Stoney Creek teacher pushes home-learning limits

News Apr 09, 2020 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Stephanie Bass says she’s tech savvy enough to teach from home, but online learning still has limits, even though she’s enjoying some challenges.

The Grade 6 teacher, at Gatestone public school in upper Stoney Creek, says she misses the face-to-face contact with her 30 students that allows her to pause a lesson when she sees someone isn’t getting a point.

But with the coronavirus outbreak shutting schools, Bass is uploading videotaped lessons to the school board’s online learning platform and communicating with students through a messaging board.

“I’ve come to the conclusion that my job is not one that can be done from a distance,” she says. “This is an emergency situation.”

The Ministry of Education is mandating five hours per week of learning for Grade 6 students, but Bass says she’s providing 25 hours of lessons because some students, especially gifted ones, become bored and want more, while others can’t handle five.

She says she’s been able to find science experiments students can do at home with common materials and upload pictures of their results, allowing online discussion of why they are the same or different.

“Things like that have been very positive, but there’s a limit to how much kids can do because we have to make sure that they have access to those materials.”

Bass says she’s been lucky because her students have digital devices, even if it’s an Xbox or PlayStation that requires help on how to use it for learning.

But she’s also revised a lesson plan on dystopian literature that includes Isaac Asimov’s “The Fun They Had” — about a future where kids don’t go to school anymore and learn everything from a screen at home.

“I haven’t assigned it because it’s a little bit too close to home.”

 

Stoney Creek teacher pushes home-learning limits

#stayathome

News Apr 09, 2020 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Stephanie Bass says she’s tech savvy enough to teach from home, but online learning still has limits, even though she’s enjoying some challenges.

The Grade 6 teacher, at Gatestone public school in upper Stoney Creek, says she misses the face-to-face contact with her 30 students that allows her to pause a lesson when she sees someone isn’t getting a point.

But with the coronavirus outbreak shutting schools, Bass is uploading videotaped lessons to the school board’s online learning platform and communicating with students through a messaging board.

“I’ve come to the conclusion that my job is not one that can be done from a distance,” she says. “This is an emergency situation.”

Related Content

The Ministry of Education is mandating five hours per week of learning for Grade 6 students, but Bass says she’s providing 25 hours of lessons because some students, especially gifted ones, become bored and want more, while others can’t handle five.

She says she’s been able to find science experiments students can do at home with common materials and upload pictures of their results, allowing online discussion of why they are the same or different.

“Things like that have been very positive, but there’s a limit to how much kids can do because we have to make sure that they have access to those materials.”

Bass says she’s been lucky because her students have digital devices, even if it’s an Xbox or PlayStation that requires help on how to use it for learning.

But she’s also revised a lesson plan on dystopian literature that includes Isaac Asimov’s “The Fun They Had” — about a future where kids don’t go to school anymore and learn everything from a screen at home.

“I haven’t assigned it because it’s a little bit too close to home.”

 

Stoney Creek teacher pushes home-learning limits

#stayathome

News Apr 09, 2020 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Stephanie Bass says she’s tech savvy enough to teach from home, but online learning still has limits, even though she’s enjoying some challenges.

The Grade 6 teacher, at Gatestone public school in upper Stoney Creek, says she misses the face-to-face contact with her 30 students that allows her to pause a lesson when she sees someone isn’t getting a point.

But with the coronavirus outbreak shutting schools, Bass is uploading videotaped lessons to the school board’s online learning platform and communicating with students through a messaging board.

“I’ve come to the conclusion that my job is not one that can be done from a distance,” she says. “This is an emergency situation.”

Related Content

The Ministry of Education is mandating five hours per week of learning for Grade 6 students, but Bass says she’s providing 25 hours of lessons because some students, especially gifted ones, become bored and want more, while others can’t handle five.

She says she’s been able to find science experiments students can do at home with common materials and upload pictures of their results, allowing online discussion of why they are the same or different.

“Things like that have been very positive, but there’s a limit to how much kids can do because we have to make sure that they have access to those materials.”

Bass says she’s been lucky because her students have digital devices, even if it’s an Xbox or PlayStation that requires help on how to use it for learning.

But she’s also revised a lesson plan on dystopian literature that includes Isaac Asimov’s “The Fun They Had” — about a future where kids don’t go to school anymore and learn everything from a screen at home.

“I haven’t assigned it because it’s a little bit too close to home.”