did it twice with the Warriors in 1970 and 1971.

At the international level, Powless played on a number of teams representing Canada. One highlight was winning the Indian International Field Lacrosse Tournament at Expo 67 against the United States.

Another crowning moment was at the 1974 North American Indigenous Lacrosse Tournament. Gaylord was joined by his five brothers, while their father coached the team to victory.

Powless and his father are the only father and son both elected to the Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame. Ross Powless was inducted in 1969 and Gaylord was in 1990.

He was an extraordinary lacrosse player, proud of his heritage and family name,” Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame governor David Soul said. “To soar to the lofty heights of stardom he enjoyed, he had to overcome many obstacles - hurtful racist taunts from fan and foe alike meant to throw him off his game, a trick knee, and a damaged back. Through it all, though, he beat back the personal barriers to excel in the game of his forefathers.”

NOTES: Nine inductees were named to Canada's Sports Hall of Fame Wednesday. They are triathlete Simon Whitfield, wrestler Carol Huynh, doctors Robert Jackson and Charles Tator, Powless, and the Edmonton Grads women's basketball team joined hockey player Lanny McDonald, golfer Mike Weir, and speed skater Cindy Klassen.

dsmart@norfolknews.ca

twitter.com/darrylsmart1