GROWING GREEN: Let your imagination fly while decorating in the garden

Opinion Sep 03, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Seems like we gardeners are concerned with chores in the spring and then it’s planting time. By summer, we’re often inundated with those not-so-glorious weeds despite the mulching and constant vigilance.

However, maybe there’s time now to perk up some dull spots with a decorative flair.

I rarely discard broken containers or pots, but strive to repurpose them. Lay a broken clay pot on its side and plant with low-growing sedum which appears to flow from the pot.

A large olive oil can or old watering can might contain colourful annuals. The body of my old barbecue sits on the hill in my backyard in the midst of goose-necked loosestrife and this year is planted with asters and salvia.

A great project to create lasting memories with children or grandchildren is to simply paint or stencil some tired-looking planters. Pleasing effects can also be achieved by making stepping stones and embedding broken bits of china (grandma’s?) or sea shells (from a family beach holiday) just before the cement sets.

An old birdbath or other shallow container planted with sempervivum and other succulents and a few colourful stones can look stunning.

A friend of mine has wave petunias growing out of a retro toaster on one corner of her deck.

An old wooden ladder or piece of lattice could be placed strategically and support several climbing vines such as scarlet runner beans and morning glory to provide eye-catching colour all summer.

There’s really no end to the uses you can put to everyday items.

Can’t find anything? Try looking in a second-hand, resale shop or garage sale and let your imagination fly.

Growing Green is a regular feature written by the Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society (gardenontario.org/site.php/mhhs). Dini Balych, the author of this report, is on the society’s membership committee.

GROWING GREEN: Let your imagination fly while decorating in the garden

Opinion Sep 03, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Seems like we gardeners are concerned with chores in the spring and then it’s planting time. By summer, we’re often inundated with those not-so-glorious weeds despite the mulching and constant vigilance.

However, maybe there’s time now to perk up some dull spots with a decorative flair.

I rarely discard broken containers or pots, but strive to repurpose them. Lay a broken clay pot on its side and plant with low-growing sedum which appears to flow from the pot.

A large olive oil can or old watering can might contain colourful annuals. The body of my old barbecue sits on the hill in my backyard in the midst of goose-necked loosestrife and this year is planted with asters and salvia.

A great project to create lasting memories with children or grandchildren is to simply paint or stencil some tired-looking planters. Pleasing effects can also be achieved by making stepping stones and embedding broken bits of china (grandma’s?) or sea shells (from a family beach holiday) just before the cement sets.

An old birdbath or other shallow container planted with sempervivum and other succulents and a few colourful stones can look stunning.

A friend of mine has wave petunias growing out of a retro toaster on one corner of her deck.

An old wooden ladder or piece of lattice could be placed strategically and support several climbing vines such as scarlet runner beans and morning glory to provide eye-catching colour all summer.

There’s really no end to the uses you can put to everyday items.

Can’t find anything? Try looking in a second-hand, resale shop or garage sale and let your imagination fly.

Growing Green is a regular feature written by the Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society (gardenontario.org/site.php/mhhs). Dini Balych, the author of this report, is on the society’s membership committee.

GROWING GREEN: Let your imagination fly while decorating in the garden

Opinion Sep 03, 2014 Hamilton Mountain News

Seems like we gardeners are concerned with chores in the spring and then it’s planting time. By summer, we’re often inundated with those not-so-glorious weeds despite the mulching and constant vigilance.

However, maybe there’s time now to perk up some dull spots with a decorative flair.

I rarely discard broken containers or pots, but strive to repurpose them. Lay a broken clay pot on its side and plant with low-growing sedum which appears to flow from the pot.

A large olive oil can or old watering can might contain colourful annuals. The body of my old barbecue sits on the hill in my backyard in the midst of goose-necked loosestrife and this year is planted with asters and salvia.

A great project to create lasting memories with children or grandchildren is to simply paint or stencil some tired-looking planters. Pleasing effects can also be achieved by making stepping stones and embedding broken bits of china (grandma’s?) or sea shells (from a family beach holiday) just before the cement sets.

An old birdbath or other shallow container planted with sempervivum and other succulents and a few colourful stones can look stunning.

A friend of mine has wave petunias growing out of a retro toaster on one corner of her deck.

An old wooden ladder or piece of lattice could be placed strategically and support several climbing vines such as scarlet runner beans and morning glory to provide eye-catching colour all summer.

There’s really no end to the uses you can put to everyday items.

Can’t find anything? Try looking in a second-hand, resale shop or garage sale and let your imagination fly.

Growing Green is a regular feature written by the Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society (gardenontario.org/site.php/mhhs). Dini Balych, the author of this report, is on the society’s membership committee.