COMMUNITY COLUMNNIST: What it takes to thrive in the 21st century

Opinion Jan 07, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

An important international study done by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) published in 2013 provides a compelling case for what our community needs to do to keep Hamilton prosperous and ensure residents have the skills they need to thrive in the 21st century.

The Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies is a worldwide study conducted by OECD. The study surveyed 157,000 adults for cognitive and workplace skills in 24 participating countries.

According to the study, there are three key competencies necessary for fully integrating and participating in the labour market, education and civic life: literacy, numeracy and problem solving in a technology rich environment.

As a public library, like many others in our community, we are committed to lifelong learning and helping Hamiltonians learn and grow. In fact, the question “What skills do people need to thrive in the modern world?” has preoccupied your public library since we were founded 125 years ago.

The question hasn’t changed, but the answer has evolved. The rapid evolution of technology over the last 25 years has opened a new world of information and connections, but only to those who have access to the equipment, bandwidth and knowledge to benefit from it.

Despite the lowering costs of technology and expanding access, barriers still exist.

In recent years we have focused on helping to bridge the digital divide to people who do not have regular access to high-speed Internet, lack access to current computer equipment or have skill gaps that threaten to exclude them from our increasingly interconnected world.

Reading and writing are still a major part of what we do.

We remain focused on early literacy and developing a love of reading at an early age because it is proven to have a hugely positive impact on both individuals and our community.

We will continue to build on these traditional services with an eye on new challenges people face.

Numeracy, financial literacy and problem solving in a technology rich environment will be an integral part of work in the coming years.

We look forward to continuing our work with partners who are dedicated to a bright future for Hamiltonians and ensuring our community has the skills, not just to survive, but to thrive in a rapidly changing world.

Paul Takala is the Chief Librarian at the Hamilton Public Library.                                               

If you would like to write in this space, call editor Gord Bowes at 905-664-8800 ext. 335.

COMMUNITY COLUMNNIST: What it takes to thrive in the 21st century

Opinion Jan 07, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

An important international study done by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) published in 2013 provides a compelling case for what our community needs to do to keep Hamilton prosperous and ensure residents have the skills they need to thrive in the 21st century.

The Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies is a worldwide study conducted by OECD. The study surveyed 157,000 adults for cognitive and workplace skills in 24 participating countries.

According to the study, there are three key competencies necessary for fully integrating and participating in the labour market, education and civic life: literacy, numeracy and problem solving in a technology rich environment.

As a public library, like many others in our community, we are committed to lifelong learning and helping Hamiltonians learn and grow. In fact, the question “What skills do people need to thrive in the modern world?” has preoccupied your public library since we were founded 125 years ago.

The question hasn’t changed, but the answer has evolved. The rapid evolution of technology over the last 25 years has opened a new world of information and connections, but only to those who have access to the equipment, bandwidth and knowledge to benefit from it.

Despite the lowering costs of technology and expanding access, barriers still exist.

In recent years we have focused on helping to bridge the digital divide to people who do not have regular access to high-speed Internet, lack access to current computer equipment or have skill gaps that threaten to exclude them from our increasingly interconnected world.

Reading and writing are still a major part of what we do.

We remain focused on early literacy and developing a love of reading at an early age because it is proven to have a hugely positive impact on both individuals and our community.

We will continue to build on these traditional services with an eye on new challenges people face.

Numeracy, financial literacy and problem solving in a technology rich environment will be an integral part of work in the coming years.

We look forward to continuing our work with partners who are dedicated to a bright future for Hamiltonians and ensuring our community has the skills, not just to survive, but to thrive in a rapidly changing world.

Paul Takala is the Chief Librarian at the Hamilton Public Library.                                               

If you would like to write in this space, call editor Gord Bowes at 905-664-8800 ext. 335.

COMMUNITY COLUMNNIST: What it takes to thrive in the 21st century

Opinion Jan 07, 2015 Hamilton Mountain News

An important international study done by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) published in 2013 provides a compelling case for what our community needs to do to keep Hamilton prosperous and ensure residents have the skills they need to thrive in the 21st century.

The Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies is a worldwide study conducted by OECD. The study surveyed 157,000 adults for cognitive and workplace skills in 24 participating countries.

According to the study, there are three key competencies necessary for fully integrating and participating in the labour market, education and civic life: literacy, numeracy and problem solving in a technology rich environment.

As a public library, like many others in our community, we are committed to lifelong learning and helping Hamiltonians learn and grow. In fact, the question “What skills do people need to thrive in the modern world?” has preoccupied your public library since we were founded 125 years ago.

The question hasn’t changed, but the answer has evolved. The rapid evolution of technology over the last 25 years has opened a new world of information and connections, but only to those who have access to the equipment, bandwidth and knowledge to benefit from it.

Despite the lowering costs of technology and expanding access, barriers still exist.

In recent years we have focused on helping to bridge the digital divide to people who do not have regular access to high-speed Internet, lack access to current computer equipment or have skill gaps that threaten to exclude them from our increasingly interconnected world.

Reading and writing are still a major part of what we do.

We remain focused on early literacy and developing a love of reading at an early age because it is proven to have a hugely positive impact on both individuals and our community.

We will continue to build on these traditional services with an eye on new challenges people face.

Numeracy, financial literacy and problem solving in a technology rich environment will be an integral part of work in the coming years.

We look forward to continuing our work with partners who are dedicated to a bright future for Hamiltonians and ensuring our community has the skills, not just to survive, but to thrive in a rapidly changing world.

Paul Takala is the Chief Librarian at the Hamilton Public Library.                                               

If you would like to write in this space, call editor Gord Bowes at 905-664-8800 ext. 335.