When will gyms and fitness facilities be allowed to reopen?

News May 22, 2020 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

While many businesses are managing the challenges of the novel coronavirus and slowly reopening their doors, Rodney Foster predicts gyms and fitness studios could be among the last to resume face-to-face business activities.

Foster, founder and co-owner of Stoney Creek’s Aftershok Performance Fitness, has been conducting training sessions through the Zoom online video conferencing platform since late March, with added support from a private Facebook group. The conferencing system allows Foster and his staff to communicate with clients and keep them motivated while they train.

About $45,000 worth of weights and bikes have been loaned to members, so they can train at home with virtual support from Aftershok staff.

“It’s been eight weeks with no one at our facility. And we’re still providing (clients) with the results we said they would get,” Foster said on May 20. “Realistically, the world as we know it has changed. So, we have to adapt, and we have to embrace that change and go with it.”

Many participants have embraced the Zoom technology and the flexibility it offers.

“A lot of people are doing more than what they would have done, because all they have to do now is go in the basement, turn the TV on, or their laptop, or whatever, and boom,” Foster added.

Still, since the pandemic began, Aftershok has watched 67 people – close to half of its members – cancel their memberships.

“And we understand,” said Foster. “They all said, ‘We’ll be back as soon as you open your doors.’ And we said, ‘The doors may not be open.’”

Gyms and fitness clubs were not included in the province’s phase 1 reopening plans.

While he doesn’t know what the future will hold, Foster is prepared to continue delivering virtual programs for the foreseeable future. Aftershok offers a functional full-body boot camp, spin classes, elite sports team training and other services.

Foster said his landlord has been very sympathetic to his situation, but with a lease up for renewal at the end of June, it’s unclear if the fitness studio will reopen in its current location.

Foster estimates close to half of Ontario’s conventional box gyms could be forced to close their doors for good. Those that remain open may be forced to increase fees and ask customers to book workout times in advance to ensure physical distancing.

With most of Aftershok’s in-person programming ranging from five to 15 people, Foster is holding out hope that regular class sessions could be allowed later this summer or fall. But he understands the concerns over the potential spread of viruses and bacteria in a workout setting and noted he’s prepared to continue providing programs in a virtual environment for as long as possible.

When will gyms and fitness facilities be allowed to reopen?

News May 22, 2020 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

While many businesses are managing the challenges of the novel coronavirus and slowly reopening their doors, Rodney Foster predicts gyms and fitness studios could be among the last to resume face-to-face business activities.

Foster, founder and co-owner of Stoney Creek’s Aftershok Performance Fitness, has been conducting training sessions through the Zoom online video conferencing platform since late March, with added support from a private Facebook group. The conferencing system allows Foster and his staff to communicate with clients and keep them motivated while they train.

About $45,000 worth of weights and bikes have been loaned to members, so they can train at home with virtual support from Aftershok staff.

“It’s been eight weeks with no one at our facility. And we’re still providing (clients) with the results we said they would get,” Foster said on May 20. “Realistically, the world as we know it has changed. So, we have to adapt, and we have to embrace that change and go with it.”

Related Content

Many participants have embraced the Zoom technology and the flexibility it offers.

“A lot of people are doing more than what they would have done, because all they have to do now is go in the basement, turn the TV on, or their laptop, or whatever, and boom,” Foster added.

Still, since the pandemic began, Aftershok has watched 67 people – close to half of its members – cancel their memberships.

“And we understand,” said Foster. “They all said, ‘We’ll be back as soon as you open your doors.’ And we said, ‘The doors may not be open.’”

Gyms and fitness clubs were not included in the province’s phase 1 reopening plans.

While he doesn’t know what the future will hold, Foster is prepared to continue delivering virtual programs for the foreseeable future. Aftershok offers a functional full-body boot camp, spin classes, elite sports team training and other services.

Foster said his landlord has been very sympathetic to his situation, but with a lease up for renewal at the end of June, it’s unclear if the fitness studio will reopen in its current location.

Foster estimates close to half of Ontario’s conventional box gyms could be forced to close their doors for good. Those that remain open may be forced to increase fees and ask customers to book workout times in advance to ensure physical distancing.

With most of Aftershok’s in-person programming ranging from five to 15 people, Foster is holding out hope that regular class sessions could be allowed later this summer or fall. But he understands the concerns over the potential spread of viruses and bacteria in a workout setting and noted he’s prepared to continue providing programs in a virtual environment for as long as possible.

When will gyms and fitness facilities be allowed to reopen?

News May 22, 2020 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

While many businesses are managing the challenges of the novel coronavirus and slowly reopening their doors, Rodney Foster predicts gyms and fitness studios could be among the last to resume face-to-face business activities.

Foster, founder and co-owner of Stoney Creek’s Aftershok Performance Fitness, has been conducting training sessions through the Zoom online video conferencing platform since late March, with added support from a private Facebook group. The conferencing system allows Foster and his staff to communicate with clients and keep them motivated while they train.

About $45,000 worth of weights and bikes have been loaned to members, so they can train at home with virtual support from Aftershok staff.

“It’s been eight weeks with no one at our facility. And we’re still providing (clients) with the results we said they would get,” Foster said on May 20. “Realistically, the world as we know it has changed. So, we have to adapt, and we have to embrace that change and go with it.”

Related Content

Many participants have embraced the Zoom technology and the flexibility it offers.

“A lot of people are doing more than what they would have done, because all they have to do now is go in the basement, turn the TV on, or their laptop, or whatever, and boom,” Foster added.

Still, since the pandemic began, Aftershok has watched 67 people – close to half of its members – cancel their memberships.

“And we understand,” said Foster. “They all said, ‘We’ll be back as soon as you open your doors.’ And we said, ‘The doors may not be open.’”

Gyms and fitness clubs were not included in the province’s phase 1 reopening plans.

While he doesn’t know what the future will hold, Foster is prepared to continue delivering virtual programs for the foreseeable future. Aftershok offers a functional full-body boot camp, spin classes, elite sports team training and other services.

Foster said his landlord has been very sympathetic to his situation, but with a lease up for renewal at the end of June, it’s unclear if the fitness studio will reopen in its current location.

Foster estimates close to half of Ontario’s conventional box gyms could be forced to close their doors for good. Those that remain open may be forced to increase fees and ask customers to book workout times in advance to ensure physical distancing.

With most of Aftershok’s in-person programming ranging from five to 15 people, Foster is holding out hope that regular class sessions could be allowed later this summer or fall. But he understands the concerns over the potential spread of viruses and bacteria in a workout setting and noted he’s prepared to continue providing programs in a virtual environment for as long as possible.