Ancaster youth raise over $1K for local food banks

News Apr 06, 2020 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

A group of Ancaster High School students and alumni have taken the initiative to help Hamilton’s most vulnerable during the COVID-19 health crisis.

Soon after the novel coronavirus pandemic put further pressure on Hamilton’s social service agencies, about eight youths launched COVID-19 Response Fundraiser to help local food banks restock their shelves for vulnerable people.

“We wanted, along with helping people, to show that young people can make a difference in a crisis,” said Jotham Ong, 20, an Ancaster High School graduate who is in his third year at the Ivey Business School at Western University.

The fundraising initiative is part of the group’s Operation Poverty initiative that had been created to help educate youth about global poverty. Once the coronavirus pandemic impacted the city, members decided to launch a fundraising appeal to help food banks, said Ong. He said the group hasn’t decided which food bank will receive the money, but they have been talking to Hamilton Food Share officials.

He said 100 per cent of all the funds will be donated to local food banks.

Ong said they raised upwards of $1,000 in more than 72 hours. And already the initiative has received about 285 likes on the Facebook page. Donations can be $10, $50, $100, $500 or $1,000.

“There has been a lot of support offered to us, “said Ong.

Since the pandemic began, there has been a 40 per cent drop in donations for food banks in Ontario. And food banks only have around a 10- to 14-day supply of food. About one million people use food banks across Canada with children and seniors a major portion of the users, say social service officials.

Ong said the COVID-19 fundraising project was an outgrowth of the group’s Operation Poverty — www.operationpoverty.org/donate — created to address the rising global poverty rates and income inequality. The focus of the group is to educate young people about poverty and establish programs to educate and motivate youth to become leaders in their areas to reduce poverty rates. He said the project is to create a conversation about poverty education through case-based interaction.

“By educating students through these initiatives, we hope to inspire our impact schools to take action to reduce poverty today and, in the future,” states the group’s goals.

The group recently released its first poverty case study focusing on Laos. The study highlights “vulnerable households and strategic opportunities for development.”

Ong said when the coronavirus arrived, it was only natural for the youth who are involved in helping to relieve poverty in other countries to do the same in their own back yards.

“We needed to set an example,” he said. “We are very passionate about what we are doing. We wanted to make a difference.”

Ancaster High students and alumni raise over $1K for local food banks

News Apr 06, 2020 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

A group of Ancaster High School students and alumni have taken the initiative to help Hamilton’s most vulnerable during the COVID-19 health crisis.

Soon after the novel coronavirus pandemic put further pressure on Hamilton’s social service agencies, about eight youths launched COVID-19 Response Fundraiser to help local food banks restock their shelves for vulnerable people.

“We wanted, along with helping people, to show that young people can make a difference in a crisis,” said Jotham Ong, 20, an Ancaster High School graduate who is in his third year at the Ivey Business School at Western University.

The fundraising initiative is part of the group’s Operation Poverty initiative that had been created to help educate youth about global poverty. Once the coronavirus pandemic impacted the city, members decided to launch a fundraising appeal to help food banks, said Ong. He said the group hasn’t decided which food bank will receive the money, but they have been talking to Hamilton Food Share officials.

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He said 100 per cent of all the funds will be donated to local food banks.

Ong said they raised upwards of $1,000 in more than 72 hours. And already the initiative has received about 285 likes on the Facebook page. Donations can be $10, $50, $100, $500 or $1,000.

“There has been a lot of support offered to us, “said Ong.

Since the pandemic began, there has been a 40 per cent drop in donations for food banks in Ontario. And food banks only have around a 10- to 14-day supply of food. About one million people use food banks across Canada with children and seniors a major portion of the users, say social service officials.

Ong said the COVID-19 fundraising project was an outgrowth of the group’s Operation Poverty — www.operationpoverty.org/donate — created to address the rising global poverty rates and income inequality. The focus of the group is to educate young people about poverty and establish programs to educate and motivate youth to become leaders in their areas to reduce poverty rates. He said the project is to create a conversation about poverty education through case-based interaction.

“By educating students through these initiatives, we hope to inspire our impact schools to take action to reduce poverty today and, in the future,” states the group’s goals.

The group recently released its first poverty case study focusing on Laos. The study highlights “vulnerable households and strategic opportunities for development.”

Ong said when the coronavirus arrived, it was only natural for the youth who are involved in helping to relieve poverty in other countries to do the same in their own back yards.

“We needed to set an example,” he said. “We are very passionate about what we are doing. We wanted to make a difference.”

Ancaster High students and alumni raise over $1K for local food banks

News Apr 06, 2020 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

A group of Ancaster High School students and alumni have taken the initiative to help Hamilton’s most vulnerable during the COVID-19 health crisis.

Soon after the novel coronavirus pandemic put further pressure on Hamilton’s social service agencies, about eight youths launched COVID-19 Response Fundraiser to help local food banks restock their shelves for vulnerable people.

“We wanted, along with helping people, to show that young people can make a difference in a crisis,” said Jotham Ong, 20, an Ancaster High School graduate who is in his third year at the Ivey Business School at Western University.

The fundraising initiative is part of the group’s Operation Poverty initiative that had been created to help educate youth about global poverty. Once the coronavirus pandemic impacted the city, members decided to launch a fundraising appeal to help food banks, said Ong. He said the group hasn’t decided which food bank will receive the money, but they have been talking to Hamilton Food Share officials.

Related Content

He said 100 per cent of all the funds will be donated to local food banks.

Ong said they raised upwards of $1,000 in more than 72 hours. And already the initiative has received about 285 likes on the Facebook page. Donations can be $10, $50, $100, $500 or $1,000.

“There has been a lot of support offered to us, “said Ong.

Since the pandemic began, there has been a 40 per cent drop in donations for food banks in Ontario. And food banks only have around a 10- to 14-day supply of food. About one million people use food banks across Canada with children and seniors a major portion of the users, say social service officials.

Ong said the COVID-19 fundraising project was an outgrowth of the group’s Operation Poverty — www.operationpoverty.org/donate — created to address the rising global poverty rates and income inequality. The focus of the group is to educate young people about poverty and establish programs to educate and motivate youth to become leaders in their areas to reduce poverty rates. He said the project is to create a conversation about poverty education through case-based interaction.

“By educating students through these initiatives, we hope to inspire our impact schools to take action to reduce poverty today and, in the future,” states the group’s goals.

The group recently released its first poverty case study focusing on Laos. The study highlights “vulnerable households and strategic opportunities for development.”

Ong said when the coronavirus arrived, it was only natural for the youth who are involved in helping to relieve poverty in other countries to do the same in their own back yards.

“We needed to set an example,” he said. “We are very passionate about what we are doing. We wanted to make a difference.”