Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger urges residents to follow coronavirus guidelines

News Apr 21, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton officials are urging residents to keep following the strict emergency measures imposed by the city and province even though Ontario coronavirus modelling data reveals peak cases for community spread appear to be declining.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger said April 20 that despite the positive news, residents need to continue to stay home and maintain physical distancing measures.

“It doesn’t mean we are finished, or we need to let up,” said Eisenberger. “We are on the right path. (Public health officials) are indicating the emergency measures remain in place.”

Emergency Operations Centre Director Paul Johnson said despite the “optimism” about the declining cases, there is no plan to ease local restrictions on public gatherings.

“The EOC has no plans to open up additional amenities any time soon,” said Johnson. “Stay at home. This is the kind of thing that is working.”

Hamilton is committed to keeping its publicly owned facilities closed until May 25. The province extended the state of emergency until mid-May.

Eisenberger has been resisting requests from residents and the business community to develop a plan to reopen the local economy and ease physical distancing measures.

“No, I have not formulated a plan,” he said recently during a Hamilton Chamber of Commerce virtual forum. “That will come out of public health recommendations. These are going to be determined by what level of the virus is still out there.”

Despite the positive data, provincial officials said the community spread of coronavirus in long-term care homes, retirement homes and any other congregate settings continues to rise.

On April 3, the province revealed coronavirus projections that predicted 80,000 cases and just under 1,600 deaths in Ontario by the end of April if current precautions are upheld. The province is nowhere near those numbers.

Now the cumulative cases for the span of the outbreak is less than 20,000, “substantially lower” than up to 6,000 deaths and 300,000 cases suggested for the end of April if no safety measures were taken.

As of April 21, the total number of cases in the province stands at 11,735, including 622 deaths and 5,806 recoveries.

In Hamilton, there are 331 total cases, with 324 confirmed cases and seven probable. There are now 16 deaths connected to the coronavirus with five deaths since the weekend. Six of the fatalities are connected to the outbreak at Cardinal Retirement Residence, with another four linked to Heritage Green Nursing Home in Stoney Creek.

Health officials said while earlier models predicted a peak in cases in May, crackdowns on public gatherings and other interventions had accelerated the peak to late April.

The data also revealed Ontario is now waging the pandemic fight on two fronts — community spread, which appears to have peaked and is being brought under control, and the spread through long-term care facilities.

Dr. Bart Harvey, associate medical officer of health, acknowledged the virus in long-term care facilities is “an issue” in the city. He said public health officials are working closely with the sector and have conducted what he termed "not-stop" testing of staff and residents at four LTC sites over the past few days.

“The primary objective here is to decrease the risk of the virus to be transmitted,” he said.

Hamilton to keep coronavirus pandemic restrictions in place despite improving virus data

News Apr 21, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton officials are urging residents to keep following the strict emergency measures imposed by the city and province even though Ontario coronavirus modelling data reveals peak cases for community spread appear to be declining.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger said April 20 that despite the positive news, residents need to continue to stay home and maintain physical distancing measures.

“It doesn’t mean we are finished, or we need to let up,” said Eisenberger. “We are on the right path. (Public health officials) are indicating the emergency measures remain in place.”

Emergency Operations Centre Director Paul Johnson said despite the “optimism” about the declining cases, there is no plan to ease local restrictions on public gatherings.

Related Content

“The EOC has no plans to open up additional amenities any time soon,” said Johnson. “Stay at home. This is the kind of thing that is working.”

Hamilton is committed to keeping its publicly owned facilities closed until May 25. The province extended the state of emergency until mid-May.

Eisenberger has been resisting requests from residents and the business community to develop a plan to reopen the local economy and ease physical distancing measures.

“No, I have not formulated a plan,” he said recently during a Hamilton Chamber of Commerce virtual forum. “That will come out of public health recommendations. These are going to be determined by what level of the virus is still out there.”

Despite the positive data, provincial officials said the community spread of coronavirus in long-term care homes, retirement homes and any other congregate settings continues to rise.

On April 3, the province revealed coronavirus projections that predicted 80,000 cases and just under 1,600 deaths in Ontario by the end of April if current precautions are upheld. The province is nowhere near those numbers.

Now the cumulative cases for the span of the outbreak is less than 20,000, “substantially lower” than up to 6,000 deaths and 300,000 cases suggested for the end of April if no safety measures were taken.

As of April 21, the total number of cases in the province stands at 11,735, including 622 deaths and 5,806 recoveries.

In Hamilton, there are 331 total cases, with 324 confirmed cases and seven probable. There are now 16 deaths connected to the coronavirus with five deaths since the weekend. Six of the fatalities are connected to the outbreak at Cardinal Retirement Residence, with another four linked to Heritage Green Nursing Home in Stoney Creek.

Health officials said while earlier models predicted a peak in cases in May, crackdowns on public gatherings and other interventions had accelerated the peak to late April.

The data also revealed Ontario is now waging the pandemic fight on two fronts — community spread, which appears to have peaked and is being brought under control, and the spread through long-term care facilities.

Dr. Bart Harvey, associate medical officer of health, acknowledged the virus in long-term care facilities is “an issue” in the city. He said public health officials are working closely with the sector and have conducted what he termed "not-stop" testing of staff and residents at four LTC sites over the past few days.

“The primary objective here is to decrease the risk of the virus to be transmitted,” he said.

Hamilton to keep coronavirus pandemic restrictions in place despite improving virus data

News Apr 21, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton officials are urging residents to keep following the strict emergency measures imposed by the city and province even though Ontario coronavirus modelling data reveals peak cases for community spread appear to be declining.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger said April 20 that despite the positive news, residents need to continue to stay home and maintain physical distancing measures.

“It doesn’t mean we are finished, or we need to let up,” said Eisenberger. “We are on the right path. (Public health officials) are indicating the emergency measures remain in place.”

Emergency Operations Centre Director Paul Johnson said despite the “optimism” about the declining cases, there is no plan to ease local restrictions on public gatherings.

Related Content

“The EOC has no plans to open up additional amenities any time soon,” said Johnson. “Stay at home. This is the kind of thing that is working.”

Hamilton is committed to keeping its publicly owned facilities closed until May 25. The province extended the state of emergency until mid-May.

Eisenberger has been resisting requests from residents and the business community to develop a plan to reopen the local economy and ease physical distancing measures.

“No, I have not formulated a plan,” he said recently during a Hamilton Chamber of Commerce virtual forum. “That will come out of public health recommendations. These are going to be determined by what level of the virus is still out there.”

Despite the positive data, provincial officials said the community spread of coronavirus in long-term care homes, retirement homes and any other congregate settings continues to rise.

On April 3, the province revealed coronavirus projections that predicted 80,000 cases and just under 1,600 deaths in Ontario by the end of April if current precautions are upheld. The province is nowhere near those numbers.

Now the cumulative cases for the span of the outbreak is less than 20,000, “substantially lower” than up to 6,000 deaths and 300,000 cases suggested for the end of April if no safety measures were taken.

As of April 21, the total number of cases in the province stands at 11,735, including 622 deaths and 5,806 recoveries.

In Hamilton, there are 331 total cases, with 324 confirmed cases and seven probable. There are now 16 deaths connected to the coronavirus with five deaths since the weekend. Six of the fatalities are connected to the outbreak at Cardinal Retirement Residence, with another four linked to Heritage Green Nursing Home in Stoney Creek.

Health officials said while earlier models predicted a peak in cases in May, crackdowns on public gatherings and other interventions had accelerated the peak to late April.

The data also revealed Ontario is now waging the pandemic fight on two fronts — community spread, which appears to have peaked and is being brought under control, and the spread through long-term care facilities.

Dr. Bart Harvey, associate medical officer of health, acknowledged the virus in long-term care facilities is “an issue” in the city. He said public health officials are working closely with the sector and have conducted what he termed "not-stop" testing of staff and residents at four LTC sites over the past few days.

“The primary objective here is to decrease the risk of the virus to be transmitted,” he said.