GROWING GREEN: Most wonderful time of the gardening year

Opinion Apr 15, 2015 by Margaret Verbeek Hamilton Mountain News

This is an exciting time for a gardener.

Birds are returning and bulbs peek out of the ground. The snow drops are blooming and winter aconite quickly follows. The bird bath comes out, clean up begins, garden furniture makes its way outdoors and some days it’s all about sitting in a sheltered spot enjoying the sun on your face.

Visits to garden shows and garden centres feed your soul. It’s the time to prep and plan.

As I plan my garden, I think about the begonia — a wonderful plant for the house and garden and looks good all season long.

I knew about a few types, but the American Begonia Society reports eight types of begonias. Four of my favorites are cane, semperflorens, tuberous and rex begonias.

The cane begonia (Angel Wing) gets its name from the look of the stem. Leaves often have spots or splashes on them. Blooms come in large clusters and may be fragrant.  I’ve grown one indoors for at least a decade, but this year I’m going to experiment using it outdoors in pots that are all about leaf shape and colour.

Semperflorens begonias (wax begonia) are widely grown and make an excellent substitute for impatiens. You’ll find varieties with white, pink and red blooms and either green or burgundy leaves.

Tuberous begonias are fantastic in pots – once they start blooming they don’t stop. Mine kept getting better all season long and lasted until frost. Sometimes they are all the garden can offer late in the season. Colors come in white, yellow, pink, red.

Rex begonias. You don’t get more royal than this! They offer phenomenal leaf colour, pattern and shape. They bloom, but are not grown for this reason. It’s all about the leaf!

There are quiet spots in my garden that aren’t suited for showy annuals and this is where the rexes shine.

As you plan your garden, think about incorporating begonias – you won’t regret it!

Growing Green is a regular feature prepared by the Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society (gardenontario.org/site.php/mhhs). This week’s column was written by Margaret Verbeek, treasurer of the society.

GROWING GREEN: Most wonderful time of the gardening year

It’s the time to prep and plan

Opinion Apr 15, 2015 by Margaret Verbeek Hamilton Mountain News

This is an exciting time for a gardener.

Birds are returning and bulbs peek out of the ground. The snow drops are blooming and winter aconite quickly follows. The bird bath comes out, clean up begins, garden furniture makes its way outdoors and some days it’s all about sitting in a sheltered spot enjoying the sun on your face.

Visits to garden shows and garden centres feed your soul. It’s the time to prep and plan.

As I plan my garden, I think about the begonia — a wonderful plant for the house and garden and looks good all season long.

As I plan my garden, I think about the begonia — a wonderful plant for the house and garden and looks good all season long.

I knew about a few types, but the American Begonia Society reports eight types of begonias. Four of my favorites are cane, semperflorens, tuberous and rex begonias.

The cane begonia (Angel Wing) gets its name from the look of the stem. Leaves often have spots or splashes on them. Blooms come in large clusters and may be fragrant.  I’ve grown one indoors for at least a decade, but this year I’m going to experiment using it outdoors in pots that are all about leaf shape and colour.

Semperflorens begonias (wax begonia) are widely grown and make an excellent substitute for impatiens. You’ll find varieties with white, pink and red blooms and either green or burgundy leaves.

Tuberous begonias are fantastic in pots – once they start blooming they don’t stop. Mine kept getting better all season long and lasted until frost. Sometimes they are all the garden can offer late in the season. Colors come in white, yellow, pink, red.

Rex begonias. You don’t get more royal than this! They offer phenomenal leaf colour, pattern and shape. They bloom, but are not grown for this reason. It’s all about the leaf!

There are quiet spots in my garden that aren’t suited for showy annuals and this is where the rexes shine.

As you plan your garden, think about incorporating begonias – you won’t regret it!

Growing Green is a regular feature prepared by the Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society (gardenontario.org/site.php/mhhs). This week’s column was written by Margaret Verbeek, treasurer of the society.

GROWING GREEN: Most wonderful time of the gardening year

It’s the time to prep and plan

Opinion Apr 15, 2015 by Margaret Verbeek Hamilton Mountain News

This is an exciting time for a gardener.

Birds are returning and bulbs peek out of the ground. The snow drops are blooming and winter aconite quickly follows. The bird bath comes out, clean up begins, garden furniture makes its way outdoors and some days it’s all about sitting in a sheltered spot enjoying the sun on your face.

Visits to garden shows and garden centres feed your soul. It’s the time to prep and plan.

As I plan my garden, I think about the begonia — a wonderful plant for the house and garden and looks good all season long.

As I plan my garden, I think about the begonia — a wonderful plant for the house and garden and looks good all season long.

I knew about a few types, but the American Begonia Society reports eight types of begonias. Four of my favorites are cane, semperflorens, tuberous and rex begonias.

The cane begonia (Angel Wing) gets its name from the look of the stem. Leaves often have spots or splashes on them. Blooms come in large clusters and may be fragrant.  I’ve grown one indoors for at least a decade, but this year I’m going to experiment using it outdoors in pots that are all about leaf shape and colour.

Semperflorens begonias (wax begonia) are widely grown and make an excellent substitute for impatiens. You’ll find varieties with white, pink and red blooms and either green or burgundy leaves.

Tuberous begonias are fantastic in pots – once they start blooming they don’t stop. Mine kept getting better all season long and lasted until frost. Sometimes they are all the garden can offer late in the season. Colors come in white, yellow, pink, red.

Rex begonias. You don’t get more royal than this! They offer phenomenal leaf colour, pattern and shape. They bloom, but are not grown for this reason. It’s all about the leaf!

There are quiet spots in my garden that aren’t suited for showy annuals and this is where the rexes shine.

As you plan your garden, think about incorporating begonias – you won’t regret it!

Growing Green is a regular feature prepared by the Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society (gardenontario.org/site.php/mhhs). This week’s column was written by Margaret Verbeek, treasurer of the society.