Hamilton stops about 130 capital projects because of the coronavirus pandemic

News Apr 16, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton has either delayed or will not start almost 130 capital projects, characterizing them as non-essential because of the coronavirus pandemic.

A few of those projects include: the Ancaster Arts Centre; the Dundas Lawn Bowling roof repair; the former Stoney Creek City Hall improvements; Hamilton City Hall renovations; the Greensville Library/community centre; and Beverly Community Centre new construction.

Other projects that have either been halted or will not start include: roof repairs on Macassa and Wentworth lodges; the Valley Park recreation centre improvements and library expansion; Mohawk Beach Sports Park and Confederation Beach Park expansion; the William Connell remediation of the stormwater pond; road work at Mud Street from Paramount to Upper Centennial; the North Service Road improvements from Centennial to Drakes; the Dundas Street resurfacing; the Beach Boulevard resurfacing; the Pier 8 Gateway Park; and the Pier 5 to 7 shoreline work.

Public works staff, in a list sent to all councillors April 14, concluded that 91 capital projects were calculated to be essential and needed to proceed.

These projects include: the Airport Employment Growth District infrastructure projects on Twenty Road, English Church and Osler Drive; the Hamilton Police forensic building; Hamilton Convention Centre façade improvement; drilling work at Hamilton Housing property at 55 Queenston Road; Highway 8 reconstruction; Roxborough Avenue reconstruction; and Ferguson Avenue reconstruction.

Other projects identified as essential include: utility installations across the city; Burlington Street trunk water main; Claremont Access road resurfacing; the Woodward Avenue project, including biofilter and chlorine evaporator replacements; and the paving of the Lincoln Alexander Parkway, Red Hill Valley Parkway and the Mud Street ramp.

There were three projects that were identified as essential, but were not proceeding, including the Victoria Street Two-way conversion; the Hunter Street cycle track; and sidewalk replacements across the city.

Public Works General Manager Dan McKinnon said staff used provincial criteria as well as the city’s own rules to determine how to deal with the estimated 222 capital projects the city had started when the coronavirus pandemic hit the city.

He said some of the projects are moving forward because they would create an immediate danger to life, health and safety if they were stopped; if the city would be in noncompliance if the projects were not completed; if a project was stopped that would have a “serious environmental damage” to the community; or if there was a funding risk if the project was halted.

“In a general way, we have likely been more cautious than the provincial guidelines dictated,” he said.

The province issued orders April 8 that allowed only essential construction, including health-care projects, infrastructure critical to increasing capacity and improve safety; petrochemical and refinery projects; and residential construction projects if the permits have been granted or if they involve renovation work.

McKinnon said he will discuss with finance officials the budget implications for halting some of the capital projects.

 

Hamilton stops about 130 capital projects because of the coronavirus pandemic

Ancaster Arts Centre, Valley Park Arena are capital projects that have been stopped because of pandemic

News Apr 16, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton has either delayed or will not start almost 130 capital projects, characterizing them as non-essential because of the coronavirus pandemic.

A few of those projects include: the Ancaster Arts Centre; the Dundas Lawn Bowling roof repair; the former Stoney Creek City Hall improvements; Hamilton City Hall renovations; the Greensville Library/community centre; and Beverly Community Centre new construction.

Other projects that have either been halted or will not start include: roof repairs on Macassa and Wentworth lodges; the Valley Park recreation centre improvements and library expansion; Mohawk Beach Sports Park and Confederation Beach Park expansion; the William Connell remediation of the stormwater pond; road work at Mud Street from Paramount to Upper Centennial; the North Service Road improvements from Centennial to Drakes; the Dundas Street resurfacing; the Beach Boulevard resurfacing; the Pier 8 Gateway Park; and the Pier 5 to 7 shoreline work.

Related Content

Public works staff, in a list sent to all councillors April 14, concluded that 91 capital projects were calculated to be essential and needed to proceed.

These projects include: the Airport Employment Growth District infrastructure projects on Twenty Road, English Church and Osler Drive; the Hamilton Police forensic building; Hamilton Convention Centre façade improvement; drilling work at Hamilton Housing property at 55 Queenston Road; Highway 8 reconstruction; Roxborough Avenue reconstruction; and Ferguson Avenue reconstruction.

Other projects identified as essential include: utility installations across the city; Burlington Street trunk water main; Claremont Access road resurfacing; the Woodward Avenue project, including biofilter and chlorine evaporator replacements; and the paving of the Lincoln Alexander Parkway, Red Hill Valley Parkway and the Mud Street ramp.

There were three projects that were identified as essential, but were not proceeding, including the Victoria Street Two-way conversion; the Hunter Street cycle track; and sidewalk replacements across the city.

Public Works General Manager Dan McKinnon said staff used provincial criteria as well as the city’s own rules to determine how to deal with the estimated 222 capital projects the city had started when the coronavirus pandemic hit the city.

He said some of the projects are moving forward because they would create an immediate danger to life, health and safety if they were stopped; if the city would be in noncompliance if the projects were not completed; if a project was stopped that would have a “serious environmental damage” to the community; or if there was a funding risk if the project was halted.

“In a general way, we have likely been more cautious than the provincial guidelines dictated,” he said.

The province issued orders April 8 that allowed only essential construction, including health-care projects, infrastructure critical to increasing capacity and improve safety; petrochemical and refinery projects; and residential construction projects if the permits have been granted or if they involve renovation work.

McKinnon said he will discuss with finance officials the budget implications for halting some of the capital projects.

 

Hamilton stops about 130 capital projects because of the coronavirus pandemic

Ancaster Arts Centre, Valley Park Arena are capital projects that have been stopped because of pandemic

News Apr 16, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton has either delayed or will not start almost 130 capital projects, characterizing them as non-essential because of the coronavirus pandemic.

A few of those projects include: the Ancaster Arts Centre; the Dundas Lawn Bowling roof repair; the former Stoney Creek City Hall improvements; Hamilton City Hall renovations; the Greensville Library/community centre; and Beverly Community Centre new construction.

Other projects that have either been halted or will not start include: roof repairs on Macassa and Wentworth lodges; the Valley Park recreation centre improvements and library expansion; Mohawk Beach Sports Park and Confederation Beach Park expansion; the William Connell remediation of the stormwater pond; road work at Mud Street from Paramount to Upper Centennial; the North Service Road improvements from Centennial to Drakes; the Dundas Street resurfacing; the Beach Boulevard resurfacing; the Pier 8 Gateway Park; and the Pier 5 to 7 shoreline work.

Related Content

Public works staff, in a list sent to all councillors April 14, concluded that 91 capital projects were calculated to be essential and needed to proceed.

These projects include: the Airport Employment Growth District infrastructure projects on Twenty Road, English Church and Osler Drive; the Hamilton Police forensic building; Hamilton Convention Centre façade improvement; drilling work at Hamilton Housing property at 55 Queenston Road; Highway 8 reconstruction; Roxborough Avenue reconstruction; and Ferguson Avenue reconstruction.

Other projects identified as essential include: utility installations across the city; Burlington Street trunk water main; Claremont Access road resurfacing; the Woodward Avenue project, including biofilter and chlorine evaporator replacements; and the paving of the Lincoln Alexander Parkway, Red Hill Valley Parkway and the Mud Street ramp.

There were three projects that were identified as essential, but were not proceeding, including the Victoria Street Two-way conversion; the Hunter Street cycle track; and sidewalk replacements across the city.

Public Works General Manager Dan McKinnon said staff used provincial criteria as well as the city’s own rules to determine how to deal with the estimated 222 capital projects the city had started when the coronavirus pandemic hit the city.

He said some of the projects are moving forward because they would create an immediate danger to life, health and safety if they were stopped; if the city would be in noncompliance if the projects were not completed; if a project was stopped that would have a “serious environmental damage” to the community; or if there was a funding risk if the project was halted.

“In a general way, we have likely been more cautious than the provincial guidelines dictated,” he said.

The province issued orders April 8 that allowed only essential construction, including health-care projects, infrastructure critical to increasing capacity and improve safety; petrochemical and refinery projects; and residential construction projects if the permits have been granted or if they involve renovation work.

McKinnon said he will discuss with finance officials the budget implications for halting some of the capital projects.