MOUNTAIN MEMORIES: Terryberry, a Hamilton Mountain heritage name

Opinion Apr 06, 2017 by Robert Williamson Hamilton Mountain News

I began teaching at the brand new Westmount Secondary School  in 1962. There was a student in one of my classes named Terryberry. Having grown up in the lower east city, I thought the name seemed a bit unusual. Little did I realize that the Terryberry name descended from a pioneer family that had once owned all the land within a half-mile radius of Westmount high school or that it was an anglicized phonetic version of the German surname Durenburger.

The name arrived in North America via the state of New Jersey when Stofel (Stephen) Durenburger emigrated there in 1738.

After the American Revolution, his grandson William became a Loyalist and followed thousands of immigrants to the Niagara peninsula, ending up in Barton Township on the Mountain in 1810. He and his wife Anne (Young) settled on 168 acres of land on the south side of Mohawk Road between present day West 5th and Garth streets.

They built a very large two-storey house on the site, but as they quickly became empty nesters, it was converted to an inn to accommodate the busy stagecoach traffic on the Mohawk Trail. The second floor had a large room that could be used for community meetings or dances.

Their son Jacob built a farm house and a sawmill on an extended tract of land from Sanatorium Road to Stone Church Road. He donated a parcel of land so that a district school (S.S. No. 5) could be built in 1882. In time it became known as the Mohawk Trail School.

It is curious to note that the city’s planning department designated the Terryberry district, with its former inn, school, sawmill and large settlement tract, as the Rolston neighbourhood, named for an obscure pioneer and first Hamilton court house crier, from 1830 to 1835. To add further to the confusion, the city’s Terryberry library across Mohawk Road from the Terryberry tract, sits on land that was owned by J.T. Johnson.

The Hamilton Mountain Heritage Society will feature the story of the Terryberry community in more detail at its next public meeting (see below).     

Mountain Memories, written by historian Robert Williamson for the Hamilton Mountain Heritage Society, appears monthly. The society’s next meeting is Thursday, May 18, 7:30 p.m., at Olivet Church, 40 Empress Ave., where Mark Raymond will present “History of the Westmount Neighbourhood and Terryberry Family.” See the society’s website (hamiltonheritage.ca) for information on events and publications.

MOUNTAIN MEMORIES: Terryberry, a Hamilton Mountain heritage name

Opinion Apr 06, 2017 by Robert Williamson Hamilton Mountain News

I began teaching at the brand new Westmount Secondary School  in 1962. There was a student in one of my classes named Terryberry. Having grown up in the lower east city, I thought the name seemed a bit unusual. Little did I realize that the Terryberry name descended from a pioneer family that had once owned all the land within a half-mile radius of Westmount high school or that it was an anglicized phonetic version of the German surname Durenburger.

The name arrived in North America via the state of New Jersey when Stofel (Stephen) Durenburger emigrated there in 1738.

After the American Revolution, his grandson William became a Loyalist and followed thousands of immigrants to the Niagara peninsula, ending up in Barton Township on the Mountain in 1810. He and his wife Anne (Young) settled on 168 acres of land on the south side of Mohawk Road between present day West 5th and Garth streets.

They built a very large two-storey house on the site, but as they quickly became empty nesters, it was converted to an inn to accommodate the busy stagecoach traffic on the Mohawk Trail. The second floor had a large room that could be used for community meetings or dances.

Their son Jacob built a farm house and a sawmill on an extended tract of land from Sanatorium Road to Stone Church Road. He donated a parcel of land so that a district school (S.S. No. 5) could be built in 1882. In time it became known as the Mohawk Trail School.

It is curious to note that the city’s planning department designated the Terryberry district, with its former inn, school, sawmill and large settlement tract, as the Rolston neighbourhood, named for an obscure pioneer and first Hamilton court house crier, from 1830 to 1835. To add further to the confusion, the city’s Terryberry library across Mohawk Road from the Terryberry tract, sits on land that was owned by J.T. Johnson.

The Hamilton Mountain Heritage Society will feature the story of the Terryberry community in more detail at its next public meeting (see below).     

Mountain Memories, written by historian Robert Williamson for the Hamilton Mountain Heritage Society, appears monthly. The society’s next meeting is Thursday, May 18, 7:30 p.m., at Olivet Church, 40 Empress Ave., where Mark Raymond will present “History of the Westmount Neighbourhood and Terryberry Family.” See the society’s website (hamiltonheritage.ca) for information on events and publications.

MOUNTAIN MEMORIES: Terryberry, a Hamilton Mountain heritage name

Opinion Apr 06, 2017 by Robert Williamson Hamilton Mountain News

I began teaching at the brand new Westmount Secondary School  in 1962. There was a student in one of my classes named Terryberry. Having grown up in the lower east city, I thought the name seemed a bit unusual. Little did I realize that the Terryberry name descended from a pioneer family that had once owned all the land within a half-mile radius of Westmount high school or that it was an anglicized phonetic version of the German surname Durenburger.

The name arrived in North America via the state of New Jersey when Stofel (Stephen) Durenburger emigrated there in 1738.

After the American Revolution, his grandson William became a Loyalist and followed thousands of immigrants to the Niagara peninsula, ending up in Barton Township on the Mountain in 1810. He and his wife Anne (Young) settled on 168 acres of land on the south side of Mohawk Road between present day West 5th and Garth streets.

They built a very large two-storey house on the site, but as they quickly became empty nesters, it was converted to an inn to accommodate the busy stagecoach traffic on the Mohawk Trail. The second floor had a large room that could be used for community meetings or dances.

Their son Jacob built a farm house and a sawmill on an extended tract of land from Sanatorium Road to Stone Church Road. He donated a parcel of land so that a district school (S.S. No. 5) could be built in 1882. In time it became known as the Mohawk Trail School.

It is curious to note that the city’s planning department designated the Terryberry district, with its former inn, school, sawmill and large settlement tract, as the Rolston neighbourhood, named for an obscure pioneer and first Hamilton court house crier, from 1830 to 1835. To add further to the confusion, the city’s Terryberry library across Mohawk Road from the Terryberry tract, sits on land that was owned by J.T. Johnson.

The Hamilton Mountain Heritage Society will feature the story of the Terryberry community in more detail at its next public meeting (see below).     

Mountain Memories, written by historian Robert Williamson for the Hamilton Mountain Heritage Society, appears monthly. The society’s next meeting is Thursday, May 18, 7:30 p.m., at Olivet Church, 40 Empress Ave., where Mark Raymond will present “History of the Westmount Neighbourhood and Terryberry Family.” See the society’s website (hamiltonheritage.ca) for information on events and publications.