Hamilton vs. Canada Post and its super mailboxes

Opinion Apr 30, 2015 Ancaster News

There is a sense of desperation by Canada Post as it attempts to justify its ham-handed methods of installing the new super boxes across Hamilton Mountain.

Last Friday, Canada Post filed a motion in Ontario Superior Court seeking to declare invalid the City of Hamilton’s recently approved bylaw amendment that mandates that Canada Post pay a $200 permit fee for the installation of the super mails boxes on municipal property.

A few days earlier, the city fired a salvo against Canada Post asking the court to halt the installation of the super mail boxes, even after the bylaw was approved.

Canada Post believes it is free of all municipal constraints under the Canada Post Corporation Act and can do what it likes on municipal property. Officials contend the agency has the “legal authority to install Community Mailboxes on municipality-owned property.”

As the city’s legal official stated, that remains to be seen, and should pose an intriguing Constitutional question.

Hamilton’s argument is that since it regulates other utilities on its property, such as telephone and gas lines, Canada Post is no different. Hamilton officials are not saying Canada Post can’t install their mail boxes; instead the city wants Canada Post to provide appropriate funding to cover needed expenses, and allow for a productive consultative process to allow the installations to take place. Both of those requests from the municipality have fallen on Canada Post’s deaf ears, despite their pleas that they have been meeting repeatedly with city officials to resolve issues.

Of course, that argument fell by the wayside when soon after Hamilton council approved the bylaw, Canada Post and its contractors accelerated their installation efforts.

Mountain councillors have had a number of meetings with Canada Post officials since last summer as they try to mitigate the impacts of the transition from door-to-door delivery to super mail boxes Canada Post officials have told councillors halting the transition are not going to happen.

Canada Post has continued to trumpet its need to install the mail boxes to “preserve the postal service for all Canadians.” Hamilton isn’t contradicting the goals of Canada Post, but only the methods by which the agency is enforcing its mandate.

A court decision on the powers and methods of Canada Post would seem to be the appropriate place to decide who has authority over public property, the residents of Hamilton or a mindless, bureaucratic agency such as Canada Post beholden to only the federal government’s bottom-line mandate.

Hamilton vs. Canada Post and its super mailboxes

Opinion Apr 30, 2015 Ancaster News

There is a sense of desperation by Canada Post as it attempts to justify its ham-handed methods of installing the new super boxes across Hamilton Mountain.

Last Friday, Canada Post filed a motion in Ontario Superior Court seeking to declare invalid the City of Hamilton’s recently approved bylaw amendment that mandates that Canada Post pay a $200 permit fee for the installation of the super mails boxes on municipal property.

A few days earlier, the city fired a salvo against Canada Post asking the court to halt the installation of the super mail boxes, even after the bylaw was approved.

Canada Post believes it is free of all municipal constraints under the Canada Post Corporation Act and can do what it likes on municipal property. Officials contend the agency has the “legal authority to install Community Mailboxes on municipality-owned property.”

As the city’s legal official stated, that remains to be seen, and should pose an intriguing Constitutional question.

Hamilton’s argument is that since it regulates other utilities on its property, such as telephone and gas lines, Canada Post is no different. Hamilton officials are not saying Canada Post can’t install their mail boxes; instead the city wants Canada Post to provide appropriate funding to cover needed expenses, and allow for a productive consultative process to allow the installations to take place. Both of those requests from the municipality have fallen on Canada Post’s deaf ears, despite their pleas that they have been meeting repeatedly with city officials to resolve issues.

Of course, that argument fell by the wayside when soon after Hamilton council approved the bylaw, Canada Post and its contractors accelerated their installation efforts.

Mountain councillors have had a number of meetings with Canada Post officials since last summer as they try to mitigate the impacts of the transition from door-to-door delivery to super mail boxes Canada Post officials have told councillors halting the transition are not going to happen.

Canada Post has continued to trumpet its need to install the mail boxes to “preserve the postal service for all Canadians.” Hamilton isn’t contradicting the goals of Canada Post, but only the methods by which the agency is enforcing its mandate.

A court decision on the powers and methods of Canada Post would seem to be the appropriate place to decide who has authority over public property, the residents of Hamilton or a mindless, bureaucratic agency such as Canada Post beholden to only the federal government’s bottom-line mandate.

Hamilton vs. Canada Post and its super mailboxes

Opinion Apr 30, 2015 Ancaster News

There is a sense of desperation by Canada Post as it attempts to justify its ham-handed methods of installing the new super boxes across Hamilton Mountain.

Last Friday, Canada Post filed a motion in Ontario Superior Court seeking to declare invalid the City of Hamilton’s recently approved bylaw amendment that mandates that Canada Post pay a $200 permit fee for the installation of the super mails boxes on municipal property.

A few days earlier, the city fired a salvo against Canada Post asking the court to halt the installation of the super mail boxes, even after the bylaw was approved.

Canada Post believes it is free of all municipal constraints under the Canada Post Corporation Act and can do what it likes on municipal property. Officials contend the agency has the “legal authority to install Community Mailboxes on municipality-owned property.”

As the city’s legal official stated, that remains to be seen, and should pose an intriguing Constitutional question.

Hamilton’s argument is that since it regulates other utilities on its property, such as telephone and gas lines, Canada Post is no different. Hamilton officials are not saying Canada Post can’t install their mail boxes; instead the city wants Canada Post to provide appropriate funding to cover needed expenses, and allow for a productive consultative process to allow the installations to take place. Both of those requests from the municipality have fallen on Canada Post’s deaf ears, despite their pleas that they have been meeting repeatedly with city officials to resolve issues.

Of course, that argument fell by the wayside when soon after Hamilton council approved the bylaw, Canada Post and its contractors accelerated their installation efforts.

Mountain councillors have had a number of meetings with Canada Post officials since last summer as they try to mitigate the impacts of the transition from door-to-door delivery to super mail boxes Canada Post officials have told councillors halting the transition are not going to happen.

Canada Post has continued to trumpet its need to install the mail boxes to “preserve the postal service for all Canadians.” Hamilton isn’t contradicting the goals of Canada Post, but only the methods by which the agency is enforcing its mandate.

A court decision on the powers and methods of Canada Post would seem to be the appropriate place to decide who has authority over public property, the residents of Hamilton or a mindless, bureaucratic agency such as Canada Post beholden to only the federal government’s bottom-line mandate.