Hamilton's AVL Manufacturing turning shipping containers into mobile triage units to assist coronavirus pandemic

News Apr 16, 2020 by Mike Pearson Hamilton Mountain News

A Hamilton firm is turning shipping containers into mobile triage modules for front-line health-care workers battling the coronavirus pandemic.

Vince DiCristofaro, CEO of AVL Manufacturing, is working with Mitacs researcher Ramtin Rasoulinezhad on the mobile modules, billed as alternatives to conventional triage tents.

Using repurposed 40-foot shipping containers, the modules will have self-contained heating and cooling systems, on-board power generation, hepa filtration, walls bolstered with reinforced fibreglass panels and a large window.

The standard layout includes space for six hospital beds, plus ventilators and other equipment. Units can be easily shipped by land, air or sea.

The mobile triage units cost $75,000 U.S. (roughly $100,000 Canadian) and come ready to use at the push of a button, with no on-site assembly required. Electricity is provided by a diesel generator and the units can also connect to a power grid.

DiCristofaro was inspired by his wife – a health-care worker – to come up with an alternative to conventional triage tents which he said can be cold and difficult to sanitize.

“I want to provide the front-line worker with a more adequate way of responding, other than in a tent,” said DiCristofaro.

AVL builds outdoor power and energy enclosure systems for clients across North America. It has two Hamilton facilities on Queen Street and Sherman Avenue that collectively house 130,000 square feet of manufacturing space.

DiCristofaro has been in contact with health officials around the globe, including the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in New York, several other U.S. states, provinces like Quebec and Alberta and officials as far away as Europe and Africa.

The Ontario government is aware of AVL's efforts as well. Ontario Minister of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade Vic Fedeli specifically mentioned AVL Manufacturing's mobile triage modules during an interview on CH News' April 16 newscast. Fedeli was responding to a question about firms in the Hamilton, Halton and Niagara areas working to provide personal protective equipment and resources in the fight against COVID-19.

The mobile modules could be placed in hospital parking lots or used as screening areas for staff and visitors at long-term care and retirement homes, DiCristofaro said.

He said staff and researchers are fast-tracking the engineering process and noted AVL’s typical sales cycle is longer than two weeks.

DiCristofaro said the modules could prove valuable to health-care agencies well into the future, even as governments manage to flatten the curve of new COVID-19 infections.

“This is not going to go away,” DiCristofaro said, referencing a possible second wave of coronavirus cases. “This will raise its head again.”

Development of the mobile modules has been supported and funded by Mitacs, a not-for-profit organization that harnesses the expertise of Canadian academic institutions to spur industrial innovation.

Mitacs recently announced a new initiative to help small and medium-sized enterprises expedite coronavirus-related projects by securing government funding, accessing resources for research, development and equipment, and hiring post-secondary interns.

“Our team is committed to supporting the development of innovative solutions for Canada and the world,” said John Hepburn, Mitacs CEO and scientific director in a news release. “In response to federal and provincial government announcements of funding for coronavirus research, our 80 business development experts nationwide are poised to guide (small and medium enterprises) through the process and give them access to the talent and tools needed to succeed.”

Hamilton's AVL Manufacturing turning shipping containers into mobile triage units to assist coronavirus pandemic

Effort backed by funding, support from Mitacs

News Apr 16, 2020 by Mike Pearson Hamilton Mountain News

A Hamilton firm is turning shipping containers into mobile triage modules for front-line health-care workers battling the coronavirus pandemic.

Vince DiCristofaro, CEO of AVL Manufacturing, is working with Mitacs researcher Ramtin Rasoulinezhad on the mobile modules, billed as alternatives to conventional triage tents.

Using repurposed 40-foot shipping containers, the modules will have self-contained heating and cooling systems, on-board power generation, hepa filtration, walls bolstered with reinforced fibreglass panels and a large window.

The standard layout includes space for six hospital beds, plus ventilators and other equipment. Units can be easily shipped by land, air or sea.

The mobile triage units cost $75,000 U.S. (roughly $100,000 Canadian) and come ready to use at the push of a button, with no on-site assembly required. Electricity is provided by a diesel generator and the units can also connect to a power grid.

DiCristofaro was inspired by his wife – a health-care worker – to come up with an alternative to conventional triage tents which he said can be cold and difficult to sanitize.

“I want to provide the front-line worker with a more adequate way of responding, other than in a tent,” said DiCristofaro.

AVL builds outdoor power and energy enclosure systems for clients across North America. It has two Hamilton facilities on Queen Street and Sherman Avenue that collectively house 130,000 square feet of manufacturing space.

DiCristofaro has been in contact with health officials around the globe, including the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in New York, several other U.S. states, provinces like Quebec and Alberta and officials as far away as Europe and Africa.

The Ontario government is aware of AVL's efforts as well. Ontario Minister of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade Vic Fedeli specifically mentioned AVL Manufacturing's mobile triage modules during an interview on CH News' April 16 newscast. Fedeli was responding to a question about firms in the Hamilton, Halton and Niagara areas working to provide personal protective equipment and resources in the fight against COVID-19.

The mobile modules could be placed in hospital parking lots or used as screening areas for staff and visitors at long-term care and retirement homes, DiCristofaro said.

He said staff and researchers are fast-tracking the engineering process and noted AVL’s typical sales cycle is longer than two weeks.

DiCristofaro said the modules could prove valuable to health-care agencies well into the future, even as governments manage to flatten the curve of new COVID-19 infections.

“This is not going to go away,” DiCristofaro said, referencing a possible second wave of coronavirus cases. “This will raise its head again.”

Development of the mobile modules has been supported and funded by Mitacs, a not-for-profit organization that harnesses the expertise of Canadian academic institutions to spur industrial innovation.

Mitacs recently announced a new initiative to help small and medium-sized enterprises expedite coronavirus-related projects by securing government funding, accessing resources for research, development and equipment, and hiring post-secondary interns.

“Our team is committed to supporting the development of innovative solutions for Canada and the world,” said John Hepburn, Mitacs CEO and scientific director in a news release. “In response to federal and provincial government announcements of funding for coronavirus research, our 80 business development experts nationwide are poised to guide (small and medium enterprises) through the process and give them access to the talent and tools needed to succeed.”

Hamilton's AVL Manufacturing turning shipping containers into mobile triage units to assist coronavirus pandemic

Effort backed by funding, support from Mitacs

News Apr 16, 2020 by Mike Pearson Hamilton Mountain News

A Hamilton firm is turning shipping containers into mobile triage modules for front-line health-care workers battling the coronavirus pandemic.

Vince DiCristofaro, CEO of AVL Manufacturing, is working with Mitacs researcher Ramtin Rasoulinezhad on the mobile modules, billed as alternatives to conventional triage tents.

Using repurposed 40-foot shipping containers, the modules will have self-contained heating and cooling systems, on-board power generation, hepa filtration, walls bolstered with reinforced fibreglass panels and a large window.

The standard layout includes space for six hospital beds, plus ventilators and other equipment. Units can be easily shipped by land, air or sea.

The mobile triage units cost $75,000 U.S. (roughly $100,000 Canadian) and come ready to use at the push of a button, with no on-site assembly required. Electricity is provided by a diesel generator and the units can also connect to a power grid.

DiCristofaro was inspired by his wife – a health-care worker – to come up with an alternative to conventional triage tents which he said can be cold and difficult to sanitize.

“I want to provide the front-line worker with a more adequate way of responding, other than in a tent,” said DiCristofaro.

AVL builds outdoor power and energy enclosure systems for clients across North America. It has two Hamilton facilities on Queen Street and Sherman Avenue that collectively house 130,000 square feet of manufacturing space.

DiCristofaro has been in contact with health officials around the globe, including the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in New York, several other U.S. states, provinces like Quebec and Alberta and officials as far away as Europe and Africa.

The Ontario government is aware of AVL's efforts as well. Ontario Minister of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade Vic Fedeli specifically mentioned AVL Manufacturing's mobile triage modules during an interview on CH News' April 16 newscast. Fedeli was responding to a question about firms in the Hamilton, Halton and Niagara areas working to provide personal protective equipment and resources in the fight against COVID-19.

The mobile modules could be placed in hospital parking lots or used as screening areas for staff and visitors at long-term care and retirement homes, DiCristofaro said.

He said staff and researchers are fast-tracking the engineering process and noted AVL’s typical sales cycle is longer than two weeks.

DiCristofaro said the modules could prove valuable to health-care agencies well into the future, even as governments manage to flatten the curve of new COVID-19 infections.

“This is not going to go away,” DiCristofaro said, referencing a possible second wave of coronavirus cases. “This will raise its head again.”

Development of the mobile modules has been supported and funded by Mitacs, a not-for-profit organization that harnesses the expertise of Canadian academic institutions to spur industrial innovation.

Mitacs recently announced a new initiative to help small and medium-sized enterprises expedite coronavirus-related projects by securing government funding, accessing resources for research, development and equipment, and hiring post-secondary interns.

“Our team is committed to supporting the development of innovative solutions for Canada and the world,” said John Hepburn, Mitacs CEO and scientific director in a news release. “In response to federal and provincial government announcements of funding for coronavirus research, our 80 business development experts nationwide are poised to guide (small and medium enterprises) through the process and give them access to the talent and tools needed to succeed.”