Fieldcote Memorial Park and Museum curator Lois Corey running half-marathon for Hamilton Food Share during coronavirus pandemic

News May 07, 2020 by Mike Pearson Ancaster News

Like many people right now, Lois Corey is working from home during the novel coronavirus pandemic.

These days Corey, curator of Fieldcote Memorial Park and Museum, is connecting with her staff via Zoom meetings and checking up on the buildings she looks after, such as the museum, the Old Town Hall and Griffin House.

Without her usual morning commute, Corey has had more time to exercise. Her usual weekend social gatherings with family and friends are cancelled as well, giving her extra workout time. The problem, though, is that many of the trails near her rural Flamborough home are closed to maintain physical distancing. And while she has a treadmill in her basement, she prefers to run outdoors.

But instead of allowing her fitness goals to fall by the wayside, Corey is using the pandemic as an opportunity to stay fit on her own terms. She’s turning 65 in June and plans to complete a run equivalent to a half-marathon during the weekend of May 30.

“I decided, to keep myself motivated and stay fit, I’d make a goal of doing a half-marathon before my birthday,” she said.

Corey mapped out a half-marathon route on the country roads near home. While she’s always enjoyed distance running – including running the Around the Bay Road Race 10 times – she hasn’t competed in an organized half-marathon in two years.

Over the last few weeks, Corey has been staying in touch with family and friends who are also runners.

“I’m connecting more with people – with friends, with my own family – than I have before. For me, that’s been a positive side of things. I recognize I’ve been very fortunate,” Corey said.

She’s also been taking part in a virtual online running clinic offered by the Runner’s Den in Westdale, which provides a weekly training regimen that participants can follow.

“It’s a way of linking people up so they don’t get too isolated,” said Corey.

Corey’s personal half-marathon will also serve as a fundraiser for Hamilton Food Share. Corey said she feels fortunate to still be working at a time when so many have been left without jobs due to COVID-19. She’s launched an online fundraiser through Canadahelps.org, where donors can contribute to her efforts.

With support from her husband, Ted Chamberlain, and possibly some family members cheering her on from a safe social distance, Corey plans to run her half-marathon on the nicest day of the final May weekend.

Until then, she’s running at least two, if not three shorter runs through the week and a longer run on Saturdays. Each Saturday she adds two kilometres to her “long” run, working her way up to the full half-marathon length.

Escarpment stairs off-limits

West Hamilton resident Allen Rams is also finding creative ways to stay fit now that his usual routine – running the Chedoke stairs – is unavailable.

Rams, 77 years young, used to arrive at the stairs around 5 a.m. each morning before all of the city's escarpment stairs were closed.

“In the morning, the fresh air and seeing the sunrise is marvellous,” he said.

From December through March, Rams estimates he climbed the equivalent of the Eiffel Tower eight times each month and logged 125 walking miles in March.

Today he exercises with his wife, walking about six kilometres daily along the rail trail from Main Street West near Fortinos to the Chedoke Golf Club. He’s also more actively climbing the stairs in his nine-storey condominium building.

Last month, walking the condo stairs, he managed to accumulate a distance equivalent to the Eiffel Tower twice.

In May, Rams and his wife have made a fitness resolution to continue their trail walking and stair climbing.

“So far, this first week (of May) I have done the equivalent of the Eiffel Tower three times and tomorrow (May 8) I should have completed the fourth,” Rams said on May 7.

Hike for Hospice goes virtual

With its biggest annual fundraiser impacted by the pandemic, the Dr. Bob Kemp Hospice has launched a virtual Hike for Hospice event, with registration available online until June 13.

Mountain Coun. Esther Pauls, a prolific runner, wanted to help the hospice during this time of need and signed up for the virtual run.

“All charities are suffering, and I wanted to do something to raise funds for Bob Kemp,” she said. “The funding is needed.”

Pauls is the captain of her City of Hamilton team for the organization’s virtual 5K hike. Pauls said she is committing to running or walking 5K every day until June.

“I am inviting others to do their own walk or run in their neighbourhood on one or more of those days,” said Pauls, adding she will be encouraging her council colleagues to join her.

Every year the Hike for Hospice event raises up to $115,000, which is a significant amount of funding for the charitable organization. The proceeds from the fundraising event go directly to the Dr. Bob Kemp Hospice to help families.

— With files from Kevin Werner.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: We wanted to find out how local people are finding innovative ways to stay active during the coronavirus pandemic.

 

Fieldcote Memorial Park and Museum curator Lois Corey running half-marathon for Hamilton Food Share during coronavirus pandemic

#healthyathome

News May 07, 2020 by Mike Pearson Ancaster News

Like many people right now, Lois Corey is working from home during the novel coronavirus pandemic.

These days Corey, curator of Fieldcote Memorial Park and Museum, is connecting with her staff via Zoom meetings and checking up on the buildings she looks after, such as the museum, the Old Town Hall and Griffin House.

Without her usual morning commute, Corey has had more time to exercise. Her usual weekend social gatherings with family and friends are cancelled as well, giving her extra workout time. The problem, though, is that many of the trails near her rural Flamborough home are closed to maintain physical distancing. And while she has a treadmill in her basement, she prefers to run outdoors.

But instead of allowing her fitness goals to fall by the wayside, Corey is using the pandemic as an opportunity to stay fit on her own terms. She’s turning 65 in June and plans to complete a run equivalent to a half-marathon during the weekend of May 30.

Related Content

“I decided, to keep myself motivated and stay fit, I’d make a goal of doing a half-marathon before my birthday,” she said.

Corey mapped out a half-marathon route on the country roads near home. While she’s always enjoyed distance running – including running the Around the Bay Road Race 10 times – she hasn’t competed in an organized half-marathon in two years.

Over the last few weeks, Corey has been staying in touch with family and friends who are also runners.

“I’m connecting more with people – with friends, with my own family – than I have before. For me, that’s been a positive side of things. I recognize I’ve been very fortunate,” Corey said.

She’s also been taking part in a virtual online running clinic offered by the Runner’s Den in Westdale, which provides a weekly training regimen that participants can follow.

“It’s a way of linking people up so they don’t get too isolated,” said Corey.

Corey’s personal half-marathon will also serve as a fundraiser for Hamilton Food Share. Corey said she feels fortunate to still be working at a time when so many have been left without jobs due to COVID-19. She’s launched an online fundraiser through Canadahelps.org, where donors can contribute to her efforts.

With support from her husband, Ted Chamberlain, and possibly some family members cheering her on from a safe social distance, Corey plans to run her half-marathon on the nicest day of the final May weekend.

Until then, she’s running at least two, if not three shorter runs through the week and a longer run on Saturdays. Each Saturday she adds two kilometres to her “long” run, working her way up to the full half-marathon length.

Escarpment stairs off-limits

West Hamilton resident Allen Rams is also finding creative ways to stay fit now that his usual routine – running the Chedoke stairs – is unavailable.

Rams, 77 years young, used to arrive at the stairs around 5 a.m. each morning before all of the city's escarpment stairs were closed.

“In the morning, the fresh air and seeing the sunrise is marvellous,” he said.

From December through March, Rams estimates he climbed the equivalent of the Eiffel Tower eight times each month and logged 125 walking miles in March.

Today he exercises with his wife, walking about six kilometres daily along the rail trail from Main Street West near Fortinos to the Chedoke Golf Club. He’s also more actively climbing the stairs in his nine-storey condominium building.

Last month, walking the condo stairs, he managed to accumulate a distance equivalent to the Eiffel Tower twice.

In May, Rams and his wife have made a fitness resolution to continue their trail walking and stair climbing.

“So far, this first week (of May) I have done the equivalent of the Eiffel Tower three times and tomorrow (May 8) I should have completed the fourth,” Rams said on May 7.

Hike for Hospice goes virtual

With its biggest annual fundraiser impacted by the pandemic, the Dr. Bob Kemp Hospice has launched a virtual Hike for Hospice event, with registration available online until June 13.

Mountain Coun. Esther Pauls, a prolific runner, wanted to help the hospice during this time of need and signed up for the virtual run.

“All charities are suffering, and I wanted to do something to raise funds for Bob Kemp,” she said. “The funding is needed.”

Pauls is the captain of her City of Hamilton team for the organization’s virtual 5K hike. Pauls said she is committing to running or walking 5K every day until June.

“I am inviting others to do their own walk or run in their neighbourhood on one or more of those days,” said Pauls, adding she will be encouraging her council colleagues to join her.

Every year the Hike for Hospice event raises up to $115,000, which is a significant amount of funding for the charitable organization. The proceeds from the fundraising event go directly to the Dr. Bob Kemp Hospice to help families.

— With files from Kevin Werner.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: We wanted to find out how local people are finding innovative ways to stay active during the coronavirus pandemic.

 

Fieldcote Memorial Park and Museum curator Lois Corey running half-marathon for Hamilton Food Share during coronavirus pandemic

#healthyathome

News May 07, 2020 by Mike Pearson Ancaster News

Like many people right now, Lois Corey is working from home during the novel coronavirus pandemic.

These days Corey, curator of Fieldcote Memorial Park and Museum, is connecting with her staff via Zoom meetings and checking up on the buildings she looks after, such as the museum, the Old Town Hall and Griffin House.

Without her usual morning commute, Corey has had more time to exercise. Her usual weekend social gatherings with family and friends are cancelled as well, giving her extra workout time. The problem, though, is that many of the trails near her rural Flamborough home are closed to maintain physical distancing. And while she has a treadmill in her basement, she prefers to run outdoors.

But instead of allowing her fitness goals to fall by the wayside, Corey is using the pandemic as an opportunity to stay fit on her own terms. She’s turning 65 in June and plans to complete a run equivalent to a half-marathon during the weekend of May 30.

Related Content

“I decided, to keep myself motivated and stay fit, I’d make a goal of doing a half-marathon before my birthday,” she said.

Corey mapped out a half-marathon route on the country roads near home. While she’s always enjoyed distance running – including running the Around the Bay Road Race 10 times – she hasn’t competed in an organized half-marathon in two years.

Over the last few weeks, Corey has been staying in touch with family and friends who are also runners.

“I’m connecting more with people – with friends, with my own family – than I have before. For me, that’s been a positive side of things. I recognize I’ve been very fortunate,” Corey said.

She’s also been taking part in a virtual online running clinic offered by the Runner’s Den in Westdale, which provides a weekly training regimen that participants can follow.

“It’s a way of linking people up so they don’t get too isolated,” said Corey.

Corey’s personal half-marathon will also serve as a fundraiser for Hamilton Food Share. Corey said she feels fortunate to still be working at a time when so many have been left without jobs due to COVID-19. She’s launched an online fundraiser through Canadahelps.org, where donors can contribute to her efforts.

With support from her husband, Ted Chamberlain, and possibly some family members cheering her on from a safe social distance, Corey plans to run her half-marathon on the nicest day of the final May weekend.

Until then, she’s running at least two, if not three shorter runs through the week and a longer run on Saturdays. Each Saturday she adds two kilometres to her “long” run, working her way up to the full half-marathon length.

Escarpment stairs off-limits

West Hamilton resident Allen Rams is also finding creative ways to stay fit now that his usual routine – running the Chedoke stairs – is unavailable.

Rams, 77 years young, used to arrive at the stairs around 5 a.m. each morning before all of the city's escarpment stairs were closed.

“In the morning, the fresh air and seeing the sunrise is marvellous,” he said.

From December through March, Rams estimates he climbed the equivalent of the Eiffel Tower eight times each month and logged 125 walking miles in March.

Today he exercises with his wife, walking about six kilometres daily along the rail trail from Main Street West near Fortinos to the Chedoke Golf Club. He’s also more actively climbing the stairs in his nine-storey condominium building.

Last month, walking the condo stairs, he managed to accumulate a distance equivalent to the Eiffel Tower twice.

In May, Rams and his wife have made a fitness resolution to continue their trail walking and stair climbing.

“So far, this first week (of May) I have done the equivalent of the Eiffel Tower three times and tomorrow (May 8) I should have completed the fourth,” Rams said on May 7.

Hike for Hospice goes virtual

With its biggest annual fundraiser impacted by the pandemic, the Dr. Bob Kemp Hospice has launched a virtual Hike for Hospice event, with registration available online until June 13.

Mountain Coun. Esther Pauls, a prolific runner, wanted to help the hospice during this time of need and signed up for the virtual run.

“All charities are suffering, and I wanted to do something to raise funds for Bob Kemp,” she said. “The funding is needed.”

Pauls is the captain of her City of Hamilton team for the organization’s virtual 5K hike. Pauls said she is committing to running or walking 5K every day until June.

“I am inviting others to do their own walk or run in their neighbourhood on one or more of those days,” said Pauls, adding she will be encouraging her council colleagues to join her.

Every year the Hike for Hospice event raises up to $115,000, which is a significant amount of funding for the charitable organization. The proceeds from the fundraising event go directly to the Dr. Bob Kemp Hospice to help families.

— With files from Kevin Werner.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: We wanted to find out how local people are finding innovative ways to stay active during the coronavirus pandemic.