GROWING GREEN: Get bulbs in the ground now for beautiful flowers in the spring

Opinion Oct 22, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Plant your spring bulbs today.

Early planting allows bulbs ample time to develop strong roots before the ground freezes.

When choosing bulbs, look beyond the tulips and daffodils planted by everyone on the block and try some of these.

Most are low-growing and disappear after blooming.

Early spring

Anemone Blanda: Little star-like flowers in mauve, white and blue. They combine well with white rock cress. Sun.

Chionodoxa: Blue, white, mauve. Sun/part shade. Naturalizes.

Eranthis: Small yellow flowers to balance all the blue and white of other bulbs. Sun/light shade.

Erythronium: (Dog’s Tooth Violet) 25 centimetres tall, yellow, white, purple. Speckled foliage. Native plant. Sun/light shade.

Galanthus: (Snowdrops) little white bells, sun/light shade.

Mid-spring

Fritillaria: two varieties — tiny, checkered mauve bells, or one metre tall flowers in hot colours. Part shade.

Leucojum: Look like taller snowdrops. Sun/part shade.

Muscari: (grape hyacinth) lovely blue/purple colour. Naturalizes.

Scilla: Blue, sun/part shade. Naturalizes. Looks lovely with red or white tulips.

Uvularia: (Merrybells): Native to North America, yellow bell-like flowers. Part shade.

Some of the above are bulbs, others are corms, tubers or rhizomes. Follow the directions on the package for correct planting depth. Most will grow in any soil, as long as it doesn’t get too soggy in winter. Add compost — not manure — if soil is too heavy. The use of bone meal is debatable, so I skip it.

To fool the squirrels, pat the soil down well so it doesn’t look disturbed, and cover the top with leaves. Then sit back and wait ‘til spring.

Growing Green is a regular feature written by the Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society (gardenontario.org/site.php/mhhs). Rita Bailey, the author of this report, is a member who gardens in downtown Hamilton, where she mixes vegetables, herbs, and flowers in her kitchen garden.

GROWING GREEN: Get bulbs in the ground now for beautiful flowers in the spring

Opinion Oct 22, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Plant your spring bulbs today.

Early planting allows bulbs ample time to develop strong roots before the ground freezes.

When choosing bulbs, look beyond the tulips and daffodils planted by everyone on the block and try some of these.

Most are low-growing and disappear after blooming.

Early spring

Anemone Blanda: Little star-like flowers in mauve, white and blue. They combine well with white rock cress. Sun.

Chionodoxa: Blue, white, mauve. Sun/part shade. Naturalizes.

Eranthis: Small yellow flowers to balance all the blue and white of other bulbs. Sun/light shade.

Erythronium: (Dog’s Tooth Violet) 25 centimetres tall, yellow, white, purple. Speckled foliage. Native plant. Sun/light shade.

Galanthus: (Snowdrops) little white bells, sun/light shade.

Mid-spring

Fritillaria: two varieties — tiny, checkered mauve bells, or one metre tall flowers in hot colours. Part shade.

Leucojum: Look like taller snowdrops. Sun/part shade.

Muscari: (grape hyacinth) lovely blue/purple colour. Naturalizes.

Scilla: Blue, sun/part shade. Naturalizes. Looks lovely with red or white tulips.

Uvularia: (Merrybells): Native to North America, yellow bell-like flowers. Part shade.

Some of the above are bulbs, others are corms, tubers or rhizomes. Follow the directions on the package for correct planting depth. Most will grow in any soil, as long as it doesn’t get too soggy in winter. Add compost — not manure — if soil is too heavy. The use of bone meal is debatable, so I skip it.

To fool the squirrels, pat the soil down well so it doesn’t look disturbed, and cover the top with leaves. Then sit back and wait ‘til spring.

Growing Green is a regular feature written by the Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society (gardenontario.org/site.php/mhhs). Rita Bailey, the author of this report, is a member who gardens in downtown Hamilton, where she mixes vegetables, herbs, and flowers in her kitchen garden.

GROWING GREEN: Get bulbs in the ground now for beautiful flowers in the spring

Opinion Oct 22, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Plant your spring bulbs today.

Early planting allows bulbs ample time to develop strong roots before the ground freezes.

When choosing bulbs, look beyond the tulips and daffodils planted by everyone on the block and try some of these.

Most are low-growing and disappear after blooming.

Early spring

Anemone Blanda: Little star-like flowers in mauve, white and blue. They combine well with white rock cress. Sun.

Chionodoxa: Blue, white, mauve. Sun/part shade. Naturalizes.

Eranthis: Small yellow flowers to balance all the blue and white of other bulbs. Sun/light shade.

Erythronium: (Dog’s Tooth Violet) 25 centimetres tall, yellow, white, purple. Speckled foliage. Native plant. Sun/light shade.

Galanthus: (Snowdrops) little white bells, sun/light shade.

Mid-spring

Fritillaria: two varieties — tiny, checkered mauve bells, or one metre tall flowers in hot colours. Part shade.

Leucojum: Look like taller snowdrops. Sun/part shade.

Muscari: (grape hyacinth) lovely blue/purple colour. Naturalizes.

Scilla: Blue, sun/part shade. Naturalizes. Looks lovely with red or white tulips.

Uvularia: (Merrybells): Native to North America, yellow bell-like flowers. Part shade.

Some of the above are bulbs, others are corms, tubers or rhizomes. Follow the directions on the package for correct planting depth. Most will grow in any soil, as long as it doesn’t get too soggy in winter. Add compost — not manure — if soil is too heavy. The use of bone meal is debatable, so I skip it.

To fool the squirrels, pat the soil down well so it doesn’t look disturbed, and cover the top with leaves. Then sit back and wait ‘til spring.

Growing Green is a regular feature written by the Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society (gardenontario.org/site.php/mhhs). Rita Bailey, the author of this report, is a member who gardens in downtown Hamilton, where she mixes vegetables, herbs, and flowers in her kitchen garden.