Stoney Creek shops cautiously reopen

News May 25, 2020 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Sharon Richards isn’t taking any chances with the coronavirus as she once again welcomes customers into her downtown Stoney Creek gift shop.

A table inside the door at McGee’s Landing offers hand sanitizer, disposable medical gloves and disinfectant wipes, while floor arrows suggest how to navigate the King Street East store.

Richards herself wears a mask abound her neck, ready for use, and she cautions a reporter to keep a two-metre distance as she offers a cheerful greeting from her seat by the cash register.

Her stock of mostly Canadian-made gifts, jewelry and boutique ladies’ wear is now supplemented by a variety of face masks and a baseball cap with a small Canadian flag and arrows indicating a two-metre separation.

“If you can read this you are too close,” the cap proclaims.

The shop is only open from noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday for now, but Richards says she’ll accommodate customers outside those hours, including for delivery.

“Anything we can do to help people,” says Richards, who credits a “very generous” landlord for helping her five-year-old business weather a government-ordered shutdown that ended May 19.

“If, say, they want to come in at 6 o’clock at night with their daughter or mother, then we make that time available for them so they have it to themselves.”

A sign in the window of the Charmed and Chalked store a short walk away sets four rules for entry: no COVID-19 symptoms, hand sanitizer, social distancing, and use a mask, if you have one.

Inside, owner Barb Giancaterina has installed a Plexiglas shield by the cash register and offers hand sanitizers, gloves and masks.

Her shop, which specializes in refinishing furniture and interior decorating, is allowing a maximum of five people at a time, including employees, with floor arrows directing customers.

“I want people to feel comfortable and safe in the store, because if they don’t, they’re not coming back,” says Giancaterina, who opened at her current location in November after a year at another spot.

She’s also reduced store hours — to 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday, and 1 to 6 p.m. Friday — but will arrange for curbside pickup and delivery at other times.

While regular in-store workshops are gone for now, Giancaterina says the temporary shutdown had one silver lining.

“We’re doing sales online now, which is something we were not doing before,” she says.

Facing a tougher challenge further down King Street is the Village Restaurant, where owner-manager Mary Terziev-Clifford is now offering takeout breakfast and lunch from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday to Sunday.

She says if takeout goes well, her 44-year-old family-run eatery will add hours and days, but it’s a pricey experiment because of the need to buy containers and prepackaged utensils, maple syrup, spices and condiments.

“It’s been really hard,” Terziev-Clifford says of the pandemic’s impact on the Village and related neighbouring businesses, The Penalty Box sports bar and Karlee’s off-track betting.

“Fifty staff are without jobs, and really, it’s only going to be a cook, family and a manager working (for takeout). That’s it.”

Terziev-Clifford says she’s cut utility costs as much as possible and taken advantage of an interest-free $40,000 emergency federal loan to small businesses, but the money went quickly.

Still, she remains stoic as she awaits the province’s permission to reopen doors to seated customers.

“No one’s going to drop us over this,” she says. “We’re going to get right back up there.”

Herman Demirci, owner of Stoney Creek Tailors, is less sanguine, calling the shutdown “a total farce” — although he does offer hand sanitizer for customers wanting it.

He says it's nearly impossible to measure someone for a suit without getting close to them and the pandemic restrictions have already largely cost him the wedding season.

Demirci estimates his 52-year-old shop’s business will be down 60 to 70 per cent this year.

“It’s killed economies,” he says, preferring Sweden’s approach of letting businesses stay open and allowing “chips fall where they will.”

“Here, we’ve devastated our whole economy, same with the States. I don’t think it was worth it.”


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: With the COVID-19 pandemic continuing, we wanted to know how businesses that are reopening are adapting their practices to keep customers and staff safe.

Stoney Creek shops cautiously reopen amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic

Reduced hours, new safety rules greet customers #futureofwork

News May 25, 2020 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Sharon Richards isn’t taking any chances with the coronavirus as she once again welcomes customers into her downtown Stoney Creek gift shop.

A table inside the door at McGee’s Landing offers hand sanitizer, disposable medical gloves and disinfectant wipes, while floor arrows suggest how to navigate the King Street East store.

Richards herself wears a mask abound her neck, ready for use, and she cautions a reporter to keep a two-metre distance as she offers a cheerful greeting from her seat by the cash register.

Her stock of mostly Canadian-made gifts, jewelry and boutique ladies’ wear is now supplemented by a variety of face masks and a baseball cap with a small Canadian flag and arrows indicating a two-metre separation.

Related Content

“If you can read this you are too close,” the cap proclaims.

The shop is only open from noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday for now, but Richards says she’ll accommodate customers outside those hours, including for delivery.

“Anything we can do to help people,” says Richards, who credits a “very generous” landlord for helping her five-year-old business weather a government-ordered shutdown that ended May 19.

“If, say, they want to come in at 6 o’clock at night with their daughter or mother, then we make that time available for them so they have it to themselves.”

A sign in the window of the Charmed and Chalked store a short walk away sets four rules for entry: no COVID-19 symptoms, hand sanitizer, social distancing, and use a mask, if you have one.

Inside, owner Barb Giancaterina has installed a Plexiglas shield by the cash register and offers hand sanitizers, gloves and masks.

Her shop, which specializes in refinishing furniture and interior decorating, is allowing a maximum of five people at a time, including employees, with floor arrows directing customers.

“I want people to feel comfortable and safe in the store, because if they don’t, they’re not coming back,” says Giancaterina, who opened at her current location in November after a year at another spot.

She’s also reduced store hours — to 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday, and 1 to 6 p.m. Friday — but will arrange for curbside pickup and delivery at other times.

While regular in-store workshops are gone for now, Giancaterina says the temporary shutdown had one silver lining.

“We’re doing sales online now, which is something we were not doing before,” she says.

Facing a tougher challenge further down King Street is the Village Restaurant, where owner-manager Mary Terziev-Clifford is now offering takeout breakfast and lunch from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday to Sunday.

She says if takeout goes well, her 44-year-old family-run eatery will add hours and days, but it’s a pricey experiment because of the need to buy containers and prepackaged utensils, maple syrup, spices and condiments.

“It’s been really hard,” Terziev-Clifford says of the pandemic’s impact on the Village and related neighbouring businesses, The Penalty Box sports bar and Karlee’s off-track betting.

“Fifty staff are without jobs, and really, it’s only going to be a cook, family and a manager working (for takeout). That’s it.”

Terziev-Clifford says she’s cut utility costs as much as possible and taken advantage of an interest-free $40,000 emergency federal loan to small businesses, but the money went quickly.

Still, she remains stoic as she awaits the province’s permission to reopen doors to seated customers.

“No one’s going to drop us over this,” she says. “We’re going to get right back up there.”

Herman Demirci, owner of Stoney Creek Tailors, is less sanguine, calling the shutdown “a total farce” — although he does offer hand sanitizer for customers wanting it.

He says it's nearly impossible to measure someone for a suit without getting close to them and the pandemic restrictions have already largely cost him the wedding season.

Demirci estimates his 52-year-old shop’s business will be down 60 to 70 per cent this year.

“It’s killed economies,” he says, preferring Sweden’s approach of letting businesses stay open and allowing “chips fall where they will.”

“Here, we’ve devastated our whole economy, same with the States. I don’t think it was worth it.”


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: With the COVID-19 pandemic continuing, we wanted to know how businesses that are reopening are adapting their practices to keep customers and staff safe.

Stoney Creek shops cautiously reopen amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic

Reduced hours, new safety rules greet customers #futureofwork

News May 25, 2020 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Sharon Richards isn’t taking any chances with the coronavirus as she once again welcomes customers into her downtown Stoney Creek gift shop.

A table inside the door at McGee’s Landing offers hand sanitizer, disposable medical gloves and disinfectant wipes, while floor arrows suggest how to navigate the King Street East store.

Richards herself wears a mask abound her neck, ready for use, and she cautions a reporter to keep a two-metre distance as she offers a cheerful greeting from her seat by the cash register.

Her stock of mostly Canadian-made gifts, jewelry and boutique ladies’ wear is now supplemented by a variety of face masks and a baseball cap with a small Canadian flag and arrows indicating a two-metre separation.

Related Content

“If you can read this you are too close,” the cap proclaims.

The shop is only open from noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday for now, but Richards says she’ll accommodate customers outside those hours, including for delivery.

“Anything we can do to help people,” says Richards, who credits a “very generous” landlord for helping her five-year-old business weather a government-ordered shutdown that ended May 19.

“If, say, they want to come in at 6 o’clock at night with their daughter or mother, then we make that time available for them so they have it to themselves.”

A sign in the window of the Charmed and Chalked store a short walk away sets four rules for entry: no COVID-19 symptoms, hand sanitizer, social distancing, and use a mask, if you have one.

Inside, owner Barb Giancaterina has installed a Plexiglas shield by the cash register and offers hand sanitizers, gloves and masks.

Her shop, which specializes in refinishing furniture and interior decorating, is allowing a maximum of five people at a time, including employees, with floor arrows directing customers.

“I want people to feel comfortable and safe in the store, because if they don’t, they’re not coming back,” says Giancaterina, who opened at her current location in November after a year at another spot.

She’s also reduced store hours — to 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday, and 1 to 6 p.m. Friday — but will arrange for curbside pickup and delivery at other times.

While regular in-store workshops are gone for now, Giancaterina says the temporary shutdown had one silver lining.

“We’re doing sales online now, which is something we were not doing before,” she says.

Facing a tougher challenge further down King Street is the Village Restaurant, where owner-manager Mary Terziev-Clifford is now offering takeout breakfast and lunch from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday to Sunday.

She says if takeout goes well, her 44-year-old family-run eatery will add hours and days, but it’s a pricey experiment because of the need to buy containers and prepackaged utensils, maple syrup, spices and condiments.

“It’s been really hard,” Terziev-Clifford says of the pandemic’s impact on the Village and related neighbouring businesses, The Penalty Box sports bar and Karlee’s off-track betting.

“Fifty staff are without jobs, and really, it’s only going to be a cook, family and a manager working (for takeout). That’s it.”

Terziev-Clifford says she’s cut utility costs as much as possible and taken advantage of an interest-free $40,000 emergency federal loan to small businesses, but the money went quickly.

Still, she remains stoic as she awaits the province’s permission to reopen doors to seated customers.

“No one’s going to drop us over this,” she says. “We’re going to get right back up there.”

Herman Demirci, owner of Stoney Creek Tailors, is less sanguine, calling the shutdown “a total farce” — although he does offer hand sanitizer for customers wanting it.

He says it's nearly impossible to measure someone for a suit without getting close to them and the pandemic restrictions have already largely cost him the wedding season.

Demirci estimates his 52-year-old shop’s business will be down 60 to 70 per cent this year.

“It’s killed economies,” he says, preferring Sweden’s approach of letting businesses stay open and allowing “chips fall where they will.”

“Here, we’ve devastated our whole economy, same with the States. I don’t think it was worth it.”


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: With the COVID-19 pandemic continuing, we wanted to know how businesses that are reopening are adapting their practices to keep customers and staff safe.