LETTER: Restricting waterfall access necessary and intended consequence

Opinion Jul 14, 2017 Ancaster News

Re: City needs to stop the nanny state attitude over our local waterfalls

I am truly amazed by the letter writer’s assertion that a hands-off policy on controlling access to Albion Falls would benefit the visiting public and even more baffled an argument is being made that observing this vista is an inherent right of humanity absent the human cost.

Regardless of one’s position on how to address this issue, the potential for serious injury or death at a few of our major waterfalls, including Albion Falls, has been all too evident over the past number of years.

While it is true the city has an incredible array of beautiful waterfalls and, in many cases, observation of that beauty is undertaken without incident, a few of the more spectacular vistas have become magnets for visitors in part, I am sure, because of the incidents that have occurred there. There is no beauty, no matter how majestic, that surpasses the life-altering injuries and death that have occurred at our major waterfalls.

For a municipality to ignore a known inherent risk could further jeopardize its legal liability and is incongruous with the societal evolution that has brought us stop lights, stop signs, seatbelts etc.

In short, whenever there a perceived risk for the public, we expect our governing bodies to act to address the issue, even if it restricts our rights. Yes, it’s true that because of the actions of a few, many will be impacted, but that is a necessary and intended consequence until such time as a reasonable solution can be found to bridge the public’s ability to view the beauty of Albion Falls and city’s ability it allow it safely.

Let’s give our city staff and politicians credit for addressing this issue and trying to find a balance to address the problem.

Frank Biancucci

Ancaster


LETTER: Restricting waterfall access necessary and intended consequence

Opinion Jul 14, 2017 Ancaster News

Re: City needs to stop the nanny state attitude over our local waterfalls

I am truly amazed by the letter writer’s assertion that a hands-off policy on controlling access to Albion Falls would benefit the visiting public and even more baffled an argument is being made that observing this vista is an inherent right of humanity absent the human cost.

Regardless of one’s position on how to address this issue, the potential for serious injury or death at a few of our major waterfalls, including Albion Falls, has been all too evident over the past number of years.

While it is true the city has an incredible array of beautiful waterfalls and, in many cases, observation of that beauty is undertaken without incident, a few of the more spectacular vistas have become magnets for visitors in part, I am sure, because of the incidents that have occurred there. There is no beauty, no matter how majestic, that surpasses the life-altering injuries and death that have occurred at our major waterfalls.

Related Content

For a municipality to ignore a known inherent risk could further jeopardize its legal liability and is incongruous with the societal evolution that has brought us stop lights, stop signs, seatbelts etc.

In short, whenever there a perceived risk for the public, we expect our governing bodies to act to address the issue, even if it restricts our rights. Yes, it’s true that because of the actions of a few, many will be impacted, but that is a necessary and intended consequence until such time as a reasonable solution can be found to bridge the public’s ability to view the beauty of Albion Falls and city’s ability it allow it safely.

Let’s give our city staff and politicians credit for addressing this issue and trying to find a balance to address the problem.

Frank Biancucci

Ancaster


LETTER: Restricting waterfall access necessary and intended consequence

Opinion Jul 14, 2017 Ancaster News

Re: City needs to stop the nanny state attitude over our local waterfalls

I am truly amazed by the letter writer’s assertion that a hands-off policy on controlling access to Albion Falls would benefit the visiting public and even more baffled an argument is being made that observing this vista is an inherent right of humanity absent the human cost.

Regardless of one’s position on how to address this issue, the potential for serious injury or death at a few of our major waterfalls, including Albion Falls, has been all too evident over the past number of years.

While it is true the city has an incredible array of beautiful waterfalls and, in many cases, observation of that beauty is undertaken without incident, a few of the more spectacular vistas have become magnets for visitors in part, I am sure, because of the incidents that have occurred there. There is no beauty, no matter how majestic, that surpasses the life-altering injuries and death that have occurred at our major waterfalls.

Related Content

For a municipality to ignore a known inherent risk could further jeopardize its legal liability and is incongruous with the societal evolution that has brought us stop lights, stop signs, seatbelts etc.

In short, whenever there a perceived risk for the public, we expect our governing bodies to act to address the issue, even if it restricts our rights. Yes, it’s true that because of the actions of a few, many will be impacted, but that is a necessary and intended consequence until such time as a reasonable solution can be found to bridge the public’s ability to view the beauty of Albion Falls and city’s ability it allow it safely.

Let’s give our city staff and politicians credit for addressing this issue and trying to find a balance to address the problem.

Frank Biancucci

Ancaster