Photo radar is a cash grab that won’t prevent biggest cause of fatal crashes

Opinion Apr 20, 2017 Hamilton Mountain News

If city council is truly concerned about reducing crashes on Hamilton roads, photo radar isn’t the answer. Sadly, council seems to be more interested in milking the cash cow than it is in curbing collisions.

Last week, Hamilton police released a report that found 90 people were killed in 83 fatal crashes from 2012 through February 2017 in the city.

By far the most common contributing factor was inattentiveness — texting and the like — by the driver. In a rather distant second was speed, just ahead of impairment.

The report includes highways within the city limits governed by the OPP, including the QEW and Highway 403. The OPP say careless driving was overwhelmingly the cause of fatal crashes in its local jurisdiction.

Of those 83 fatal crashes in the report, eight were on the Red Hill Valley or Lincoln Alexander parkways. Speed was cited as a contributing factor in three of the deadly crashes, impairment (drugs or alcohol) and inattentiveness were cited in two and a medical condition and weather once each.

With distracted driving being the No. 1 cause of fatal crashes, wouldn’t it make sense to focus more attention on cracking down on those who text and drive rather than those with a lead foot? Instead, some councillors are using the report to try an justify reopening the photo radar cash machine.

Governments are always desperately trying to find new revenue streams. What could be easier than setting up a camera to detect a speeder and sending them a ticket?

Photo radar can reduce speed, but does nothing to reduce fatal crashes. Because the driver does not receive demerit points, there is no true deterrent to the person with more cash than brains from being a menace on Hamilton roads.

If council truly wants to do something to reduce fatal crashes, it will get more officers out to nab the person with their eyes on a screen rather than the road. And those same officers will hand out speeding tickets that include demerit points.

If someday photo radar can clearly identify a vehicle’s driver well enough to punish them properly, then it would be worth revisiting its use. Until then, councillors are just putting on a straight face to say they want to increase safety when really they just want to have their hands in drivers’ wallets.

Is the City looking at bringing back photo radar for safety or financial reasons?
Safety
Financial
Both
QuizMaker
 
 
 
 
 
 

Photo radar is a cash grab that won’t prevent biggest cause of fatal crashes

Opinion Apr 20, 2017 Hamilton Mountain News

If city council is truly concerned about reducing crashes on Hamilton roads, photo radar isn’t the answer. Sadly, council seems to be more interested in milking the cash cow than it is in curbing collisions.

Last week, Hamilton police released a report that found 90 people were killed in 83 fatal crashes from 2012 through February 2017 in the city.

By far the most common contributing factor was inattentiveness — texting and the like — by the driver. In a rather distant second was speed, just ahead of impairment.

The report includes highways within the city limits governed by the OPP, including the QEW and Highway 403. The OPP say careless driving was overwhelmingly the cause of fatal crashes in its local jurisdiction.

Related Content

Of those 83 fatal crashes in the report, eight were on the Red Hill Valley or Lincoln Alexander parkways. Speed was cited as a contributing factor in three of the deadly crashes, impairment (drugs or alcohol) and inattentiveness were cited in two and a medical condition and weather once each.

With distracted driving being the No. 1 cause of fatal crashes, wouldn’t it make sense to focus more attention on cracking down on those who text and drive rather than those with a lead foot? Instead, some councillors are using the report to try an justify reopening the photo radar cash machine.

Governments are always desperately trying to find new revenue streams. What could be easier than setting up a camera to detect a speeder and sending them a ticket?

Photo radar can reduce speed, but does nothing to reduce fatal crashes. Because the driver does not receive demerit points, there is no true deterrent to the person with more cash than brains from being a menace on Hamilton roads.

If council truly wants to do something to reduce fatal crashes, it will get more officers out to nab the person with their eyes on a screen rather than the road. And those same officers will hand out speeding tickets that include demerit points.

If someday photo radar can clearly identify a vehicle’s driver well enough to punish them properly, then it would be worth revisiting its use. Until then, councillors are just putting on a straight face to say they want to increase safety when really they just want to have their hands in drivers’ wallets.

Is the City looking at bringing back photo radar for safety or financial reasons?
Safety
Financial
Both
QuizMaker
 
 
 
 
 
 

Photo radar is a cash grab that won’t prevent biggest cause of fatal crashes

Opinion Apr 20, 2017 Hamilton Mountain News

If city council is truly concerned about reducing crashes on Hamilton roads, photo radar isn’t the answer. Sadly, council seems to be more interested in milking the cash cow than it is in curbing collisions.

Last week, Hamilton police released a report that found 90 people were killed in 83 fatal crashes from 2012 through February 2017 in the city.

By far the most common contributing factor was inattentiveness — texting and the like — by the driver. In a rather distant second was speed, just ahead of impairment.

The report includes highways within the city limits governed by the OPP, including the QEW and Highway 403. The OPP say careless driving was overwhelmingly the cause of fatal crashes in its local jurisdiction.

Related Content

Of those 83 fatal crashes in the report, eight were on the Red Hill Valley or Lincoln Alexander parkways. Speed was cited as a contributing factor in three of the deadly crashes, impairment (drugs or alcohol) and inattentiveness were cited in two and a medical condition and weather once each.

With distracted driving being the No. 1 cause of fatal crashes, wouldn’t it make sense to focus more attention on cracking down on those who text and drive rather than those with a lead foot? Instead, some councillors are using the report to try an justify reopening the photo radar cash machine.

Governments are always desperately trying to find new revenue streams. What could be easier than setting up a camera to detect a speeder and sending them a ticket?

Photo radar can reduce speed, but does nothing to reduce fatal crashes. Because the driver does not receive demerit points, there is no true deterrent to the person with more cash than brains from being a menace on Hamilton roads.

If council truly wants to do something to reduce fatal crashes, it will get more officers out to nab the person with their eyes on a screen rather than the road. And those same officers will hand out speeding tickets that include demerit points.

If someday photo radar can clearly identify a vehicle’s driver well enough to punish them properly, then it would be worth revisiting its use. Until then, councillors are just putting on a straight face to say they want to increase safety when really they just want to have their hands in drivers’ wallets.

Is the City looking at bringing back photo radar for safety or financial reasons?
Safety
Financial
Both
QuizMaker