LETTER: We need a day to remember Margaret

Opinion Sep 24, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

re: Why wasn’t young Margaret remembered on Sept. 10? (Letters, Sept. 18)

Regarding Chick Evans’ question about Margaret Hayworth, the first child victim of the Second World War, I have often wondered the same.

Margaret was 10 and I was 11 when we met aboard the SS Athenia sailing from Montreal to Glasgow Scotland in 1939.

We became good friends during the nine-day voyage. I remember her as a very nice quiet girl who seldom let go of her little sisters hand.

We parted when the ship docked at Glasgow. I to my future home in Edinburgh and Margaret to enjoy a vacation with family.

At the fear of war, many holiday makers hastened to return to Canada. Margaret and her family were among them.

We had a visit from the ship’s waiter who served our table.

He told us so many stories of what happened when the ship was torpedoed.

He said Margaret hurt her head as she was being put into a lifeboat and she did not recover.

Surely that little girl should be remembered when Sept. 3 comes around.

A day, or a plaque — something that will remind us of a little girl who went to Glasgow on vacation, but didn’t come home because of a German U-boat commander’s order to kill.

Bette Wallace

Hamilton Mountain

LETTER: We need a day to remember Margaret

Opinion Sep 24, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

re: Why wasn’t young Margaret remembered on Sept. 10? (Letters, Sept. 18)

Regarding Chick Evans’ question about Margaret Hayworth, the first child victim of the Second World War, I have often wondered the same.

Margaret was 10 and I was 11 when we met aboard the SS Athenia sailing from Montreal to Glasgow Scotland in 1939.

We became good friends during the nine-day voyage. I remember her as a very nice quiet girl who seldom let go of her little sisters hand.

We parted when the ship docked at Glasgow. I to my future home in Edinburgh and Margaret to enjoy a vacation with family.

At the fear of war, many holiday makers hastened to return to Canada. Margaret and her family were among them.

We had a visit from the ship’s waiter who served our table.

He told us so many stories of what happened when the ship was torpedoed.

He said Margaret hurt her head as she was being put into a lifeboat and she did not recover.

Surely that little girl should be remembered when Sept. 3 comes around.

A day, or a plaque — something that will remind us of a little girl who went to Glasgow on vacation, but didn’t come home because of a German U-boat commander’s order to kill.

Bette Wallace

Hamilton Mountain

LETTER: We need a day to remember Margaret

Opinion Sep 24, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

re: Why wasn’t young Margaret remembered on Sept. 10? (Letters, Sept. 18)

Regarding Chick Evans’ question about Margaret Hayworth, the first child victim of the Second World War, I have often wondered the same.

Margaret was 10 and I was 11 when we met aboard the SS Athenia sailing from Montreal to Glasgow Scotland in 1939.

We became good friends during the nine-day voyage. I remember her as a very nice quiet girl who seldom let go of her little sisters hand.

We parted when the ship docked at Glasgow. I to my future home in Edinburgh and Margaret to enjoy a vacation with family.

At the fear of war, many holiday makers hastened to return to Canada. Margaret and her family were among them.

We had a visit from the ship’s waiter who served our table.

He told us so many stories of what happened when the ship was torpedoed.

He said Margaret hurt her head as she was being put into a lifeboat and she did not recover.

Surely that little girl should be remembered when Sept. 3 comes around.

A day, or a plaque — something that will remind us of a little girl who went to Glasgow on vacation, but didn’t come home because of a German U-boat commander’s order to kill.

Bette Wallace

Hamilton Mountain