Editorial: Canada Post’s maddening choice to end door-to-door delivery

Opinion Feb 05, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

If you are looking for the poster child for abysmal government communication and myopic public engagement, look no further than Canada Post.

Since the crown corporation announced its “5-Point Action Plan” a few days before the Christmas holidays in December 2013 — an attempt to downplay its significant message — Canada Post has ignored, stonewalled and dismissed public criticisms about the decision to end door-to-door delivery to about 5-million Canadian households, including in Hamilton.

Hamilton city officials revealed this week that local taxpayers could pay up to $2 million for costs related to installing and maintaining new community mailboxes scheduled to be erected across the Mountain and parts of upper Stoney Creek this spring.

Canada Post will pay the direct costs to install and maintain the boxes, but has only offered to pay $50 per mail box to help offset the costs borne by the city.

But as much as the offer is a slap in the face to residents, of much more significance is how dictatorial Canada Post has become in steamrolling its plans onto the backs of municipalities. Those attempting to fight Canada Post’s plans have ended up on the losing side of the legal argument. Hamilton’s legal options against Canada Post seem futile against a government entity that is hell-bent on reining in “costs.”

Canada Post officials have been quick to respond to the city’s report on community mailboxes, arguing it has done its due diligence when it comes to meeting with politicians and hearing from residents’ concerns. But when Mountain councillors met with Canada Post officials last summer they came away from the get together more frustrated than ever. They characterized the meeting as more perfunctory than anything else on Canada Post’s part since the organization was bulldozing ahead with its plan regardless of what the community desires. The agency continues to use the flawed reasoning for the radical changes that “the world is changing” and places some of the blame for the end of door-to-door delivery on Canadians themselves.

The maniacal focus by Canada Post to cut costs — at the cost of up to 8,000 jobs — with its “action plan” so it can “avoid becoming a drain on taxpayers,” is simply hogwash. Over the last 17 years Canada Post has added to the public purse in every year except 2011. In 2014, the Conference Board of Canada predicted Canada Post would lose $274 million. Instead, it made $13 million.

How’s that for a drain on taxpayers?

 

[poll id="198"]

Editorial: Canada Post’s maddening choice to end door-to-door delivery

Opinion Feb 05, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

If you are looking for the poster child for abysmal government communication and myopic public engagement, look no further than Canada Post.

Since the crown corporation announced its “5-Point Action Plan” a few days before the Christmas holidays in December 2013 — an attempt to downplay its significant message — Canada Post has ignored, stonewalled and dismissed public criticisms about the decision to end door-to-door delivery to about 5-million Canadian households, including in Hamilton.

Hamilton city officials revealed this week that local taxpayers could pay up to $2 million for costs related to installing and maintaining new community mailboxes scheduled to be erected across the Mountain and parts of upper Stoney Creek this spring.

Canada Post will pay the direct costs to install and maintain the boxes, but has only offered to pay $50 per mail box to help offset the costs borne by the city.

But as much as the offer is a slap in the face to residents, of much more significance is how dictatorial Canada Post has become in steamrolling its plans onto the backs of municipalities. Those attempting to fight Canada Post’s plans have ended up on the losing side of the legal argument. Hamilton’s legal options against Canada Post seem futile against a government entity that is hell-bent on reining in “costs.”

Canada Post officials have been quick to respond to the city’s report on community mailboxes, arguing it has done its due diligence when it comes to meeting with politicians and hearing from residents’ concerns. But when Mountain councillors met with Canada Post officials last summer they came away from the get together more frustrated than ever. They characterized the meeting as more perfunctory than anything else on Canada Post’s part since the organization was bulldozing ahead with its plan regardless of what the community desires. The agency continues to use the flawed reasoning for the radical changes that “the world is changing” and places some of the blame for the end of door-to-door delivery on Canadians themselves.

The maniacal focus by Canada Post to cut costs — at the cost of up to 8,000 jobs — with its “action plan” so it can “avoid becoming a drain on taxpayers,” is simply hogwash. Over the last 17 years Canada Post has added to the public purse in every year except 2011. In 2014, the Conference Board of Canada predicted Canada Post would lose $274 million. Instead, it made $13 million.

How’s that for a drain on taxpayers?

 

[poll id="198"]

Editorial: Canada Post’s maddening choice to end door-to-door delivery

Opinion Feb 05, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

If you are looking for the poster child for abysmal government communication and myopic public engagement, look no further than Canada Post.

Since the crown corporation announced its “5-Point Action Plan” a few days before the Christmas holidays in December 2013 — an attempt to downplay its significant message — Canada Post has ignored, stonewalled and dismissed public criticisms about the decision to end door-to-door delivery to about 5-million Canadian households, including in Hamilton.

Hamilton city officials revealed this week that local taxpayers could pay up to $2 million for costs related to installing and maintaining new community mailboxes scheduled to be erected across the Mountain and parts of upper Stoney Creek this spring.

Canada Post will pay the direct costs to install and maintain the boxes, but has only offered to pay $50 per mail box to help offset the costs borne by the city.

But as much as the offer is a slap in the face to residents, of much more significance is how dictatorial Canada Post has become in steamrolling its plans onto the backs of municipalities. Those attempting to fight Canada Post’s plans have ended up on the losing side of the legal argument. Hamilton’s legal options against Canada Post seem futile against a government entity that is hell-bent on reining in “costs.”

Canada Post officials have been quick to respond to the city’s report on community mailboxes, arguing it has done its due diligence when it comes to meeting with politicians and hearing from residents’ concerns. But when Mountain councillors met with Canada Post officials last summer they came away from the get together more frustrated than ever. They characterized the meeting as more perfunctory than anything else on Canada Post’s part since the organization was bulldozing ahead with its plan regardless of what the community desires. The agency continues to use the flawed reasoning for the radical changes that “the world is changing” and places some of the blame for the end of door-to-door delivery on Canadians themselves.

The maniacal focus by Canada Post to cut costs — at the cost of up to 8,000 jobs — with its “action plan” so it can “avoid becoming a drain on taxpayers,” is simply hogwash. Over the last 17 years Canada Post has added to the public purse in every year except 2011. In 2014, the Conference Board of Canada predicted Canada Post would lose $274 million. Instead, it made $13 million.

How’s that for a drain on taxpayers?

 

[poll id="198"]