GROWING GREEN: Add some edibles to your pots and urns

Opinion May 08, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

Consider adding veggies to your decorative pots to add drama, texture, colour and taste to your outdoor eating area.

First, select a suitable container. Larger plants such as tomatoes, corn, and eggplant require something the size of a bushel basket, while lettuces and herbs are fine in a hanging basket. Ensure your container has holes for drainage and fill it with bagged potting soil. For nutrients, I apply a liquid fish emulsion fertilizer every two weeks. And remember pots require more frequent watering than garden plants, so check them daily.

Determinate tomatoes are good choices for pots. Look for Patio, Pixie, Tiny Tim, Toy Boy, Tumbling Tom, Jasper and Litt’l Bites.

Peppers love pots because the soil is warmer. Try Sweet Banana, Right On Red Pepper, or Pretty N Sweet.

For hot peppers, try Long Slim, Cayenne, Thai Hot Pepper or Black Pearl.

Miniature eggplants such as Little Fingers are ideal for pots and look gorgeous. Add faster growing crops such as greens and herbs around the edges.

Ornamental foliage adds beauty as well as bounty. Include Ruby Glow romaine lettuce, Bright Lights swiss chard, and Bull’s Blood beets. Kales come in silvery blues and dark reds with shapes that range from statuesque to mounding.

Cucumbers and beans can be grown on a deck if you add chicken wire for them to climb on. Good choices include Salad Bush, Spacemaster and Bush Pickle cukes, and Blue Lake, Kentucky Wonder and French Dwarf beans.

Or get creative and grow a salsa garden with basil, onions, tomatoes, cilantro and hot peppers. The choices are only limited by your imagination.

Growing Green is a regular feature written by the Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society (gardenontario.org/site.php/mhhs). Rita Bailey, the author of this report, is a member who gardens in downtown Hamilton, where she mixes vegetables, herbs, and flowers in her kitchen garden.

GROWING GREEN: Add some edibles to your pots and urns

Consider adding veggies to your decorative pots to add drama, texture, colour and taste to your outdoor eating area.

Opinion May 08, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

Consider adding veggies to your decorative pots to add drama, texture, colour and taste to your outdoor eating area.

First, select a suitable container. Larger plants such as tomatoes, corn, and eggplant require something the size of a bushel basket, while lettuces and herbs are fine in a hanging basket. Ensure your container has holes for drainage and fill it with bagged potting soil. For nutrients, I apply a liquid fish emulsion fertilizer every two weeks. And remember pots require more frequent watering than garden plants, so check them daily.

Determinate tomatoes are good choices for pots. Look for Patio, Pixie, Tiny Tim, Toy Boy, Tumbling Tom, Jasper and Litt’l Bites.

Peppers love pots because the soil is warmer. Try Sweet Banana, Right On Red Pepper, or Pretty N Sweet.

Miniature eggplants such as Little Fingers are ideal for pots and look gorgeous. Add faster growing crops such as greens and herbs around the edges.

For hot peppers, try Long Slim, Cayenne, Thai Hot Pepper or Black Pearl.

Miniature eggplants such as Little Fingers are ideal for pots and look gorgeous. Add faster growing crops such as greens and herbs around the edges.

Ornamental foliage adds beauty as well as bounty. Include Ruby Glow romaine lettuce, Bright Lights swiss chard, and Bull’s Blood beets. Kales come in silvery blues and dark reds with shapes that range from statuesque to mounding.

Cucumbers and beans can be grown on a deck if you add chicken wire for them to climb on. Good choices include Salad Bush, Spacemaster and Bush Pickle cukes, and Blue Lake, Kentucky Wonder and French Dwarf beans.

Or get creative and grow a salsa garden with basil, onions, tomatoes, cilantro and hot peppers. The choices are only limited by your imagination.

Growing Green is a regular feature written by the Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society (gardenontario.org/site.php/mhhs). Rita Bailey, the author of this report, is a member who gardens in downtown Hamilton, where she mixes vegetables, herbs, and flowers in her kitchen garden.

GROWING GREEN: Add some edibles to your pots and urns

Consider adding veggies to your decorative pots to add drama, texture, colour and taste to your outdoor eating area.

Opinion May 08, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

Consider adding veggies to your decorative pots to add drama, texture, colour and taste to your outdoor eating area.

First, select a suitable container. Larger plants such as tomatoes, corn, and eggplant require something the size of a bushel basket, while lettuces and herbs are fine in a hanging basket. Ensure your container has holes for drainage and fill it with bagged potting soil. For nutrients, I apply a liquid fish emulsion fertilizer every two weeks. And remember pots require more frequent watering than garden plants, so check them daily.

Determinate tomatoes are good choices for pots. Look for Patio, Pixie, Tiny Tim, Toy Boy, Tumbling Tom, Jasper and Litt’l Bites.

Peppers love pots because the soil is warmer. Try Sweet Banana, Right On Red Pepper, or Pretty N Sweet.

Miniature eggplants such as Little Fingers are ideal for pots and look gorgeous. Add faster growing crops such as greens and herbs around the edges.

For hot peppers, try Long Slim, Cayenne, Thai Hot Pepper or Black Pearl.

Miniature eggplants such as Little Fingers are ideal for pots and look gorgeous. Add faster growing crops such as greens and herbs around the edges.

Ornamental foliage adds beauty as well as bounty. Include Ruby Glow romaine lettuce, Bright Lights swiss chard, and Bull’s Blood beets. Kales come in silvery blues and dark reds with shapes that range from statuesque to mounding.

Cucumbers and beans can be grown on a deck if you add chicken wire for them to climb on. Good choices include Salad Bush, Spacemaster and Bush Pickle cukes, and Blue Lake, Kentucky Wonder and French Dwarf beans.

Or get creative and grow a salsa garden with basil, onions, tomatoes, cilantro and hot peppers. The choices are only limited by your imagination.

Growing Green is a regular feature written by the Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society (gardenontario.org/site.php/mhhs). Rita Bailey, the author of this report, is a member who gardens in downtown Hamilton, where she mixes vegetables, herbs, and flowers in her kitchen garden.