Pandemic may still Confederation Beach Park’s Wild Waterworks

News Apr 29, 2020 by Richard Leitner hamiltonnews.com

People hoping to beat the heat this summer at Confederation Beach Park’s Wild Waterworks wave pool may be out of luck — along with about 120 seasonal employees.

The Hamilton Conservation Authority, which runs Confederation park for the city, is recommending Wild Waterworks not open this year because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson, the authority’s chair, said the call reflects concerns about the ability to maintain physical distancing in the wave pool and on slides and other water features.

He stressed the decision is up to city council, but said it would likely be optimistic for the water park to open by July 1 should the authority be told to proceed as usual.

“We’ve struggled with this for a significant amount of time,” Ferguson said.

“Just trying to sort out the logistics of getting all the (inner) tubes that are handed out and all the life jackets sterilized before the next one gets it, and with the problem of the waves throwing young people around and bumping into each other, is probably not practical.”

Ferguson said the authority still plans to open Confederation’s Lakeland pool this summer because it’s easier to control physical distancing there and people aren’t exchanging inner tubes.

“That could change, too,” he said. “Right now, we don’t have authority to open it, but if we do, we still intend to go ahead.”

Should the water park be shuttered for the summer, it will result in the loss of about 120 seasonal jobs, including lifeguards, waterslide attendants, cashiers, food servers and cooks, security officers and maintenance staff.

The authority runs Confederation Beach Park and its amenities for a management fee of 15 per cent of operating expenses.

Wild Waterworks generated $2.9 million in revenue in 2019, about $137,000 more than expenses, which included a $360,000 management fee, recent financial statements for the authority show.

The potential shuttering of Wild Waterworks comes as all conservation areas remain closed because of an emergency provincial order that didn’t include them among essential services.

The order remains in effect until at least May 6, but could be extended.

Ferguson said conservation areas generate about $8 million per year, offsetting other expenses, and the closure will have a budget impact.

He said he hopes the authority will get permission to at least open rail trails through conservation areas, even if the parks remain closed.

Rail trails are wide enough to maintain a two-metre separation when users pass by one another, he said, unlike foot trails by Webster’s Falls and other areas where people often crowd to take in the view.

 

Pandemic may still Confederation Beach Park’s Wild Waterworks

Conservation authority recommends wave pool stay closed this summer

News Apr 29, 2020 by Richard Leitner hamiltonnews.com

People hoping to beat the heat this summer at Confederation Beach Park’s Wild Waterworks wave pool may be out of luck — along with about 120 seasonal employees.

The Hamilton Conservation Authority, which runs Confederation park for the city, is recommending Wild Waterworks not open this year because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson, the authority’s chair, said the call reflects concerns about the ability to maintain physical distancing in the wave pool and on slides and other water features.

He stressed the decision is up to city council, but said it would likely be optimistic for the water park to open by July 1 should the authority be told to proceed as usual.

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“We’ve struggled with this for a significant amount of time,” Ferguson said.

“Just trying to sort out the logistics of getting all the (inner) tubes that are handed out and all the life jackets sterilized before the next one gets it, and with the problem of the waves throwing young people around and bumping into each other, is probably not practical.”

Ferguson said the authority still plans to open Confederation’s Lakeland pool this summer because it’s easier to control physical distancing there and people aren’t exchanging inner tubes.

“That could change, too,” he said. “Right now, we don’t have authority to open it, but if we do, we still intend to go ahead.”

Should the water park be shuttered for the summer, it will result in the loss of about 120 seasonal jobs, including lifeguards, waterslide attendants, cashiers, food servers and cooks, security officers and maintenance staff.

The authority runs Confederation Beach Park and its amenities for a management fee of 15 per cent of operating expenses.

Wild Waterworks generated $2.9 million in revenue in 2019, about $137,000 more than expenses, which included a $360,000 management fee, recent financial statements for the authority show.

The potential shuttering of Wild Waterworks comes as all conservation areas remain closed because of an emergency provincial order that didn’t include them among essential services.

The order remains in effect until at least May 6, but could be extended.

Ferguson said conservation areas generate about $8 million per year, offsetting other expenses, and the closure will have a budget impact.

He said he hopes the authority will get permission to at least open rail trails through conservation areas, even if the parks remain closed.

Rail trails are wide enough to maintain a two-metre separation when users pass by one another, he said, unlike foot trails by Webster’s Falls and other areas where people often crowd to take in the view.

 

Pandemic may still Confederation Beach Park’s Wild Waterworks

Conservation authority recommends wave pool stay closed this summer

News Apr 29, 2020 by Richard Leitner hamiltonnews.com

People hoping to beat the heat this summer at Confederation Beach Park’s Wild Waterworks wave pool may be out of luck — along with about 120 seasonal employees.

The Hamilton Conservation Authority, which runs Confederation park for the city, is recommending Wild Waterworks not open this year because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson, the authority’s chair, said the call reflects concerns about the ability to maintain physical distancing in the wave pool and on slides and other water features.

He stressed the decision is up to city council, but said it would likely be optimistic for the water park to open by July 1 should the authority be told to proceed as usual.

Related Content

“We’ve struggled with this for a significant amount of time,” Ferguson said.

“Just trying to sort out the logistics of getting all the (inner) tubes that are handed out and all the life jackets sterilized before the next one gets it, and with the problem of the waves throwing young people around and bumping into each other, is probably not practical.”

Ferguson said the authority still plans to open Confederation’s Lakeland pool this summer because it’s easier to control physical distancing there and people aren’t exchanging inner tubes.

“That could change, too,” he said. “Right now, we don’t have authority to open it, but if we do, we still intend to go ahead.”

Should the water park be shuttered for the summer, it will result in the loss of about 120 seasonal jobs, including lifeguards, waterslide attendants, cashiers, food servers and cooks, security officers and maintenance staff.

The authority runs Confederation Beach Park and its amenities for a management fee of 15 per cent of operating expenses.

Wild Waterworks generated $2.9 million in revenue in 2019, about $137,000 more than expenses, which included a $360,000 management fee, recent financial statements for the authority show.

The potential shuttering of Wild Waterworks comes as all conservation areas remain closed because of an emergency provincial order that didn’t include them among essential services.

The order remains in effect until at least May 6, but could be extended.

Ferguson said conservation areas generate about $8 million per year, offsetting other expenses, and the closure will have a budget impact.

He said he hopes the authority will get permission to at least open rail trails through conservation areas, even if the parks remain closed.

Rail trails are wide enough to maintain a two-metre separation when users pass by one another, he said, unlike foot trails by Webster’s Falls and other areas where people often crowd to take in the view.