GROWING GREEN: Time for reflection

Opinion Dec 03, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Fall is drawing to a close and with it the end of another gardening season.

Now is a good time, while the memory’s still fresh, to think about all the things you liked about your garden this year and about some things you may wish to change or improve upon. Hopefully, you’ve taken some photos over the year and this will help you plan any changes.

I have to write things down or I tend to forget. Drawing up a general diagram of your beds and what’s planted where is a great idea also. It sounds so obvious, but each spring I see things coming up and can’t think for the life of me, what I planted there. But next year will be different since I’m making a real effort to document what I have and where.

Have you found that a shrub which, when you bought it, promised to be small, but then grew by leaps and bounds and is really not suited to that spot anymore? Or does this just happen to me?

No matter, I will relocate it next spring. And listen to comments from friends. Sometimes others may see or suggest an improvement you may have never considered.

This past spring, I relocated my bird feeders and am pleased with the results. After replacing the soil, I now have a small perennial bed there with purple coneflowers and shasta daisies. The birds are still easily visible from my seating area and best of all, any fallen seeds and shells are not near any plantings.

Soon enough, snow will cover and protect our gardens and I’ll sit back in my recliner and thumb through a few garden books and dream about next year’s projects.

Because, my garden will never be finished. It’s always evolving and changing. Always something new to try and there’s always room for another plant.

Growing Green is a regular feature written by the Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society (gardenontario.org/site.php/mhhs). Dini Balych, the author of this report, is on the society’s membership committee.

GROWING GREEN: Time for reflection

Opinion Dec 03, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Fall is drawing to a close and with it the end of another gardening season.

Now is a good time, while the memory’s still fresh, to think about all the things you liked about your garden this year and about some things you may wish to change or improve upon. Hopefully, you’ve taken some photos over the year and this will help you plan any changes.

I have to write things down or I tend to forget. Drawing up a general diagram of your beds and what’s planted where is a great idea also. It sounds so obvious, but each spring I see things coming up and can’t think for the life of me, what I planted there. But next year will be different since I’m making a real effort to document what I have and where.

Have you found that a shrub which, when you bought it, promised to be small, but then grew by leaps and bounds and is really not suited to that spot anymore? Or does this just happen to me?

No matter, I will relocate it next spring. And listen to comments from friends. Sometimes others may see or suggest an improvement you may have never considered.

This past spring, I relocated my bird feeders and am pleased with the results. After replacing the soil, I now have a small perennial bed there with purple coneflowers and shasta daisies. The birds are still easily visible from my seating area and best of all, any fallen seeds and shells are not near any plantings.

Soon enough, snow will cover and protect our gardens and I’ll sit back in my recliner and thumb through a few garden books and dream about next year’s projects.

Because, my garden will never be finished. It’s always evolving and changing. Always something new to try and there’s always room for another plant.

Growing Green is a regular feature written by the Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society (gardenontario.org/site.php/mhhs). Dini Balych, the author of this report, is on the society’s membership committee.

GROWING GREEN: Time for reflection

Opinion Dec 03, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Fall is drawing to a close and with it the end of another gardening season.

Now is a good time, while the memory’s still fresh, to think about all the things you liked about your garden this year and about some things you may wish to change or improve upon. Hopefully, you’ve taken some photos over the year and this will help you plan any changes.

I have to write things down or I tend to forget. Drawing up a general diagram of your beds and what’s planted where is a great idea also. It sounds so obvious, but each spring I see things coming up and can’t think for the life of me, what I planted there. But next year will be different since I’m making a real effort to document what I have and where.

Have you found that a shrub which, when you bought it, promised to be small, but then grew by leaps and bounds and is really not suited to that spot anymore? Or does this just happen to me?

No matter, I will relocate it next spring. And listen to comments from friends. Sometimes others may see or suggest an improvement you may have never considered.

This past spring, I relocated my bird feeders and am pleased with the results. After replacing the soil, I now have a small perennial bed there with purple coneflowers and shasta daisies. The birds are still easily visible from my seating area and best of all, any fallen seeds and shells are not near any plantings.

Soon enough, snow will cover and protect our gardens and I’ll sit back in my recliner and thumb through a few garden books and dream about next year’s projects.

Because, my garden will never be finished. It’s always evolving and changing. Always something new to try and there’s always room for another plant.

Growing Green is a regular feature written by the Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society (gardenontario.org/site.php/mhhs). Dini Balych, the author of this report, is on the society’s membership committee.