Hamilton's suburban homeowners see lower tax increase compared to urban homeowners

News Apr 28, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton’s downtown residents are feeling the tax heat as they will continue to pay higher property taxes than their suburban and rural counterparts in 2020.

City finance staff say the differences in tax increases vary across the city because of whether residents pay for transit, parkland purchases and due to property reassessments. Downtown properties have been seeing higher values through sales over the last few years.

Even though the average tax increase will be 2.9 per cent, wards 1 and 3 residents will see their taxes jump 4.1 per cent, meaning on average an additional $191 and $103 to their property tax bills, respectively. Right behind them are Ward 2 residents at 3.7 per cent or $120 and Ward 4 residents, who will get hit with a 3.1 per cent increase or an extra $83.

Residents on the Mountain saw their property taxes increase about in line with the city's average: Ward 6 at 2.6 per cent or an average of $99; Ward 7 2.9 per cent or an average of $114; Ward 8 with a 2.8 per cent increase, or an average of $121 put on the tax bill; and Ward 14 with a 2.8 per cent increase or an average of $129.

In Stoney Creek, Ward 9 residents saw a 2.5 per cent hike or an extra $106, while Ward 10 residents will absorb a 2.6 per cent increase or $119. Ward 5 will see a 2.5 per cent hike or an average of an extra $92 in taxes.

Ancaster residents will have to pay an average tax increase of 2.6 per cent or $147, while Dundas and rural Flamborough residents will have a 2.4 per cent hike, or $121. Ancaster residents have a higher tax increase after paying for the arts centre construction and transit costs.

For Ward 15 residents, concentrated in the Waterdown area, the increase is 2.2 per cent or $126.

Glanbrook residents living in Ward 11 had the lowest tax hike among all wards at 1.9 per cent or an extra $89.

Finance staff said changes to the area-rating cost for transit and lower than average reassessment impacts have lowered taxes for wards 11, 12 and 13.

 

Hamilton's suburban residents to see lower tax increases compared to urban property owners

News Apr 28, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton’s downtown residents are feeling the tax heat as they will continue to pay higher property taxes than their suburban and rural counterparts in 2020.

City finance staff say the differences in tax increases vary across the city because of whether residents pay for transit, parkland purchases and due to property reassessments. Downtown properties have been seeing higher values through sales over the last few years.

Even though the average tax increase will be 2.9 per cent, wards 1 and 3 residents will see their taxes jump 4.1 per cent, meaning on average an additional $191 and $103 to their property tax bills, respectively. Right behind them are Ward 2 residents at 3.7 per cent or $120 and Ward 4 residents, who will get hit with a 3.1 per cent increase or an extra $83.

Residents on the Mountain saw their property taxes increase about in line with the city's average: Ward 6 at 2.6 per cent or an average of $99; Ward 7 2.9 per cent or an average of $114; Ward 8 with a 2.8 per cent increase, or an average of $121 put on the tax bill; and Ward 14 with a 2.8 per cent increase or an average of $129.

In Stoney Creek, Ward 9 residents saw a 2.5 per cent hike or an extra $106, while Ward 10 residents will absorb a 2.6 per cent increase or $119. Ward 5 will see a 2.5 per cent hike or an average of an extra $92 in taxes.

Ancaster residents will have to pay an average tax increase of 2.6 per cent or $147, while Dundas and rural Flamborough residents will have a 2.4 per cent hike, or $121. Ancaster residents have a higher tax increase after paying for the arts centre construction and transit costs.

For Ward 15 residents, concentrated in the Waterdown area, the increase is 2.2 per cent or $126.

Glanbrook residents living in Ward 11 had the lowest tax hike among all wards at 1.9 per cent or an extra $89.

Finance staff said changes to the area-rating cost for transit and lower than average reassessment impacts have lowered taxes for wards 11, 12 and 13.

 

Hamilton's suburban residents to see lower tax increases compared to urban property owners

News Apr 28, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton’s downtown residents are feeling the tax heat as they will continue to pay higher property taxes than their suburban and rural counterparts in 2020.

City finance staff say the differences in tax increases vary across the city because of whether residents pay for transit, parkland purchases and due to property reassessments. Downtown properties have been seeing higher values through sales over the last few years.

Even though the average tax increase will be 2.9 per cent, wards 1 and 3 residents will see their taxes jump 4.1 per cent, meaning on average an additional $191 and $103 to their property tax bills, respectively. Right behind them are Ward 2 residents at 3.7 per cent or $120 and Ward 4 residents, who will get hit with a 3.1 per cent increase or an extra $83.

Residents on the Mountain saw their property taxes increase about in line with the city's average: Ward 6 at 2.6 per cent or an average of $99; Ward 7 2.9 per cent or an average of $114; Ward 8 with a 2.8 per cent increase, or an average of $121 put on the tax bill; and Ward 14 with a 2.8 per cent increase or an average of $129.

In Stoney Creek, Ward 9 residents saw a 2.5 per cent hike or an extra $106, while Ward 10 residents will absorb a 2.6 per cent increase or $119. Ward 5 will see a 2.5 per cent hike or an average of an extra $92 in taxes.

Ancaster residents will have to pay an average tax increase of 2.6 per cent or $147, while Dundas and rural Flamborough residents will have a 2.4 per cent hike, or $121. Ancaster residents have a higher tax increase after paying for the arts centre construction and transit costs.

For Ward 15 residents, concentrated in the Waterdown area, the increase is 2.2 per cent or $126.

Glanbrook residents living in Ward 11 had the lowest tax hike among all wards at 1.9 per cent or an extra $89.

Finance staff said changes to the area-rating cost for transit and lower than average reassessment impacts have lowered taxes for wards 11, 12 and 13.