Hamilton council fast and furious over cars and guns

Opinion May 28, 2015 Stoney Creek News

Guns and cars may not be related, but both are causing considerable angst among Hamilton politicians.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger, out of a sense of frustration from the previous weekend’s brazen daylight shooting spree along Main Street East, blurted out that maybe the municipality should consider banning guns within its borders. Former Toronto mayor David Miller pushed through a bylaw in 2008 that banned gun clubs within the city, and Hogtown mayoral hopeful Olivia Chow talked about wanting the federal government to ban handguns last year, but gun play within that metropolis has continued unimpeded.

Yet that didn’t stop Eisenberger from asking the city’s solicitor to examine if the city can pass a bylaw.

“I wonder if we can’t prevent idiots from having guns in our city,” said Eisenberger. “Anything we can do to prevent people from having guns in our community I think that would be a positive step.”

In a Utopian world, taking guns out of some people’s hands who shouldn’t handle a sharp pencil let along a loaded Glock would be a “positive” step, but reality dictates otherwise.

That doesn’t mean the city is powerless when it comes to taking action against dumb people with a weapon. While gun violence remains a predominately a downtown Hamilton expectation, in the suburban areas the deadly weapon putting people at risk is the family car.

Ask any councillor, or traffic official about the biggest fear residents in upper Stoney Creek, or Ancaster face and they will tell you it’s the speeding motorist hell bent on exceeding the 50 km speed limit that gives them nightmares.

Stop signs are merely ornaments to these craven imbeciles, and speed humps mere obstacles to their goal of getting home the fastest way possible.

Yet Hamilton’s traffic staff is slowly unveiling a comprehensive education program to put a halt to the speed demon. Throughout this year, staff will be installing lawn signs to warn motorists to slow down; school safety zones; elaborate flashing lights and road markings to provide further warnings to lead foots to ease up. The province is also getting involved with Bill 31, which promises higher fines, extensive pedestrian walkways and safer streets.

While talking about banning guns is a knee-jerk reaction that does nothing to get at the root causes of the violence in downtown Hamilton, the city’s comprehensive traffic program to get motorists to slow down is a proper, co-operative and multi-faceted approach that may not end a scourge in the suburbs, but will certainly reduce the risk of children and adults who just want to be able to walk to the nearby park without getting run over.

Hamilton council fast and furious over cars and guns

Opinion May 28, 2015 Stoney Creek News

Guns and cars may not be related, but both are causing considerable angst among Hamilton politicians.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger, out of a sense of frustration from the previous weekend’s brazen daylight shooting spree along Main Street East, blurted out that maybe the municipality should consider banning guns within its borders. Former Toronto mayor David Miller pushed through a bylaw in 2008 that banned gun clubs within the city, and Hogtown mayoral hopeful Olivia Chow talked about wanting the federal government to ban handguns last year, but gun play within that metropolis has continued unimpeded.

Yet that didn’t stop Eisenberger from asking the city’s solicitor to examine if the city can pass a bylaw.

“I wonder if we can’t prevent idiots from having guns in our city,” said Eisenberger. “Anything we can do to prevent people from having guns in our community I think that would be a positive step.”

In a Utopian world, taking guns out of some people’s hands who shouldn’t handle a sharp pencil let along a loaded Glock would be a “positive” step, but reality dictates otherwise.

That doesn’t mean the city is powerless when it comes to taking action against dumb people with a weapon. While gun violence remains a predominately a downtown Hamilton expectation, in the suburban areas the deadly weapon putting people at risk is the family car.

Ask any councillor, or traffic official about the biggest fear residents in upper Stoney Creek, or Ancaster face and they will tell you it’s the speeding motorist hell bent on exceeding the 50 km speed limit that gives them nightmares.

Stop signs are merely ornaments to these craven imbeciles, and speed humps mere obstacles to their goal of getting home the fastest way possible.

Yet Hamilton’s traffic staff is slowly unveiling a comprehensive education program to put a halt to the speed demon. Throughout this year, staff will be installing lawn signs to warn motorists to slow down; school safety zones; elaborate flashing lights and road markings to provide further warnings to lead foots to ease up. The province is also getting involved with Bill 31, which promises higher fines, extensive pedestrian walkways and safer streets.

While talking about banning guns is a knee-jerk reaction that does nothing to get at the root causes of the violence in downtown Hamilton, the city’s comprehensive traffic program to get motorists to slow down is a proper, co-operative and multi-faceted approach that may not end a scourge in the suburbs, but will certainly reduce the risk of children and adults who just want to be able to walk to the nearby park without getting run over.

Hamilton council fast and furious over cars and guns

Opinion May 28, 2015 Stoney Creek News

Guns and cars may not be related, but both are causing considerable angst among Hamilton politicians.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger, out of a sense of frustration from the previous weekend’s brazen daylight shooting spree along Main Street East, blurted out that maybe the municipality should consider banning guns within its borders. Former Toronto mayor David Miller pushed through a bylaw in 2008 that banned gun clubs within the city, and Hogtown mayoral hopeful Olivia Chow talked about wanting the federal government to ban handguns last year, but gun play within that metropolis has continued unimpeded.

Yet that didn’t stop Eisenberger from asking the city’s solicitor to examine if the city can pass a bylaw.

“I wonder if we can’t prevent idiots from having guns in our city,” said Eisenberger. “Anything we can do to prevent people from having guns in our community I think that would be a positive step.”

In a Utopian world, taking guns out of some people’s hands who shouldn’t handle a sharp pencil let along a loaded Glock would be a “positive” step, but reality dictates otherwise.

That doesn’t mean the city is powerless when it comes to taking action against dumb people with a weapon. While gun violence remains a predominately a downtown Hamilton expectation, in the suburban areas the deadly weapon putting people at risk is the family car.

Ask any councillor, or traffic official about the biggest fear residents in upper Stoney Creek, or Ancaster face and they will tell you it’s the speeding motorist hell bent on exceeding the 50 km speed limit that gives them nightmares.

Stop signs are merely ornaments to these craven imbeciles, and speed humps mere obstacles to their goal of getting home the fastest way possible.

Yet Hamilton’s traffic staff is slowly unveiling a comprehensive education program to put a halt to the speed demon. Throughout this year, staff will be installing lawn signs to warn motorists to slow down; school safety zones; elaborate flashing lights and road markings to provide further warnings to lead foots to ease up. The province is also getting involved with Bill 31, which promises higher fines, extensive pedestrian walkways and safer streets.

While talking about banning guns is a knee-jerk reaction that does nothing to get at the root causes of the violence in downtown Hamilton, the city’s comprehensive traffic program to get motorists to slow down is a proper, co-operative and multi-faceted approach that may not end a scourge in the suburbs, but will certainly reduce the risk of children and adults who just want to be able to walk to the nearby park without getting run over.