Stoney Creekers keep active during pandemic

News May 08, 2020 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Patti Moffatt says she likes working out in the company of others, so she worried when her nearby Winona gym could no longer host classes at its Lewis Road storefront after closing due to the coronavirus outbreak.

Luckily, The Energy Lab, where the retired dental hygienist has been a member since it opened three years ago, is offering 30-minute online classes, allowing her to do up to two workouts a day, including yoga sessions.

Moffatt says she’s using a spin bike and weights from the gym, but has found other ways to make up for missing equipment, like using the stairs on her deck for a strength class’s step exercises.

The classes can be viewed live or at her leisure.

“I just put it onto my TV, so it even kind of makes it feel more like you’re in the room. It’s not the same, but it’s what we have,” says Moffatt, 56.

“It’s been a lifesaver, as far as having something to kind of motivate you and somebody to follow because I’m not normally motivated to work out at home on my own.”

Diane Hughes, a 72-year-old member, says online workouts helped her overcome the feeling of being “in a prison” as she heeds advice to stay at home.

She has been inventive, using water-filled wine bottles as weights before getting some real ones, but says she misses the camaraderie of the gym, even if she likes being able to watch classes on her own schedule.

“I feel like I’ve accomplished something,” Hughes says. “And I’m staying in shape.”

Joelle Turner, The Energy Lab’s owner, says she started offering online classes about a year ago for members going on vacation, but never took it seriously until the pandemic shut her gym’s doors.

She says virtual classes are now key to her 4,000-square-foot gym’s survival because her landlord won’t apply for a federal program that would subsidize half of her $8,000 monthly rent in return for cutting payments by 75 per cent.

“Online is everything. It’s all I have,” she says, crediting her instructors for helping keep her afloat by teaching classes from home for free.

Turner says she’s been able to keep 80 members, or about half, by dropping their monthly fee to $30 from $80.

She says she’s also rented spin bikes, exercise balls and steps, but it’s not enough to cover rent.

Even so, Turner says she’s hopeful she’ll be able to reopen in June. In the meantime, she’s making the best of a bad situation, including by improvising on equipment, using a chair for one workout.

“People were sore for, like, three days,” she says with a laugh.

Tara Hansen-Rix and Elda Giardetti, co-owners of Modo Yoga studio in upper Stoney Creek, have also embraced online classes.

Unlike Turner, Hansen-Rix says they’ve had great support from their landlord, allowing them to run three free classes per day on Instagram that can be viewed live or on tape within 24 hours.

Donations are encouraged and many members at their two local studios have kept paid memberships, she says, with classes attracting an average of 300 viewers, 20 to 80 doing so live.

“The silver lining is our Instagram following has grown exponentially,” Hansen-Rix says. “I think that when you take something away, it makes people want it more.”

Rebecca Barty, a 10-year member, says online sessions can’t match the hot yoga classes offered in studio, where a 40 degree temperature induces sweat, but help her “feel connected to the community” while working from home.

The realtor and regional manager for an Ontario blood transfusion network at McMaster University’s Department of Medicine says she’s been taking online yoga or barre classes every day.

“They’ve been providing a distraction, but in a positive way, and a break from the news of everything related to COVID,” says Barty, 48. “They’ve been something to look forward to, to take a nice pause and do something good for your soul and for your body.”


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: With the pandemic closing gyms and yoga studios, we wanted to see if groups of people are still finding ways to exercise and stay healthy.

Stoney Creekers find ways to keep active during pandemic

Internet and innovation key to exercise classes #healthyathome

News May 08, 2020 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Patti Moffatt says she likes working out in the company of others, so she worried when her nearby Winona gym could no longer host classes at its Lewis Road storefront after closing due to the coronavirus outbreak.

Luckily, The Energy Lab, where the retired dental hygienist has been a member since it opened three years ago, is offering 30-minute online classes, allowing her to do up to two workouts a day, including yoga sessions.

Moffatt says she’s using a spin bike and weights from the gym, but has found other ways to make up for missing equipment, like using the stairs on her deck for a strength class’s step exercises.

The classes can be viewed live or at her leisure.

Related Content

“I just put it onto my TV, so it even kind of makes it feel more like you’re in the room. It’s not the same, but it’s what we have,” says Moffatt, 56.

“It’s been a lifesaver, as far as having something to kind of motivate you and somebody to follow because I’m not normally motivated to work out at home on my own.”

Diane Hughes, a 72-year-old member, says online workouts helped her overcome the feeling of being “in a prison” as she heeds advice to stay at home.

She has been inventive, using water-filled wine bottles as weights before getting some real ones, but says she misses the camaraderie of the gym, even if she likes being able to watch classes on her own schedule.

“I feel like I’ve accomplished something,” Hughes says. “And I’m staying in shape.”

Joelle Turner, The Energy Lab’s owner, says she started offering online classes about a year ago for members going on vacation, but never took it seriously until the pandemic shut her gym’s doors.

She says virtual classes are now key to her 4,000-square-foot gym’s survival because her landlord won’t apply for a federal program that would subsidize half of her $8,000 monthly rent in return for cutting payments by 75 per cent.

“Online is everything. It’s all I have,” she says, crediting her instructors for helping keep her afloat by teaching classes from home for free.

Turner says she’s been able to keep 80 members, or about half, by dropping their monthly fee to $30 from $80.

She says she’s also rented spin bikes, exercise balls and steps, but it’s not enough to cover rent.

Even so, Turner says she’s hopeful she’ll be able to reopen in June. In the meantime, she’s making the best of a bad situation, including by improvising on equipment, using a chair for one workout.

“People were sore for, like, three days,” she says with a laugh.

Tara Hansen-Rix and Elda Giardetti, co-owners of Modo Yoga studio in upper Stoney Creek, have also embraced online classes.

Unlike Turner, Hansen-Rix says they’ve had great support from their landlord, allowing them to run three free classes per day on Instagram that can be viewed live or on tape within 24 hours.

Donations are encouraged and many members at their two local studios have kept paid memberships, she says, with classes attracting an average of 300 viewers, 20 to 80 doing so live.

“The silver lining is our Instagram following has grown exponentially,” Hansen-Rix says. “I think that when you take something away, it makes people want it more.”

Rebecca Barty, a 10-year member, says online sessions can’t match the hot yoga classes offered in studio, where a 40 degree temperature induces sweat, but help her “feel connected to the community” while working from home.

The realtor and regional manager for an Ontario blood transfusion network at McMaster University’s Department of Medicine says she’s been taking online yoga or barre classes every day.

“They’ve been providing a distraction, but in a positive way, and a break from the news of everything related to COVID,” says Barty, 48. “They’ve been something to look forward to, to take a nice pause and do something good for your soul and for your body.”


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: With the pandemic closing gyms and yoga studios, we wanted to see if groups of people are still finding ways to exercise and stay healthy.

Stoney Creekers find ways to keep active during pandemic

Internet and innovation key to exercise classes #healthyathome

News May 08, 2020 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Patti Moffatt says she likes working out in the company of others, so she worried when her nearby Winona gym could no longer host classes at its Lewis Road storefront after closing due to the coronavirus outbreak.

Luckily, The Energy Lab, where the retired dental hygienist has been a member since it opened three years ago, is offering 30-minute online classes, allowing her to do up to two workouts a day, including yoga sessions.

Moffatt says she’s using a spin bike and weights from the gym, but has found other ways to make up for missing equipment, like using the stairs on her deck for a strength class’s step exercises.

The classes can be viewed live or at her leisure.

Related Content

“I just put it onto my TV, so it even kind of makes it feel more like you’re in the room. It’s not the same, but it’s what we have,” says Moffatt, 56.

“It’s been a lifesaver, as far as having something to kind of motivate you and somebody to follow because I’m not normally motivated to work out at home on my own.”

Diane Hughes, a 72-year-old member, says online workouts helped her overcome the feeling of being “in a prison” as she heeds advice to stay at home.

She has been inventive, using water-filled wine bottles as weights before getting some real ones, but says she misses the camaraderie of the gym, even if she likes being able to watch classes on her own schedule.

“I feel like I’ve accomplished something,” Hughes says. “And I’m staying in shape.”

Joelle Turner, The Energy Lab’s owner, says she started offering online classes about a year ago for members going on vacation, but never took it seriously until the pandemic shut her gym’s doors.

She says virtual classes are now key to her 4,000-square-foot gym’s survival because her landlord won’t apply for a federal program that would subsidize half of her $8,000 monthly rent in return for cutting payments by 75 per cent.

“Online is everything. It’s all I have,” she says, crediting her instructors for helping keep her afloat by teaching classes from home for free.

Turner says she’s been able to keep 80 members, or about half, by dropping their monthly fee to $30 from $80.

She says she’s also rented spin bikes, exercise balls and steps, but it’s not enough to cover rent.

Even so, Turner says she’s hopeful she’ll be able to reopen in June. In the meantime, she’s making the best of a bad situation, including by improvising on equipment, using a chair for one workout.

“People were sore for, like, three days,” she says with a laugh.

Tara Hansen-Rix and Elda Giardetti, co-owners of Modo Yoga studio in upper Stoney Creek, have also embraced online classes.

Unlike Turner, Hansen-Rix says they’ve had great support from their landlord, allowing them to run three free classes per day on Instagram that can be viewed live or on tape within 24 hours.

Donations are encouraged and many members at their two local studios have kept paid memberships, she says, with classes attracting an average of 300 viewers, 20 to 80 doing so live.

“The silver lining is our Instagram following has grown exponentially,” Hansen-Rix says. “I think that when you take something away, it makes people want it more.”

Rebecca Barty, a 10-year member, says online sessions can’t match the hot yoga classes offered in studio, where a 40 degree temperature induces sweat, but help her “feel connected to the community” while working from home.

The realtor and regional manager for an Ontario blood transfusion network at McMaster University’s Department of Medicine says she’s been taking online yoga or barre classes every day.

“They’ve been providing a distraction, but in a positive way, and a break from the news of everything related to COVID,” says Barty, 48. “They’ve been something to look forward to, to take a nice pause and do something good for your soul and for your body.”


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: With the pandemic closing gyms and yoga studios, we wanted to see if groups of people are still finding ways to exercise and stay healthy.