Copetown's ManoRun Organic Farm ready to feed appetite for local food during coronavirus pandemic

News Apr 28, 2020 by Mike Pearson Ancaster News

Chris Krucker of ManoRun Organic Farm hopes a growing demand for locally sourced food will help guide his Copetown farm through the coronavirus pandemic.

ManoRun operates under a community supported agriculture model, whereby members purchase seasonal shares in exchange for a weekly harvest basket of fresh produce.

While the growing season is still a few weeks away, ManoRun has already sold out its allotted 150 farm shares and has started a wait list for additional members.

That’s the good news.

The bad news is the farm’s restaurant sales have completely dried up, as dining rooms across the province are shuttered. There’s also some uncertainty over farmers markets, including the Dundas Farmers Market, where ManoRun has sold produce on a weekly basis for several years. Assuming they remain essential services, Krucker wonders whether social distancing measures will keep customers away from the open-air markets.

In the short term, ManoRun is reinventing its business operations to feed customers’ desires for local food.

“Our message to the community is, ‘We’re there. We’d like you to be there too,’” said Krucker.

In previous years, ManoRun used to offer a market-style service, where customers could come to the farm and pick up what they wanted.

This season, members will be asked to place online orders in advance. Farm staff will then prepare the weekly harvest baskets for curbside pickup. A home delivery option will also be available.

ManoRun offers a small market store and is adhering to social distancing by allowing just one customer at a time to enter.

Krucker and partner Denise Trigatti are investing in the business by building a market stand at the end of their Highway 52 laneway.

Krucker hopes to have his “farmgate” sales open by mid-May, to attract some potential customers along the often busy thoroughfare.

“People drive up your laneway,” said Krucker. “When people see a stand that’s visible from the road, they’re much more likely to stop.”

Overall, Krucker is hopeful small farms with retail components will continue to be considered essential. He’s heartened by the apparent trend toward local food.

“I’m thinking of it as a positive,” said Krucker. “But we really don’t know what’s going to create greater restrictions.”

During the growing season, from May to October, ManoRun welcomes farm staff called interns who look after the physically demanding planting, harvesting and general chores. Interns — who also live on the farm — will be asked to follow physical distancing guidelines before they arrive and once they begin working. ManoRun doesn’t use seasonal agricultural workers from overseas — only workers from within Ontario — so there’s no need for quarantines, Krucker noted.

Copetown's ManoRun Organic Farm ready to feed appetite for local food during coronavirus pandemic

Booming demand for #homegrown produce

News Apr 28, 2020 by Mike Pearson Ancaster News

Chris Krucker of ManoRun Organic Farm hopes a growing demand for locally sourced food will help guide his Copetown farm through the coronavirus pandemic.

ManoRun operates under a community supported agriculture model, whereby members purchase seasonal shares in exchange for a weekly harvest basket of fresh produce.

While the growing season is still a few weeks away, ManoRun has already sold out its allotted 150 farm shares and has started a wait list for additional members.

That’s the good news.

Related Content

The bad news is the farm’s restaurant sales have completely dried up, as dining rooms across the province are shuttered. There’s also some uncertainty over farmers markets, including the Dundas Farmers Market, where ManoRun has sold produce on a weekly basis for several years. Assuming they remain essential services, Krucker wonders whether social distancing measures will keep customers away from the open-air markets.

In the short term, ManoRun is reinventing its business operations to feed customers’ desires for local food.

“Our message to the community is, ‘We’re there. We’d like you to be there too,’” said Krucker.

In previous years, ManoRun used to offer a market-style service, where customers could come to the farm and pick up what they wanted.

This season, members will be asked to place online orders in advance. Farm staff will then prepare the weekly harvest baskets for curbside pickup. A home delivery option will also be available.

ManoRun offers a small market store and is adhering to social distancing by allowing just one customer at a time to enter.

Krucker and partner Denise Trigatti are investing in the business by building a market stand at the end of their Highway 52 laneway.

Krucker hopes to have his “farmgate” sales open by mid-May, to attract some potential customers along the often busy thoroughfare.

“People drive up your laneway,” said Krucker. “When people see a stand that’s visible from the road, they’re much more likely to stop.”

Overall, Krucker is hopeful small farms with retail components will continue to be considered essential. He’s heartened by the apparent trend toward local food.

“I’m thinking of it as a positive,” said Krucker. “But we really don’t know what’s going to create greater restrictions.”

During the growing season, from May to October, ManoRun welcomes farm staff called interns who look after the physically demanding planting, harvesting and general chores. Interns — who also live on the farm — will be asked to follow physical distancing guidelines before they arrive and once they begin working. ManoRun doesn’t use seasonal agricultural workers from overseas — only workers from within Ontario — so there’s no need for quarantines, Krucker noted.

Copetown's ManoRun Organic Farm ready to feed appetite for local food during coronavirus pandemic

Booming demand for #homegrown produce

News Apr 28, 2020 by Mike Pearson Ancaster News

Chris Krucker of ManoRun Organic Farm hopes a growing demand for locally sourced food will help guide his Copetown farm through the coronavirus pandemic.

ManoRun operates under a community supported agriculture model, whereby members purchase seasonal shares in exchange for a weekly harvest basket of fresh produce.

While the growing season is still a few weeks away, ManoRun has already sold out its allotted 150 farm shares and has started a wait list for additional members.

That’s the good news.

Related Content

The bad news is the farm’s restaurant sales have completely dried up, as dining rooms across the province are shuttered. There’s also some uncertainty over farmers markets, including the Dundas Farmers Market, where ManoRun has sold produce on a weekly basis for several years. Assuming they remain essential services, Krucker wonders whether social distancing measures will keep customers away from the open-air markets.

In the short term, ManoRun is reinventing its business operations to feed customers’ desires for local food.

“Our message to the community is, ‘We’re there. We’d like you to be there too,’” said Krucker.

In previous years, ManoRun used to offer a market-style service, where customers could come to the farm and pick up what they wanted.

This season, members will be asked to place online orders in advance. Farm staff will then prepare the weekly harvest baskets for curbside pickup. A home delivery option will also be available.

ManoRun offers a small market store and is adhering to social distancing by allowing just one customer at a time to enter.

Krucker and partner Denise Trigatti are investing in the business by building a market stand at the end of their Highway 52 laneway.

Krucker hopes to have his “farmgate” sales open by mid-May, to attract some potential customers along the often busy thoroughfare.

“People drive up your laneway,” said Krucker. “When people see a stand that’s visible from the road, they’re much more likely to stop.”

Overall, Krucker is hopeful small farms with retail components will continue to be considered essential. He’s heartened by the apparent trend toward local food.

“I’m thinking of it as a positive,” said Krucker. “But we really don’t know what’s going to create greater restrictions.”

During the growing season, from May to October, ManoRun welcomes farm staff called interns who look after the physically demanding planting, harvesting and general chores. Interns — who also live on the farm — will be asked to follow physical distancing guidelines before they arrive and once they begin working. ManoRun doesn’t use seasonal agricultural workers from overseas — only workers from within Ontario — so there’s no need for quarantines, Krucker noted.