Ancaster's Archmill House Inc. retools to support front-line health-care workers

News Apr 15, 2020 by Mike Pearson Ancaster News

Before the novel coronavirus pandemic, Ancaster’s Archmill House Inc. was busy fabricating architectural millwork products for a variety of commercial clients, like McDonald’s, Starbucks and Tim Hortons.

But when restaurant dining areas across North America shut down in mid-March, the need for self-serve kiosks — a key component of Archmill’s business — evaporated.

Since then, the company has retooled its operations in the Ancaster Business Park to support front-line health-care workers.

“The company mission is to provide solutions to workplaces, so that is what we’re focused on,” said co-owner Calvin Buchan. “We’ve retooled many of our lines to protect front-line staff in the health-care industry.”

Recently, Archmill manufactured temporary hospital beds, acrylic COVID-19 protective barriers and hospital bedside tables. The company recently shipped about 1,200 bedside tables and 300 beds to New York to help health-care workers flatten the curve of infections in their state.

Archmill is also shipping thousands of acrylic shields to protect hospital staff and retail workers. Its biggest Ontario client for acrylic shields so far is the LCBO, which is equipping stores provincewide with the protective barriers. As of April 15, three Ontario hospitals have Archmill’s acrylic shields in place to protect staff in reception and triage areas.

By retooling to focus on essential health-care products, Archmill has managed to minimize layoffs among its workforce of about 130. Staff with the ability to work remotely are working from home.

Buchan said the tight timelines have been challenging, but employees have stepped up by working flexible shifts, including weekends and the Easter holidays. The company is disinfecting commonly touched surfaces twice per shift and conducting temperature checks of staff before they enter the building. Staff members are wearing masks and maintaining physical distancing when possible.

Buchan said a devastating 2009 fire gave the company some valuable experience in resiliency. Despite the total destruction of the company’s manufacturing plant, staff were back working at replacement facilities within six days. Since then, the company has rebuilt and expanded its operations. Over the last decade, Archmill replaced its former 35,000 square-foot plant with facilities that collectively measure close to 100,000 square feet.

“We’ve got a very innovative and energetic team,” said Buchan. “But we’ve always felt that responsibility to our employees.”

Ancaster's Archmill House Inc. retools to support front-line health-care workers

News Apr 15, 2020 by Mike Pearson Ancaster News

Before the novel coronavirus pandemic, Ancaster’s Archmill House Inc. was busy fabricating architectural millwork products for a variety of commercial clients, like McDonald’s, Starbucks and Tim Hortons.

But when restaurant dining areas across North America shut down in mid-March, the need for self-serve kiosks — a key component of Archmill’s business — evaporated.

Since then, the company has retooled its operations in the Ancaster Business Park to support front-line health-care workers.

“The company mission is to provide solutions to workplaces, so that is what we’re focused on,” said co-owner Calvin Buchan. “We’ve retooled many of our lines to protect front-line staff in the health-care industry.”

Related Content

Recently, Archmill manufactured temporary hospital beds, acrylic COVID-19 protective barriers and hospital bedside tables. The company recently shipped about 1,200 bedside tables and 300 beds to New York to help health-care workers flatten the curve of infections in their state.

Archmill is also shipping thousands of acrylic shields to protect hospital staff and retail workers. Its biggest Ontario client for acrylic shields so far is the LCBO, which is equipping stores provincewide with the protective barriers. As of April 15, three Ontario hospitals have Archmill’s acrylic shields in place to protect staff in reception and triage areas.

By retooling to focus on essential health-care products, Archmill has managed to minimize layoffs among its workforce of about 130. Staff with the ability to work remotely are working from home.

Buchan said the tight timelines have been challenging, but employees have stepped up by working flexible shifts, including weekends and the Easter holidays. The company is disinfecting commonly touched surfaces twice per shift and conducting temperature checks of staff before they enter the building. Staff members are wearing masks and maintaining physical distancing when possible.

Buchan said a devastating 2009 fire gave the company some valuable experience in resiliency. Despite the total destruction of the company’s manufacturing plant, staff were back working at replacement facilities within six days. Since then, the company has rebuilt and expanded its operations. Over the last decade, Archmill replaced its former 35,000 square-foot plant with facilities that collectively measure close to 100,000 square feet.

“We’ve got a very innovative and energetic team,” said Buchan. “But we’ve always felt that responsibility to our employees.”

Ancaster's Archmill House Inc. retools to support front-line health-care workers

News Apr 15, 2020 by Mike Pearson Ancaster News

Before the novel coronavirus pandemic, Ancaster’s Archmill House Inc. was busy fabricating architectural millwork products for a variety of commercial clients, like McDonald’s, Starbucks and Tim Hortons.

But when restaurant dining areas across North America shut down in mid-March, the need for self-serve kiosks — a key component of Archmill’s business — evaporated.

Since then, the company has retooled its operations in the Ancaster Business Park to support front-line health-care workers.

“The company mission is to provide solutions to workplaces, so that is what we’re focused on,” said co-owner Calvin Buchan. “We’ve retooled many of our lines to protect front-line staff in the health-care industry.”

Related Content

Recently, Archmill manufactured temporary hospital beds, acrylic COVID-19 protective barriers and hospital bedside tables. The company recently shipped about 1,200 bedside tables and 300 beds to New York to help health-care workers flatten the curve of infections in their state.

Archmill is also shipping thousands of acrylic shields to protect hospital staff and retail workers. Its biggest Ontario client for acrylic shields so far is the LCBO, which is equipping stores provincewide with the protective barriers. As of April 15, three Ontario hospitals have Archmill’s acrylic shields in place to protect staff in reception and triage areas.

By retooling to focus on essential health-care products, Archmill has managed to minimize layoffs among its workforce of about 130. Staff with the ability to work remotely are working from home.

Buchan said the tight timelines have been challenging, but employees have stepped up by working flexible shifts, including weekends and the Easter holidays. The company is disinfecting commonly touched surfaces twice per shift and conducting temperature checks of staff before they enter the building. Staff members are wearing masks and maintaining physical distancing when possible.

Buchan said a devastating 2009 fire gave the company some valuable experience in resiliency. Despite the total destruction of the company’s manufacturing plant, staff were back working at replacement facilities within six days. Since then, the company has rebuilt and expanded its operations. Over the last decade, Archmill replaced its former 35,000 square-foot plant with facilities that collectively measure close to 100,000 square feet.

“We’ve got a very innovative and energetic team,” said Buchan. “But we’ve always felt that responsibility to our employees.”