Looking for descendants of our relative, plus other letters

Opinion May 14, 2020 Dundas Star News

LOOKING FOR DESCENDANTS OF OUR RELATIVE

My cousin and I are in lockdown, like you, so we are tracing our family tree on our respective mothers' sides. We have discovered a very adventurous brother to our grandfather.

Charles Samuel Reynolds was born in St Albans, Hertfordshire, England in 1881. He survived diphtheria and smallpox as a child. He joined the British Army in 1899 and fought in South Africa in the Boer War.

For some reason he immigrated to Canada in 1902, presumably after leaving the army. Shortly after, he married Bessie (Elizabeth) Brewin and they started a family. The address on the 1911 Census was 32 Bowen St. in Hamilton. At the outbreak of the First World War, he served in the Canadian Expeditionary Force.

After the war he returned to Canada, and by the 1921 Census, he was at 131 Young St. in Hamilton.

After 1921, we know nothing of him and his children's whereabouts, apart from the fact that Charles died at the Loch Sloy Nursing Home in Winona near Hamilton in 1963, aged 82.

Charles and Bessie's children's names were: Charles Reynolds, born 1905; Florence, born 1907; George W., born 1911; and Minnie, born 1913.

I’m looking for information of any descendants of Charles, born 1881, who might still be living in the Hamilton area.

Anyone interesting in getting in touch can contact me by email at drderekroft3@gmail.com.

Derek Roft,

Birmingham, England

CLOSE KING STREET IN DUNDAS TO HELP RESTAURANTS, SHOPS

I propose closing King Street to traffic to allow Dundas restaurants and storefronts to move operations outside and still allow room for pedestrians to maintain social distance. This would not create festival crowds as it would be a daily ongoing event. Keeping the cross streets open would allow access to parking and not disrupt the very reduced traffic that we are experiencing now.

I think everyone is eager to support our local businesses and give them a fighting chance during this unprecedented time.

Andrea Bradshaw,

Dundas

COVID-19 RULES HAVE ME FEELING LIKE A PUPPET

First our leading health experts tell us about a virus they seem complacent about, saying not to worry about it. The virus comes over to Canada; it spreads. Health officials try to control the virus. Our government leaders tell us sternly then to distance ourselves from each other; it will be the public’s fault if we don’t flatten the curve and we don’t distance ourselves. We obey and distance ourselves; shops and the border are shut down meanwhile.

No sooner and not surprisingly, Prime Minster Trudeau and Premier Ford congratulate us for flattening the curve, for saving thousands of people’s lives and not overwhelming the hospitals with COVID-19 patients, based on a health expert’s projection that seems to be deviated by thousands and thousands of possible deaths and people on ventilators in hospitals that didn’t, or hasn’t, occurred.

Now, our provincial and federal government leaders are slowly reopening the economy, telling us to go shopping, go golfing and go to restaurants, respecting safe distancing rules, while a virus is still among us, people are still dying and there is nothing stopping the virus yet. I don’t know about anyone else, but I feel something like a puppet on a string these days.

This merry-go-round all just doesn’t feel right, to me, anyway.

Tina Maini,

Hamilton

HARRIS PROMOTED PRIVATIZATION OF LONG-TERM CARE

The reason for the death of so many senior Ontarians can be found in the actions of former Tory Premier Mike Harris. He privatized long-term-care and made it easier for companies to build senior warehouses.

Four residents to a room is unconscionable. It was Harris who personally benefited by being the chair of the board of the long-term-care company, Chartwell Homes. One of their facilities is located on Governors Road in Dundas.

Harris benefited from the privatization by being appointed chair of the Board of Chartwell and being paid $237,000 a year. How often does the board meet? Is it too strong to call Harris' behaviours immoral?

It was Harris who sold the people's highway, the 407, to foreigners, depriving the public purse of the toll revenues.

We can wonder what property taxes would be for the folk in Dundas if we had not been pushed into amalgamation with Hamilton by Harris.

Many agree that Doug Ford is doing a good job now. But he and the Tories will return to their favouring of rich folk after the threat of the virus passes.

Kenneth Jackson,

Dundas

FAITH IN THE AMERICAN VOTER

These are troubling times as we face down the muzzle of a double-barrel shotgun. One side is loaded with COVID-19 and the other with President Trump. I have faith in mankind and it will be the people who will ultimately resolve these current life issues. And when will this happen? As for the virus, I have no idea, except it will be a while. As for President Trump, I know when. It will be in the first week of November, 2020. I have faith in the American voter and that they will definitively flush Donald J. Trump out to sea.

Glenn Simpson,

Hamilton Mountain

Looking for descendants of our relative, plus other letters

Opinion May 14, 2020 Dundas Star News

LOOKING FOR DESCENDANTS OF OUR RELATIVE

My cousin and I are in lockdown, like you, so we are tracing our family tree on our respective mothers' sides. We have discovered a very adventurous brother to our grandfather.

Charles Samuel Reynolds was born in St Albans, Hertfordshire, England in 1881. He survived diphtheria and smallpox as a child. He joined the British Army in 1899 and fought in South Africa in the Boer War.

For some reason he immigrated to Canada in 1902, presumably after leaving the army. Shortly after, he married Bessie (Elizabeth) Brewin and they started a family. The address on the 1911 Census was 32 Bowen St. in Hamilton. At the outbreak of the First World War, he served in the Canadian Expeditionary Force.

After the war he returned to Canada, and by the 1921 Census, he was at 131 Young St. in Hamilton.

After 1921, we know nothing of him and his children's whereabouts, apart from the fact that Charles died at the Loch Sloy Nursing Home in Winona near Hamilton in 1963, aged 82.

Charles and Bessie's children's names were: Charles Reynolds, born 1905; Florence, born 1907; George W., born 1911; and Minnie, born 1913.

I’m looking for information of any descendants of Charles, born 1881, who might still be living in the Hamilton area.

Anyone interesting in getting in touch can contact me by email at drderekroft3@gmail.com.

Derek Roft,

Birmingham, England

CLOSE KING STREET IN DUNDAS TO HELP RESTAURANTS, SHOPS

I propose closing King Street to traffic to allow Dundas restaurants and storefronts to move operations outside and still allow room for pedestrians to maintain social distance. This would not create festival crowds as it would be a daily ongoing event. Keeping the cross streets open would allow access to parking and not disrupt the very reduced traffic that we are experiencing now.

I think everyone is eager to support our local businesses and give them a fighting chance during this unprecedented time.

Andrea Bradshaw,

Dundas

COVID-19 RULES HAVE ME FEELING LIKE A PUPPET

First our leading health experts tell us about a virus they seem complacent about, saying not to worry about it. The virus comes over to Canada; it spreads. Health officials try to control the virus. Our government leaders tell us sternly then to distance ourselves from each other; it will be the public’s fault if we don’t flatten the curve and we don’t distance ourselves. We obey and distance ourselves; shops and the border are shut down meanwhile.

No sooner and not surprisingly, Prime Minster Trudeau and Premier Ford congratulate us for flattening the curve, for saving thousands of people’s lives and not overwhelming the hospitals with COVID-19 patients, based on a health expert’s projection that seems to be deviated by thousands and thousands of possible deaths and people on ventilators in hospitals that didn’t, or hasn’t, occurred.

Now, our provincial and federal government leaders are slowly reopening the economy, telling us to go shopping, go golfing and go to restaurants, respecting safe distancing rules, while a virus is still among us, people are still dying and there is nothing stopping the virus yet. I don’t know about anyone else, but I feel something like a puppet on a string these days.

This merry-go-round all just doesn’t feel right, to me, anyway.

Tina Maini,

Hamilton

HARRIS PROMOTED PRIVATIZATION OF LONG-TERM CARE

The reason for the death of so many senior Ontarians can be found in the actions of former Tory Premier Mike Harris. He privatized long-term-care and made it easier for companies to build senior warehouses.

Four residents to a room is unconscionable. It was Harris who personally benefited by being the chair of the board of the long-term-care company, Chartwell Homes. One of their facilities is located on Governors Road in Dundas.

Harris benefited from the privatization by being appointed chair of the Board of Chartwell and being paid $237,000 a year. How often does the board meet? Is it too strong to call Harris' behaviours immoral?

It was Harris who sold the people's highway, the 407, to foreigners, depriving the public purse of the toll revenues.

We can wonder what property taxes would be for the folk in Dundas if we had not been pushed into amalgamation with Hamilton by Harris.

Many agree that Doug Ford is doing a good job now. But he and the Tories will return to their favouring of rich folk after the threat of the virus passes.

Kenneth Jackson,

Dundas

FAITH IN THE AMERICAN VOTER

These are troubling times as we face down the muzzle of a double-barrel shotgun. One side is loaded with COVID-19 and the other with President Trump. I have faith in mankind and it will be the people who will ultimately resolve these current life issues. And when will this happen? As for the virus, I have no idea, except it will be a while. As for President Trump, I know when. It will be in the first week of November, 2020. I have faith in the American voter and that they will definitively flush Donald J. Trump out to sea.

Glenn Simpson,

Hamilton Mountain

Looking for descendants of our relative, plus other letters

Opinion May 14, 2020 Dundas Star News

LOOKING FOR DESCENDANTS OF OUR RELATIVE

My cousin and I are in lockdown, like you, so we are tracing our family tree on our respective mothers' sides. We have discovered a very adventurous brother to our grandfather.

Charles Samuel Reynolds was born in St Albans, Hertfordshire, England in 1881. He survived diphtheria and smallpox as a child. He joined the British Army in 1899 and fought in South Africa in the Boer War.

For some reason he immigrated to Canada in 1902, presumably after leaving the army. Shortly after, he married Bessie (Elizabeth) Brewin and they started a family. The address on the 1911 Census was 32 Bowen St. in Hamilton. At the outbreak of the First World War, he served in the Canadian Expeditionary Force.

After the war he returned to Canada, and by the 1921 Census, he was at 131 Young St. in Hamilton.

After 1921, we know nothing of him and his children's whereabouts, apart from the fact that Charles died at the Loch Sloy Nursing Home in Winona near Hamilton in 1963, aged 82.

Charles and Bessie's children's names were: Charles Reynolds, born 1905; Florence, born 1907; George W., born 1911; and Minnie, born 1913.

I’m looking for information of any descendants of Charles, born 1881, who might still be living in the Hamilton area.

Anyone interesting in getting in touch can contact me by email at drderekroft3@gmail.com.

Derek Roft,

Birmingham, England

CLOSE KING STREET IN DUNDAS TO HELP RESTAURANTS, SHOPS

I propose closing King Street to traffic to allow Dundas restaurants and storefronts to move operations outside and still allow room for pedestrians to maintain social distance. This would not create festival crowds as it would be a daily ongoing event. Keeping the cross streets open would allow access to parking and not disrupt the very reduced traffic that we are experiencing now.

I think everyone is eager to support our local businesses and give them a fighting chance during this unprecedented time.

Andrea Bradshaw,

Dundas

COVID-19 RULES HAVE ME FEELING LIKE A PUPPET

First our leading health experts tell us about a virus they seem complacent about, saying not to worry about it. The virus comes over to Canada; it spreads. Health officials try to control the virus. Our government leaders tell us sternly then to distance ourselves from each other; it will be the public’s fault if we don’t flatten the curve and we don’t distance ourselves. We obey and distance ourselves; shops and the border are shut down meanwhile.

No sooner and not surprisingly, Prime Minster Trudeau and Premier Ford congratulate us for flattening the curve, for saving thousands of people’s lives and not overwhelming the hospitals with COVID-19 patients, based on a health expert’s projection that seems to be deviated by thousands and thousands of possible deaths and people on ventilators in hospitals that didn’t, or hasn’t, occurred.

Now, our provincial and federal government leaders are slowly reopening the economy, telling us to go shopping, go golfing and go to restaurants, respecting safe distancing rules, while a virus is still among us, people are still dying and there is nothing stopping the virus yet. I don’t know about anyone else, but I feel something like a puppet on a string these days.

This merry-go-round all just doesn’t feel right, to me, anyway.

Tina Maini,

Hamilton

HARRIS PROMOTED PRIVATIZATION OF LONG-TERM CARE

The reason for the death of so many senior Ontarians can be found in the actions of former Tory Premier Mike Harris. He privatized long-term-care and made it easier for companies to build senior warehouses.

Four residents to a room is unconscionable. It was Harris who personally benefited by being the chair of the board of the long-term-care company, Chartwell Homes. One of their facilities is located on Governors Road in Dundas.

Harris benefited from the privatization by being appointed chair of the Board of Chartwell and being paid $237,000 a year. How often does the board meet? Is it too strong to call Harris' behaviours immoral?

It was Harris who sold the people's highway, the 407, to foreigners, depriving the public purse of the toll revenues.

We can wonder what property taxes would be for the folk in Dundas if we had not been pushed into amalgamation with Hamilton by Harris.

Many agree that Doug Ford is doing a good job now. But he and the Tories will return to their favouring of rich folk after the threat of the virus passes.

Kenneth Jackson,

Dundas

FAITH IN THE AMERICAN VOTER

These are troubling times as we face down the muzzle of a double-barrel shotgun. One side is loaded with COVID-19 and the other with President Trump. I have faith in mankind and it will be the people who will ultimately resolve these current life issues. And when will this happen? As for the virus, I have no idea, except it will be a while. As for President Trump, I know when. It will be in the first week of November, 2020. I have faith in the American voter and that they will definitively flush Donald J. Trump out to sea.

Glenn Simpson,

Hamilton Mountain