Hamilton launches reopening campaign to education public

News May 12, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

As Hamilton gradually reopens services and businesses, local officials want the public to understand the dos and don’ts of how to maintain physical distancing measures as the city continues to battle the coronavirus pandemic.

Hamilton has launched an education campaign called “Hamilton Reopens” — which has the ‘O’ giving off yellow sun rays — that highlights what will reopen during the coronavirus pandemic and how to protect not only the public, but also staff.

“What we are trying to do is draw attention when we are releasing information about new things happening in our community,” said Emergency Operations Centre Director Paul Johnson. “You will need to read the information there (and) be aware about what you can do and what you still can’t do.”

The campaign was launched on May 11 at the same time that the province and conservation authorities reopened some trails, conservation areas and provincial parks. The province also allowed non-essential retail businesses that have an entrance onto a street to operate curbside pickup.

On May 8, Hamilton reopened the Waterfront Trail between Confederation Park and the Burlington Lift Bridge, as well as removing the barriers at lots adjacent to city parks.

“We thought (the campaign) would be a nice way to visually identify what things are changing over the next number of weeks,” said Johnson.

After a cold and dreary Mother’s Day weekend, the city has to date issued 140 tickets to people for violating the province’s Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. The majority of the tickets were for using materials that were off limits or venturing into prohibited areas such as a dog park.

Premier Doug Ford said as the coronavirus data trends downward, the province will enter stage one of its reopening plan. He is expected to announce possible reopenings for low-risk workplaces, seasonal business and essential services on May 14.

“I’m confident we can more forward,” Ford said during his daily coronavirus briefing May 12.

Mountain Coun. Esther Pauls, who has been running or biking every day during the pandemic, has been encouraging residents in her ward to get out of the house and get some fresh air. She said some residents have been cooped up in their homes for days not understanding that they can venture outside as long as they respect the physical distancing requirements.

A former small business owner, Pauls said some businesses along Concession Street have been seeing a bump up in orders through their websites during the pandemic.

“Businesses are adapting,” she said. “Some (business owners) are seeing higher sales through online orders. Now they have a platform to do better once they open.”

Meanwhile, the province extended the state of emergency to June 2, which covers closures of bars and restaurants, theatres, outdoor amenities such as playgrounds and child care centres. Ontario previously announced that publicly funded schools will be closed until at least May 31.

The city’s Hamilton Reopen campaign continues to emphasize that under the provincial emergency order, residents are not permitted to gather in groups of more than five. Ignoring that rule can bring a $750 fine under the province’s Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Hamilton has issued two charges under the measure.

Johnson has repeatedly said reopening city facilities and reintroducing services for the public will be a lot tougher than closing them down.

“We are having to look at not only the physical infrastructure but also the operation impact,” said Johnson. “The buildings are not the same. They are not cookie-cutter. We are having to go workplace to workplace. That will take weeks and months to fully implement.”

As of May 12, Hamilton has 490 total cases, with 360 cases or over 70 per cent resolved. There have been 24 deaths.

Dr. Elizabeth Richardson, the city’s medical officer of health, said the city will reopen services once the province provides comprehensive directions.

“We need to be patient just a little bit longer,” she said.

 

 

Hamilton prepares do and don't reopening coronavirus messages to reassure public

News May 12, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

As Hamilton gradually reopens services and businesses, local officials want the public to understand the dos and don’ts of how to maintain physical distancing measures as the city continues to battle the coronavirus pandemic.

Hamilton has launched an education campaign called “Hamilton Reopens” — which has the ‘O’ giving off yellow sun rays — that highlights what will reopen during the coronavirus pandemic and how to protect not only the public, but also staff.

“What we are trying to do is draw attention when we are releasing information about new things happening in our community,” said Emergency Operations Centre Director Paul Johnson. “You will need to read the information there (and) be aware about what you can do and what you still can’t do.”

The campaign was launched on May 11 at the same time that the province and conservation authorities reopened some trails, conservation areas and provincial parks. The province also allowed non-essential retail businesses that have an entrance onto a street to operate curbside pickup.

Related Content

On May 8, Hamilton reopened the Waterfront Trail between Confederation Park and the Burlington Lift Bridge, as well as removing the barriers at lots adjacent to city parks.

“We thought (the campaign) would be a nice way to visually identify what things are changing over the next number of weeks,” said Johnson.

After a cold and dreary Mother’s Day weekend, the city has to date issued 140 tickets to people for violating the province’s Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. The majority of the tickets were for using materials that were off limits or venturing into prohibited areas such as a dog park.

Premier Doug Ford said as the coronavirus data trends downward, the province will enter stage one of its reopening plan. He is expected to announce possible reopenings for low-risk workplaces, seasonal business and essential services on May 14.

“I’m confident we can more forward,” Ford said during his daily coronavirus briefing May 12.

Mountain Coun. Esther Pauls, who has been running or biking every day during the pandemic, has been encouraging residents in her ward to get out of the house and get some fresh air. She said some residents have been cooped up in their homes for days not understanding that they can venture outside as long as they respect the physical distancing requirements.

A former small business owner, Pauls said some businesses along Concession Street have been seeing a bump up in orders through their websites during the pandemic.

“Businesses are adapting,” she said. “Some (business owners) are seeing higher sales through online orders. Now they have a platform to do better once they open.”

Meanwhile, the province extended the state of emergency to June 2, which covers closures of bars and restaurants, theatres, outdoor amenities such as playgrounds and child care centres. Ontario previously announced that publicly funded schools will be closed until at least May 31.

The city’s Hamilton Reopen campaign continues to emphasize that under the provincial emergency order, residents are not permitted to gather in groups of more than five. Ignoring that rule can bring a $750 fine under the province’s Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Hamilton has issued two charges under the measure.

Johnson has repeatedly said reopening city facilities and reintroducing services for the public will be a lot tougher than closing them down.

“We are having to look at not only the physical infrastructure but also the operation impact,” said Johnson. “The buildings are not the same. They are not cookie-cutter. We are having to go workplace to workplace. That will take weeks and months to fully implement.”

As of May 12, Hamilton has 490 total cases, with 360 cases or over 70 per cent resolved. There have been 24 deaths.

Dr. Elizabeth Richardson, the city’s medical officer of health, said the city will reopen services once the province provides comprehensive directions.

“We need to be patient just a little bit longer,” she said.

 

 

Hamilton prepares do and don't reopening coronavirus messages to reassure public

News May 12, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

As Hamilton gradually reopens services and businesses, local officials want the public to understand the dos and don’ts of how to maintain physical distancing measures as the city continues to battle the coronavirus pandemic.

Hamilton has launched an education campaign called “Hamilton Reopens” — which has the ‘O’ giving off yellow sun rays — that highlights what will reopen during the coronavirus pandemic and how to protect not only the public, but also staff.

“What we are trying to do is draw attention when we are releasing information about new things happening in our community,” said Emergency Operations Centre Director Paul Johnson. “You will need to read the information there (and) be aware about what you can do and what you still can’t do.”

The campaign was launched on May 11 at the same time that the province and conservation authorities reopened some trails, conservation areas and provincial parks. The province also allowed non-essential retail businesses that have an entrance onto a street to operate curbside pickup.

Related Content

On May 8, Hamilton reopened the Waterfront Trail between Confederation Park and the Burlington Lift Bridge, as well as removing the barriers at lots adjacent to city parks.

“We thought (the campaign) would be a nice way to visually identify what things are changing over the next number of weeks,” said Johnson.

After a cold and dreary Mother’s Day weekend, the city has to date issued 140 tickets to people for violating the province’s Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. The majority of the tickets were for using materials that were off limits or venturing into prohibited areas such as a dog park.

Premier Doug Ford said as the coronavirus data trends downward, the province will enter stage one of its reopening plan. He is expected to announce possible reopenings for low-risk workplaces, seasonal business and essential services on May 14.

“I’m confident we can more forward,” Ford said during his daily coronavirus briefing May 12.

Mountain Coun. Esther Pauls, who has been running or biking every day during the pandemic, has been encouraging residents in her ward to get out of the house and get some fresh air. She said some residents have been cooped up in their homes for days not understanding that they can venture outside as long as they respect the physical distancing requirements.

A former small business owner, Pauls said some businesses along Concession Street have been seeing a bump up in orders through their websites during the pandemic.

“Businesses are adapting,” she said. “Some (business owners) are seeing higher sales through online orders. Now they have a platform to do better once they open.”

Meanwhile, the province extended the state of emergency to June 2, which covers closures of bars and restaurants, theatres, outdoor amenities such as playgrounds and child care centres. Ontario previously announced that publicly funded schools will be closed until at least May 31.

The city’s Hamilton Reopen campaign continues to emphasize that under the provincial emergency order, residents are not permitted to gather in groups of more than five. Ignoring that rule can bring a $750 fine under the province’s Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act. Hamilton has issued two charges under the measure.

Johnson has repeatedly said reopening city facilities and reintroducing services for the public will be a lot tougher than closing them down.

“We are having to look at not only the physical infrastructure but also the operation impact,” said Johnson. “The buildings are not the same. They are not cookie-cutter. We are having to go workplace to workplace. That will take weeks and months to fully implement.”

As of May 12, Hamilton has 490 total cases, with 360 cases or over 70 per cent resolved. There have been 24 deaths.

Dr. Elizabeth Richardson, the city’s medical officer of health, said the city will reopen services once the province provides comprehensive directions.

“We need to be patient just a little bit longer,” she said.