Column: One year later, the transition from work to retirement continues

Opinion Mar 26, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

With the arrival of spring and the departure of the snow, the end of March will signify the conclusion of my first year of retirement.

I must confess that the year has flown by. Upon my retirement my valued number one at Mission Services, Liz Teeninga, gifted me with a journal to record my thoughts in my new status as a retiree.

From an advice perspective, I strongly encourage you to write down your thoughts as the retirement journey unfolds. It was interesting to review my journal this week, so thanks again Liz for the gift.

So what have I noted about this first year of reinvention?

I have still retained my gratitude for the many wonderful experiences I had during my working career, either in the media or the human service sector. I feel I was very fortunate to have worked from 1970 through 2013 during an era of such dramatic technological and social change. The experiences I had enabled me to share true life solutions and options to a new generation facing even more challenges than I could ever have imagined.

I was surprised at how quickly I transitioned from the world of work. My scope of interests changed so rapidly. Family, friends and faith became even more important to me and I appreciated simple every day things to a greater depth. I take great joy in sharing a coffee with a young CEO who remarks when he leaves: “Thank you for sharing your experience. I always come away with one thought I can use when we meet.” What more could one ask for?

As a new board member, it was refreshing to witness first hand through the CHML Children’s Fund that compassion, commitment and community-building is still in fashion with the next generation of communicators. I come away from our meetings energized and refreshed, a benefit of engagement with younger people that I strongly endorse for all retirees.

Retirement can also be a longing for the past, old relationships, cherished modes of accomplishing things and discomfort with new modes of communication. There is nothing wrong with visiting the past and lamenting old values, but we must adapt and adjust. Initially I felt I had betrayed my decision to become a new renaissance man devoid of hand-held communication devices which monopolize your every waking moment. But I quickly adapted to texting as a necessary evil in order to maintain contact with my children, colleagues and clients. However, my values and principles remain the same, I have established communication protocols so that I am not monopolized by cell phones or evolving communication devices.

Regrets? Perhaps not reading as many books as I thought I should, although I did enjoy Martin Short’s biography.

The future? Take each day as a gift, encourage more people to support the CHML Children’s Fund and continue to motivate young people in their quest to make our community a vibrant, inclusive and wonderful society in which to live. Until next time....

— Barry Coe, is a retiree and a board member of the CHML Children’s Fund.

Column: One year later, the transition from work to retirement continues

Opinion Mar 26, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

With the arrival of spring and the departure of the snow, the end of March will signify the conclusion of my first year of retirement.

I must confess that the year has flown by. Upon my retirement my valued number one at Mission Services, Liz Teeninga, gifted me with a journal to record my thoughts in my new status as a retiree.

From an advice perspective, I strongly encourage you to write down your thoughts as the retirement journey unfolds. It was interesting to review my journal this week, so thanks again Liz for the gift.

So what have I noted about this first year of reinvention?

I have still retained my gratitude for the many wonderful experiences I had during my working career, either in the media or the human service sector. I feel I was very fortunate to have worked from 1970 through 2013 during an era of such dramatic technological and social change. The experiences I had enabled me to share true life solutions and options to a new generation facing even more challenges than I could ever have imagined.

I was surprised at how quickly I transitioned from the world of work. My scope of interests changed so rapidly. Family, friends and faith became even more important to me and I appreciated simple every day things to a greater depth. I take great joy in sharing a coffee with a young CEO who remarks when he leaves: “Thank you for sharing your experience. I always come away with one thought I can use when we meet.” What more could one ask for?

As a new board member, it was refreshing to witness first hand through the CHML Children’s Fund that compassion, commitment and community-building is still in fashion with the next generation of communicators. I come away from our meetings energized and refreshed, a benefit of engagement with younger people that I strongly endorse for all retirees.

Retirement can also be a longing for the past, old relationships, cherished modes of accomplishing things and discomfort with new modes of communication. There is nothing wrong with visiting the past and lamenting old values, but we must adapt and adjust. Initially I felt I had betrayed my decision to become a new renaissance man devoid of hand-held communication devices which monopolize your every waking moment. But I quickly adapted to texting as a necessary evil in order to maintain contact with my children, colleagues and clients. However, my values and principles remain the same, I have established communication protocols so that I am not monopolized by cell phones or evolving communication devices.

Regrets? Perhaps not reading as many books as I thought I should, although I did enjoy Martin Short’s biography.

The future? Take each day as a gift, encourage more people to support the CHML Children’s Fund and continue to motivate young people in their quest to make our community a vibrant, inclusive and wonderful society in which to live. Until next time....

— Barry Coe, is a retiree and a board member of the CHML Children’s Fund.

Column: One year later, the transition from work to retirement continues

Opinion Mar 26, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

With the arrival of spring and the departure of the snow, the end of March will signify the conclusion of my first year of retirement.

I must confess that the year has flown by. Upon my retirement my valued number one at Mission Services, Liz Teeninga, gifted me with a journal to record my thoughts in my new status as a retiree.

From an advice perspective, I strongly encourage you to write down your thoughts as the retirement journey unfolds. It was interesting to review my journal this week, so thanks again Liz for the gift.

So what have I noted about this first year of reinvention?

I have still retained my gratitude for the many wonderful experiences I had during my working career, either in the media or the human service sector. I feel I was very fortunate to have worked from 1970 through 2013 during an era of such dramatic technological and social change. The experiences I had enabled me to share true life solutions and options to a new generation facing even more challenges than I could ever have imagined.

I was surprised at how quickly I transitioned from the world of work. My scope of interests changed so rapidly. Family, friends and faith became even more important to me and I appreciated simple every day things to a greater depth. I take great joy in sharing a coffee with a young CEO who remarks when he leaves: “Thank you for sharing your experience. I always come away with one thought I can use when we meet.” What more could one ask for?

As a new board member, it was refreshing to witness first hand through the CHML Children’s Fund that compassion, commitment and community-building is still in fashion with the next generation of communicators. I come away from our meetings energized and refreshed, a benefit of engagement with younger people that I strongly endorse for all retirees.

Retirement can also be a longing for the past, old relationships, cherished modes of accomplishing things and discomfort with new modes of communication. There is nothing wrong with visiting the past and lamenting old values, but we must adapt and adjust. Initially I felt I had betrayed my decision to become a new renaissance man devoid of hand-held communication devices which monopolize your every waking moment. But I quickly adapted to texting as a necessary evil in order to maintain contact with my children, colleagues and clients. However, my values and principles remain the same, I have established communication protocols so that I am not monopolized by cell phones or evolving communication devices.

Regrets? Perhaps not reading as many books as I thought I should, although I did enjoy Martin Short’s biography.

The future? Take each day as a gift, encourage more people to support the CHML Children’s Fund and continue to motivate young people in their quest to make our community a vibrant, inclusive and wonderful society in which to live. Until next time....

— Barry Coe, is a retiree and a board member of the CHML Children’s Fund.