Is your salon ready to reopen? Here's what customers should look for

News May 21, 2020 Toronto.com

As the Ontario government begins to reopen businesses, those who frequent salons and spas may be wondering when they will be finally able to get back to their favourite spot to get beautified.

According to the CBON Group, a supplier for professional infection control products across Canada, this will require a number of adjustments and sacrifices made on behalf of both the beauty company and its customers.

"This transformative change will come with a need for significant investment, retraining and repurposing of salons and spas for a new life in the age of coronavirus and future outbreaks," Jeff Alford, president of the CBON Group, added.

Alford said beauty professionals should be making the following changes prior to reopening:

Learning about risks and prevention

In order for beauty industry professionals to open up their salons and spas in a safe and confident manner, they should make sure they are well aware of the risks associated with COVID-19 in their particular role, as well as ways they can prevent any spread.

This may require further education and training for current management and employees, as well as hiring an infection prevention representative.

Having a physical distancing plan

Though many of the services at salons and spas will require close physical contact between the employee and the customer, other adjustments can be made to limit the number of people in close proximity to one another.

Depending on the type of service provided, these changes may include removing waiting rooms, distancing work stations, having Plexiglas shields in certain areas, having employees wear personal protective equipment and more.

Checking customers at the door

Similar to what a number of other businesses are currently doing, salons and spas may be required in the future to screen their customers at the door by taking their temperature or checking off a list of symptoms prior to permitting entry.

Ensuring proper sanitization 

Beauty industry professionals will have to educate themselves on the proper disinfectants and cleaning products to use for their particular line of work. 

Workstations and all shared surfaces, including furniture, counters and washrooms, will have to be properly cleaned and disinfected after every client.

Being transparent about changes

As salons and spas begin to take customers again, it will be important that they communicate changes to their customers in order to maintain a relationship centred on trust and safety. This includes clearly communicating about any additional charges customers may incur for the services as a result of the additional measures that have been put in place. 

Is your salon ready to reopen? Here's what customers should look for

Ontario's beauty industry will have to make many changes: expert

News May 21, 2020 Toronto.com

As the Ontario government begins to reopen businesses, those who frequent salons and spas may be wondering when they will be finally able to get back to their favourite spot to get beautified.

According to the CBON Group, a supplier for professional infection control products across Canada, this will require a number of adjustments and sacrifices made on behalf of both the beauty company and its customers.

"This transformative change will come with a need for significant investment, retraining and repurposing of salons and spas for a new life in the age of coronavirus and future outbreaks," Jeff Alford, president of the CBON Group, added.

Alford said beauty professionals should be making the following changes prior to reopening:

Learning about risks and prevention

In order for beauty industry professionals to open up their salons and spas in a safe and confident manner, they should make sure they are well aware of the risks associated with COVID-19 in their particular role, as well as ways they can prevent any spread.

This may require further education and training for current management and employees, as well as hiring an infection prevention representative.

Having a physical distancing plan

Though many of the services at salons and spas will require close physical contact between the employee and the customer, other adjustments can be made to limit the number of people in close proximity to one another.

Depending on the type of service provided, these changes may include removing waiting rooms, distancing work stations, having Plexiglas shields in certain areas, having employees wear personal protective equipment and more.

Checking customers at the door

Similar to what a number of other businesses are currently doing, salons and spas may be required in the future to screen their customers at the door by taking their temperature or checking off a list of symptoms prior to permitting entry.

Ensuring proper sanitization 

Beauty industry professionals will have to educate themselves on the proper disinfectants and cleaning products to use for their particular line of work. 

Workstations and all shared surfaces, including furniture, counters and washrooms, will have to be properly cleaned and disinfected after every client.

Being transparent about changes

As salons and spas begin to take customers again, it will be important that they communicate changes to their customers in order to maintain a relationship centred on trust and safety. This includes clearly communicating about any additional charges customers may incur for the services as a result of the additional measures that have been put in place. 

Is your salon ready to reopen? Here's what customers should look for

Ontario's beauty industry will have to make many changes: expert

News May 21, 2020 Toronto.com

As the Ontario government begins to reopen businesses, those who frequent salons and spas may be wondering when they will be finally able to get back to their favourite spot to get beautified.

According to the CBON Group, a supplier for professional infection control products across Canada, this will require a number of adjustments and sacrifices made on behalf of both the beauty company and its customers.

"This transformative change will come with a need for significant investment, retraining and repurposing of salons and spas for a new life in the age of coronavirus and future outbreaks," Jeff Alford, president of the CBON Group, added.

Alford said beauty professionals should be making the following changes prior to reopening:

Learning about risks and prevention

In order for beauty industry professionals to open up their salons and spas in a safe and confident manner, they should make sure they are well aware of the risks associated with COVID-19 in their particular role, as well as ways they can prevent any spread.

This may require further education and training for current management and employees, as well as hiring an infection prevention representative.

Having a physical distancing plan

Though many of the services at salons and spas will require close physical contact between the employee and the customer, other adjustments can be made to limit the number of people in close proximity to one another.

Depending on the type of service provided, these changes may include removing waiting rooms, distancing work stations, having Plexiglas shields in certain areas, having employees wear personal protective equipment and more.

Checking customers at the door

Similar to what a number of other businesses are currently doing, salons and spas may be required in the future to screen their customers at the door by taking their temperature or checking off a list of symptoms prior to permitting entry.

Ensuring proper sanitization 

Beauty industry professionals will have to educate themselves on the proper disinfectants and cleaning products to use for their particular line of work. 

Workstations and all shared surfaces, including furniture, counters and washrooms, will have to be properly cleaned and disinfected after every client.

Being transparent about changes

As salons and spas begin to take customers again, it will be important that they communicate changes to their customers in order to maintain a relationship centred on trust and safety. This includes clearly communicating about any additional charges customers may incur for the services as a result of the additional measures that have been put in place.