Life lessons learned from my dad

Opinion Jun 18, 2015 by Barry Coe Ancaster News

As a newly retired grandfather I found myself watching with pride my son Ryan and his boys. However, it also made me feel guilty at how little I did with him and his sister Julia back in the good old days. At least by being a grandfather I have the opportunity to be more supportive and interactive with the next generation.

I would think that, like the majority of people, your relationship with your father is unique and a mix of both good and bad. I recall Paul Peterson of the Donna Reed Show, singing “My Dad” which always brought a lump to my throat. Of interest did you ever notice how many songs refer to mom as opposed to dad? Speaks volumes doesn’t it?

Just a year ago I was laughing with Hamilton Centre MP David Christopherson about our fathers and the distinct brand of honesty only fathers can bestow upon their sons.

David shared with me that when he informed his dad about running for political office his dad shouted: “Who the hell do you think is going to vote for you? You didn’t even finish high school!”

With my dear old dad it was similar when I announced I was going to seek a career outside of radio. His response was: “Who in God’s name is going to hire an ex-radio announcer? You sat in a tiny room talking to yourself for four hours a day!” Only a loving dad can be so refreshingly honest.

And yet Dad would drive from Brampton to Woodstock once a week to tune in my evening radio programme when I worked my first radio job at CKOX in Woodstock.

I remember my dear mom asking dad to chat with me about the birds and bees because I was going steady with Susan, my wife now of 43 years. Boy was that a brief conversation, not fit for publication, but pretty funny and embarrassing to say the least.

I remember Dad taking time off from work to see my brother and I play against each other in high school football. I made it into the record books that day by allowing more touchdowns as a defensive end than anyone could remember. Dad kindly didn’t remind me that my brother, the opposing quarterback, made it into the record book for the opposite reason.

Dad was also an alcoholic which made the teenage years a challenge. We coped and he quit his addiction cold turkey and went on the speaking circuit to advise young, up and coming executives about the perils of alcoholism.

When I left home for my first job he advised me to “always live within your means and never spend more than you make.”

Perhaps most important gift he gave his boys was self confidence. Through encouragement and example he showed us we could accomplish whatever we wanted to, or as Dad phrased it: “Remember who you are and not what people want you to be”

This Father’s Day give your dad a hug and accept him for who he is, good times and bad.

Happy Father’s Day Dad, I still miss you.

Barry Coe is a media relations consultant and board member with the CHML Children’s Fund.

Life lessons learned from my dad

Opinion Jun 18, 2015 by Barry Coe Ancaster News

As a newly retired grandfather I found myself watching with pride my son Ryan and his boys. However, it also made me feel guilty at how little I did with him and his sister Julia back in the good old days. At least by being a grandfather I have the opportunity to be more supportive and interactive with the next generation.

I would think that, like the majority of people, your relationship with your father is unique and a mix of both good and bad. I recall Paul Peterson of the Donna Reed Show, singing “My Dad” which always brought a lump to my throat. Of interest did you ever notice how many songs refer to mom as opposed to dad? Speaks volumes doesn’t it?

Just a year ago I was laughing with Hamilton Centre MP David Christopherson about our fathers and the distinct brand of honesty only fathers can bestow upon their sons.

David shared with me that when he informed his dad about running for political office his dad shouted: “Who the hell do you think is going to vote for you? You didn’t even finish high school!”

“Who in God’s name is going to hire an ex-radio announcer? You sat in a tiny room talking to yourself for four hours a day!” Only a loving dad can be so refreshingly honest.

With my dear old dad it was similar when I announced I was going to seek a career outside of radio. His response was: “Who in God’s name is going to hire an ex-radio announcer? You sat in a tiny room talking to yourself for four hours a day!” Only a loving dad can be so refreshingly honest.

And yet Dad would drive from Brampton to Woodstock once a week to tune in my evening radio programme when I worked my first radio job at CKOX in Woodstock.

I remember my dear mom asking dad to chat with me about the birds and bees because I was going steady with Susan, my wife now of 43 years. Boy was that a brief conversation, not fit for publication, but pretty funny and embarrassing to say the least.

I remember Dad taking time off from work to see my brother and I play against each other in high school football. I made it into the record books that day by allowing more touchdowns as a defensive end than anyone could remember. Dad kindly didn’t remind me that my brother, the opposing quarterback, made it into the record book for the opposite reason.

Dad was also an alcoholic which made the teenage years a challenge. We coped and he quit his addiction cold turkey and went on the speaking circuit to advise young, up and coming executives about the perils of alcoholism.

When I left home for my first job he advised me to “always live within your means and never spend more than you make.”

Perhaps most important gift he gave his boys was self confidence. Through encouragement and example he showed us we could accomplish whatever we wanted to, or as Dad phrased it: “Remember who you are and not what people want you to be”

This Father’s Day give your dad a hug and accept him for who he is, good times and bad.

Happy Father’s Day Dad, I still miss you.

Barry Coe is a media relations consultant and board member with the CHML Children’s Fund.

Life lessons learned from my dad

Opinion Jun 18, 2015 by Barry Coe Ancaster News

As a newly retired grandfather I found myself watching with pride my son Ryan and his boys. However, it also made me feel guilty at how little I did with him and his sister Julia back in the good old days. At least by being a grandfather I have the opportunity to be more supportive and interactive with the next generation.

I would think that, like the majority of people, your relationship with your father is unique and a mix of both good and bad. I recall Paul Peterson of the Donna Reed Show, singing “My Dad” which always brought a lump to my throat. Of interest did you ever notice how many songs refer to mom as opposed to dad? Speaks volumes doesn’t it?

Just a year ago I was laughing with Hamilton Centre MP David Christopherson about our fathers and the distinct brand of honesty only fathers can bestow upon their sons.

David shared with me that when he informed his dad about running for political office his dad shouted: “Who the hell do you think is going to vote for you? You didn’t even finish high school!”

“Who in God’s name is going to hire an ex-radio announcer? You sat in a tiny room talking to yourself for four hours a day!” Only a loving dad can be so refreshingly honest.

With my dear old dad it was similar when I announced I was going to seek a career outside of radio. His response was: “Who in God’s name is going to hire an ex-radio announcer? You sat in a tiny room talking to yourself for four hours a day!” Only a loving dad can be so refreshingly honest.

And yet Dad would drive from Brampton to Woodstock once a week to tune in my evening radio programme when I worked my first radio job at CKOX in Woodstock.

I remember my dear mom asking dad to chat with me about the birds and bees because I was going steady with Susan, my wife now of 43 years. Boy was that a brief conversation, not fit for publication, but pretty funny and embarrassing to say the least.

I remember Dad taking time off from work to see my brother and I play against each other in high school football. I made it into the record books that day by allowing more touchdowns as a defensive end than anyone could remember. Dad kindly didn’t remind me that my brother, the opposing quarterback, made it into the record book for the opposite reason.

Dad was also an alcoholic which made the teenage years a challenge. We coped and he quit his addiction cold turkey and went on the speaking circuit to advise young, up and coming executives about the perils of alcoholism.

When I left home for my first job he advised me to “always live within your means and never spend more than you make.”

Perhaps most important gift he gave his boys was self confidence. Through encouragement and example he showed us we could accomplish whatever we wanted to, or as Dad phrased it: “Remember who you are and not what people want you to be”

This Father’s Day give your dad a hug and accept him for who he is, good times and bad.

Happy Father’s Day Dad, I still miss you.

Barry Coe is a media relations consultant and board member with the CHML Children’s Fund.