Hamilton to consider $500 fine for violating physical distancing order

News Apr 04, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton officials are talking tougher when it comes to residents violating bylaws and skirting provincial emergency orders to contain the novel coronavirus pandemic.

City bylaw and police officers have been out in force recently, issuing tickets and laying charges against those ignoring posted signs and barricades at closed facilities.

“This is not a joke,” said Emergency Operations Centre director Paul Johnson during the city’s daily coronavirus update April 3. “There will be more things enforced.”

Johnson highlighted the incident of police issuing $750 tickets to three individuals for golfing on a closed Chedoke Golf Course April 2 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act currently in force to control the spread of coronavirus.

“That is an expensive round of golf,” he said.

Earlier in the week  after the city closed parking lots near public parks, waterfalls and trails  bylaw officers were out issuing tickets ranging from $23 to $76 depending upon when the ticket is paid to people who had illegally parked their vehicles on side streets, gravel or grass areas off roads. Johnson said officers recently had to ticket about 300 vehicles parked near the now-closed Albion Falls.

“Things are pretty much zero tolerance,” he said. “The municipality is sending the message (that) this is serious.”

Johnson said if there are people on the escarpment stairs, which were closed April 1, officials will not simply ask you to leave. He said there will be enforcement.

Councillors will also be reviewing a recommendation at their April 8 virtual council meeting to establish a $500 fine against individuals who are violating the six-foot physical separation area as mandated by public health officials. The City of Brampton approved a bylaw that imposes a minimum fine of $500 and a maximum of $100,000 for violating the physical distancing order.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger said enforcement officials will have the authority to issue the fines against individuals who continually ignore warnings.

“We still hear instances of groups playing in the parks pickup games of football, pickup games of basketball,” said Eisenberger. “All that is contrary to physical separation.”

City staff will also examine how the expanded business closures and shutdown of many construction sites will be handled in Hamilton.

“No one should do anything until connecting to the building (department),” said Johnson. “This doesn’t stop the entire development application process.”

Premier Doug Ford announced all non-essential construction projects will be shelved for 14 days, including new residential projects. Only essential infrastructure-related projects such as for hospitals, transit, and petrochemical will move forward.

The Ontario government also lowered the number of essential workplace categories from 74 to 44.

The stepped-up enforcement comes after Premier Doug Ford and public health officials released coronavirus modelling projections that show there could be up to 15,000 deaths over the next two years. Public health officials said without tougher enforcement of physical distancing measures, there could be 1,600 deaths in April, about two deaths per hour and 80,000 positive cases.

“I’m shocked,” said Eisenberger. “I’m worried and most people are, rightfully so, but we shouldn’t be so worried that we shouldn’t act. We need to step up. Continue to stay home. I’d like to think this community is up (for) the challenge.”

The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Hamilton increased to 138 as of Friday afternoon, almost doubling the 70 confirmed cases at the start of the week.

Hamilton officials talking tougher action needed to halt bylaw violations

News Apr 04, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton officials are talking tougher when it comes to residents violating bylaws and skirting provincial emergency orders to contain the novel coronavirus pandemic.

City bylaw and police officers have been out in force recently, issuing tickets and laying charges against those ignoring posted signs and barricades at closed facilities.

“This is not a joke,” said Emergency Operations Centre director Paul Johnson during the city’s daily coronavirus update April 3. “There will be more things enforced.”

Johnson highlighted the incident of police issuing $750 tickets to three individuals for golfing on a closed Chedoke Golf Course April 2 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act currently in force to control the spread of coronavirus.

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“That is an expensive round of golf,” he said.

Earlier in the week  after the city closed parking lots near public parks, waterfalls and trails  bylaw officers were out issuing tickets ranging from $23 to $76 depending upon when the ticket is paid to people who had illegally parked their vehicles on side streets, gravel or grass areas off roads. Johnson said officers recently had to ticket about 300 vehicles parked near the now-closed Albion Falls.

“Things are pretty much zero tolerance,” he said. “The municipality is sending the message (that) this is serious.”

Johnson said if there are people on the escarpment stairs, which were closed April 1, officials will not simply ask you to leave. He said there will be enforcement.

Councillors will also be reviewing a recommendation at their April 8 virtual council meeting to establish a $500 fine against individuals who are violating the six-foot physical separation area as mandated by public health officials. The City of Brampton approved a bylaw that imposes a minimum fine of $500 and a maximum of $100,000 for violating the physical distancing order.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger said enforcement officials will have the authority to issue the fines against individuals who continually ignore warnings.

“We still hear instances of groups playing in the parks pickup games of football, pickup games of basketball,” said Eisenberger. “All that is contrary to physical separation.”

City staff will also examine how the expanded business closures and shutdown of many construction sites will be handled in Hamilton.

“No one should do anything until connecting to the building (department),” said Johnson. “This doesn’t stop the entire development application process.”

Premier Doug Ford announced all non-essential construction projects will be shelved for 14 days, including new residential projects. Only essential infrastructure-related projects such as for hospitals, transit, and petrochemical will move forward.

The Ontario government also lowered the number of essential workplace categories from 74 to 44.

The stepped-up enforcement comes after Premier Doug Ford and public health officials released coronavirus modelling projections that show there could be up to 15,000 deaths over the next two years. Public health officials said without tougher enforcement of physical distancing measures, there could be 1,600 deaths in April, about two deaths per hour and 80,000 positive cases.

“I’m shocked,” said Eisenberger. “I’m worried and most people are, rightfully so, but we shouldn’t be so worried that we shouldn’t act. We need to step up. Continue to stay home. I’d like to think this community is up (for) the challenge.”

The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Hamilton increased to 138 as of Friday afternoon, almost doubling the 70 confirmed cases at the start of the week.

Hamilton officials talking tougher action needed to halt bylaw violations

News Apr 04, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton officials are talking tougher when it comes to residents violating bylaws and skirting provincial emergency orders to contain the novel coronavirus pandemic.

City bylaw and police officers have been out in force recently, issuing tickets and laying charges against those ignoring posted signs and barricades at closed facilities.

“This is not a joke,” said Emergency Operations Centre director Paul Johnson during the city’s daily coronavirus update April 3. “There will be more things enforced.”

Johnson highlighted the incident of police issuing $750 tickets to three individuals for golfing on a closed Chedoke Golf Course April 2 under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act currently in force to control the spread of coronavirus.

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“That is an expensive round of golf,” he said.

Earlier in the week  after the city closed parking lots near public parks, waterfalls and trails  bylaw officers were out issuing tickets ranging from $23 to $76 depending upon when the ticket is paid to people who had illegally parked their vehicles on side streets, gravel or grass areas off roads. Johnson said officers recently had to ticket about 300 vehicles parked near the now-closed Albion Falls.

“Things are pretty much zero tolerance,” he said. “The municipality is sending the message (that) this is serious.”

Johnson said if there are people on the escarpment stairs, which were closed April 1, officials will not simply ask you to leave. He said there will be enforcement.

Councillors will also be reviewing a recommendation at their April 8 virtual council meeting to establish a $500 fine against individuals who are violating the six-foot physical separation area as mandated by public health officials. The City of Brampton approved a bylaw that imposes a minimum fine of $500 and a maximum of $100,000 for violating the physical distancing order.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger said enforcement officials will have the authority to issue the fines against individuals who continually ignore warnings.

“We still hear instances of groups playing in the parks pickup games of football, pickup games of basketball,” said Eisenberger. “All that is contrary to physical separation.”

City staff will also examine how the expanded business closures and shutdown of many construction sites will be handled in Hamilton.

“No one should do anything until connecting to the building (department),” said Johnson. “This doesn’t stop the entire development application process.”

Premier Doug Ford announced all non-essential construction projects will be shelved for 14 days, including new residential projects. Only essential infrastructure-related projects such as for hospitals, transit, and petrochemical will move forward.

The Ontario government also lowered the number of essential workplace categories from 74 to 44.

The stepped-up enforcement comes after Premier Doug Ford and public health officials released coronavirus modelling projections that show there could be up to 15,000 deaths over the next two years. Public health officials said without tougher enforcement of physical distancing measures, there could be 1,600 deaths in April, about two deaths per hour and 80,000 positive cases.

“I’m shocked,” said Eisenberger. “I’m worried and most people are, rightfully so, but we shouldn’t be so worried that we shouldn’t act. We need to step up. Continue to stay home. I’d like to think this community is up (for) the challenge.”

The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Hamilton increased to 138 as of Friday afternoon, almost doubling the 70 confirmed cases at the start of the week.