Wearing a coronavirus mask in public was no big deal

Opinion Apr 16, 2020 by Gordon Cameron hamiltonnews.com

Over the last several weeks I’ve been doing my best to practice physical distancing. I only leave my apartment to get groceries or to run unavoidable errands. I push out into the road if I’m walking along a sidewalk and meet someone coming in the opposite direction. I even recoil from my parents if they try to get within two metres of me.

We all want this to be over, and if I’m going to be telling you every week not to get too close to others then I should be walking the talk myself.

As good as I’ve been with staying home and sanitizing my hands whenever I do venture out, that was the limit of my precautions. It wasn’t until I made a fortuitous discovery amongst my tools that I decided to take things a step further.

I started wearing a mask out in public.

I’d always been one of those people who rolled his eyes (at least metaphorically) whenever I’d see someone out and about wearing a surgical or other mask in public. Of course, it was a different time lo those months ago, but my erstwhile attitude still coloured how I thought others might perceive me. No matter. Better to be thought of as overly cautious than to help spread the pandemic.

I needn’t have worried. While the vast majority of the faces at the grocery store went uncovered, no one even batted an eyelash at the fact that mine was.

Satisfied I wasn’t being silently judged, I came to a few important truths about wearing a mask for a prolonged period of time: 1) They tend to make your face hot. While there was good airflow in and out of the mask, the heat from my breath did tend to build up. Not quite to the point of making my beard sweat, but enough that I couldn’t wait to take it off. 2) Having a beard made it difficult to get a good seal. While my hairy cheeks and chin didn’t render the mask useless, there were several moments where if I moved my head or face just so I could feel the mask lift away from my skin. 3) It’s the little things you miss. As one who tends to put his pen in his mouth, it felt strange to have to hold it in my hand as I crossed items off my shopping list.

However, it’ll all be worth it in the end if I can cross not getting coronavirus off my life list.

Gordon Cameron is the group managing editor for Hamilton Community News.


Wearing a coronavirus mask in public was no big deal

Columnist Gordon Cameron says his fears were unfounded

Opinion Apr 16, 2020 by Gordon Cameron hamiltonnews.com

Over the last several weeks I’ve been doing my best to practice physical distancing. I only leave my apartment to get groceries or to run unavoidable errands. I push out into the road if I’m walking along a sidewalk and meet someone coming in the opposite direction. I even recoil from my parents if they try to get within two metres of me.

We all want this to be over, and if I’m going to be telling you every week not to get too close to others then I should be walking the talk myself.

As good as I’ve been with staying home and sanitizing my hands whenever I do venture out, that was the limit of my precautions. It wasn’t until I made a fortuitous discovery amongst my tools that I decided to take things a step further.

I started wearing a mask out in public.

Related Content

I’d always been one of those people who rolled his eyes (at least metaphorically) whenever I’d see someone out and about wearing a surgical or other mask in public. Of course, it was a different time lo those months ago, but my erstwhile attitude still coloured how I thought others might perceive me. No matter. Better to be thought of as overly cautious than to help spread the pandemic.

I needn’t have worried. While the vast majority of the faces at the grocery store went uncovered, no one even batted an eyelash at the fact that mine was.

Satisfied I wasn’t being silently judged, I came to a few important truths about wearing a mask for a prolonged period of time: 1) They tend to make your face hot. While there was good airflow in and out of the mask, the heat from my breath did tend to build up. Not quite to the point of making my beard sweat, but enough that I couldn’t wait to take it off. 2) Having a beard made it difficult to get a good seal. While my hairy cheeks and chin didn’t render the mask useless, there were several moments where if I moved my head or face just so I could feel the mask lift away from my skin. 3) It’s the little things you miss. As one who tends to put his pen in his mouth, it felt strange to have to hold it in my hand as I crossed items off my shopping list.

However, it’ll all be worth it in the end if I can cross not getting coronavirus off my life list.

Gordon Cameron is the group managing editor for Hamilton Community News.


Wearing a coronavirus mask in public was no big deal

Columnist Gordon Cameron says his fears were unfounded

Opinion Apr 16, 2020 by Gordon Cameron hamiltonnews.com

Over the last several weeks I’ve been doing my best to practice physical distancing. I only leave my apartment to get groceries or to run unavoidable errands. I push out into the road if I’m walking along a sidewalk and meet someone coming in the opposite direction. I even recoil from my parents if they try to get within two metres of me.

We all want this to be over, and if I’m going to be telling you every week not to get too close to others then I should be walking the talk myself.

As good as I’ve been with staying home and sanitizing my hands whenever I do venture out, that was the limit of my precautions. It wasn’t until I made a fortuitous discovery amongst my tools that I decided to take things a step further.

I started wearing a mask out in public.

Related Content

I’d always been one of those people who rolled his eyes (at least metaphorically) whenever I’d see someone out and about wearing a surgical or other mask in public. Of course, it was a different time lo those months ago, but my erstwhile attitude still coloured how I thought others might perceive me. No matter. Better to be thought of as overly cautious than to help spread the pandemic.

I needn’t have worried. While the vast majority of the faces at the grocery store went uncovered, no one even batted an eyelash at the fact that mine was.

Satisfied I wasn’t being silently judged, I came to a few important truths about wearing a mask for a prolonged period of time: 1) They tend to make your face hot. While there was good airflow in and out of the mask, the heat from my breath did tend to build up. Not quite to the point of making my beard sweat, but enough that I couldn’t wait to take it off. 2) Having a beard made it difficult to get a good seal. While my hairy cheeks and chin didn’t render the mask useless, there were several moments where if I moved my head or face just so I could feel the mask lift away from my skin. 3) It’s the little things you miss. As one who tends to put his pen in his mouth, it felt strange to have to hold it in my hand as I crossed items off my shopping list.

However, it’ll all be worth it in the end if I can cross not getting coronavirus off my life list.

Gordon Cameron is the group managing editor for Hamilton Community News.