Hamilton has laid over 100 charges against businesses and individuals during pandemic

News Apr 30, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton’s Director of Licensing Ken Leendertse said the city’s bylaw officers have laid more than 100 charges against businesses and individuals for non-compliance with the province’s emergency measures during the coronavirus pandemic.

During the April 29 virtual town hall meeting, Leendertse said bylaw officers laid seven charges for non-essential businesses operating during the pandemic, while two charges were laid against people not physically distancing, and seven people were charged for using closed dog parks.

Since the provincial measures have been enacted, and council’s approval of a bylaw for not following physical distancing rules, there have been at least 12 charges laid for gatherings of more than five people. Those fines carry a $500 fine for not keeping two metres apart.

Ward 4 Coun. Sam Merulla said most Hamiltonians accept that enforcement is needed, and the majority of citizens are following the rules. But there are some people who “don’t understand the importance of this distancing and how it plays a role” in reducing the spread of the coronavirus.

Leendertse said there have been six charges laid against individuals for obstructing officers, a new charge that was introduced under the province’s Emergency Management and Civil Protections Act. Under the measure, individuals are required to produce identification to a law enforcement officer when requested.

“You must not obstruct a (bylaw officer’s) duties,” which could result in a $1,000 fine he said.

Leendertse said officers attended a “couple of house parties” recently and the people involved “were not co-operative.”

Those individuals were issued $1,000 tickets, he added.

Individuals who do not follow emergency orders can be issued a ticket with a possible fine of $750, or a court summons with a possible punishment of up to one year imprisonment or a fine of up to $100,000.

Leendertse said bylaw officials continue to monitor so-called hot spots for gatherings, such as at Albion Falls, the Devil’s Punchbowl, the Dundas Driving Park and Battlefield House Museum and Park in Stoney Creek.

He said officers have found people having picnics and using the equipment in the now closed Battlefield Park.

Earlier in April, Hamilton bylaw officers issued more than 300 tickets to vehicles illegally parked at Albion Falls after the city closed all waterfalls and parking areas. Leendertse said that still has not dissuaded people, predominately from out of the area, to visit Albion Falls.

The Hamilton Amateur Athletic Association Grounds located on the north side of Charlton Avenue West, between Locke Street South and Queen Street South, is also becoming a hot spot for activity said Leendertse.

“There are lots of people using the grounds, playing soccer games,” he said. “Our officers are going to be there.”

He said Hamilton’s parks are open for people to walk through, but the amenities within the open spaces are closed.

“The provincial government did this on purpose so that we can keep physical distancing, so we don’t spread this virus around,” he said.

Leendertse said bylaw officers continue to patrol the waterfront trails and the escarpment stairs, which tends to draw people from across the area. The city was forced to close the stairs after individuals refused to follow physical distancing measures.

People are continuing to use Chedoke Golf Course as leash-free parks and some individuals are still playing a round of golf, said Leendertse.

“One couple was treasure hunting on the fairway with metal detectors,” he added.

Hamilton has laid over 100 charges against individuals and businesses during coronavirus pandemic

Both individuals and businesses have been fined

News Apr 30, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton’s Director of Licensing Ken Leendertse said the city’s bylaw officers have laid more than 100 charges against businesses and individuals for non-compliance with the province’s emergency measures during the coronavirus pandemic.

During the April 29 virtual town hall meeting, Leendertse said bylaw officers laid seven charges for non-essential businesses operating during the pandemic, while two charges were laid against people not physically distancing, and seven people were charged for using closed dog parks.

Since the provincial measures have been enacted, and council’s approval of a bylaw for not following physical distancing rules, there have been at least 12 charges laid for gatherings of more than five people. Those fines carry a $500 fine for not keeping two metres apart.

Ward 4 Coun. Sam Merulla said most Hamiltonians accept that enforcement is needed, and the majority of citizens are following the rules. But there are some people who “don’t understand the importance of this distancing and how it plays a role” in reducing the spread of the coronavirus.

Related Content

Leendertse said there have been six charges laid against individuals for obstructing officers, a new charge that was introduced under the province’s Emergency Management and Civil Protections Act. Under the measure, individuals are required to produce identification to a law enforcement officer when requested.

“You must not obstruct a (bylaw officer’s) duties,” which could result in a $1,000 fine he said.

Leendertse said officers attended a “couple of house parties” recently and the people involved “were not co-operative.”

Those individuals were issued $1,000 tickets, he added.

Individuals who do not follow emergency orders can be issued a ticket with a possible fine of $750, or a court summons with a possible punishment of up to one year imprisonment or a fine of up to $100,000.

Leendertse said bylaw officials continue to monitor so-called hot spots for gatherings, such as at Albion Falls, the Devil’s Punchbowl, the Dundas Driving Park and Battlefield House Museum and Park in Stoney Creek.

He said officers have found people having picnics and using the equipment in the now closed Battlefield Park.

Earlier in April, Hamilton bylaw officers issued more than 300 tickets to vehicles illegally parked at Albion Falls after the city closed all waterfalls and parking areas. Leendertse said that still has not dissuaded people, predominately from out of the area, to visit Albion Falls.

The Hamilton Amateur Athletic Association Grounds located on the north side of Charlton Avenue West, between Locke Street South and Queen Street South, is also becoming a hot spot for activity said Leendertse.

“There are lots of people using the grounds, playing soccer games,” he said. “Our officers are going to be there.”

He said Hamilton’s parks are open for people to walk through, but the amenities within the open spaces are closed.

“The provincial government did this on purpose so that we can keep physical distancing, so we don’t spread this virus around,” he said.

Leendertse said bylaw officers continue to patrol the waterfront trails and the escarpment stairs, which tends to draw people from across the area. The city was forced to close the stairs after individuals refused to follow physical distancing measures.

People are continuing to use Chedoke Golf Course as leash-free parks and some individuals are still playing a round of golf, said Leendertse.

“One couple was treasure hunting on the fairway with metal detectors,” he added.

Hamilton has laid over 100 charges against individuals and businesses during coronavirus pandemic

Both individuals and businesses have been fined

News Apr 30, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton’s Director of Licensing Ken Leendertse said the city’s bylaw officers have laid more than 100 charges against businesses and individuals for non-compliance with the province’s emergency measures during the coronavirus pandemic.

During the April 29 virtual town hall meeting, Leendertse said bylaw officers laid seven charges for non-essential businesses operating during the pandemic, while two charges were laid against people not physically distancing, and seven people were charged for using closed dog parks.

Since the provincial measures have been enacted, and council’s approval of a bylaw for not following physical distancing rules, there have been at least 12 charges laid for gatherings of more than five people. Those fines carry a $500 fine for not keeping two metres apart.

Ward 4 Coun. Sam Merulla said most Hamiltonians accept that enforcement is needed, and the majority of citizens are following the rules. But there are some people who “don’t understand the importance of this distancing and how it plays a role” in reducing the spread of the coronavirus.

Related Content

Leendertse said there have been six charges laid against individuals for obstructing officers, a new charge that was introduced under the province’s Emergency Management and Civil Protections Act. Under the measure, individuals are required to produce identification to a law enforcement officer when requested.

“You must not obstruct a (bylaw officer’s) duties,” which could result in a $1,000 fine he said.

Leendertse said officers attended a “couple of house parties” recently and the people involved “were not co-operative.”

Those individuals were issued $1,000 tickets, he added.

Individuals who do not follow emergency orders can be issued a ticket with a possible fine of $750, or a court summons with a possible punishment of up to one year imprisonment or a fine of up to $100,000.

Leendertse said bylaw officials continue to monitor so-called hot spots for gatherings, such as at Albion Falls, the Devil’s Punchbowl, the Dundas Driving Park and Battlefield House Museum and Park in Stoney Creek.

He said officers have found people having picnics and using the equipment in the now closed Battlefield Park.

Earlier in April, Hamilton bylaw officers issued more than 300 tickets to vehicles illegally parked at Albion Falls after the city closed all waterfalls and parking areas. Leendertse said that still has not dissuaded people, predominately from out of the area, to visit Albion Falls.

The Hamilton Amateur Athletic Association Grounds located on the north side of Charlton Avenue West, between Locke Street South and Queen Street South, is also becoming a hot spot for activity said Leendertse.

“There are lots of people using the grounds, playing soccer games,” he said. “Our officers are going to be there.”

He said Hamilton’s parks are open for people to walk through, but the amenities within the open spaces are closed.

“The provincial government did this on purpose so that we can keep physical distancing, so we don’t spread this virus around,” he said.

Leendertse said bylaw officers continue to patrol the waterfront trails and the escarpment stairs, which tends to draw people from across the area. The city was forced to close the stairs after individuals refused to follow physical distancing measures.

People are continuing to use Chedoke Golf Course as leash-free parks and some individuals are still playing a round of golf, said Leendertse.

“One couple was treasure hunting on the fairway with metal detectors,” he added.