Dr. Lita Cameron helping St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton in the fight against coronavirus

News Mar 26, 2020 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

As millions of Canadians retreat to their homes for social and physical distancing in the fight against coronavirus, Dr. Lita Cameron is one of many battling the disease on the front lines.

Cameron is among the physicians working at the COVID-19 assessment centre at the St. Joseph’s Healthcare King Street campus.

Along with physicians, the clinic includes nursing staff, a nurse practitioner and a team of screeners. Administrators are helping to organize the clinic, screen and register patients and book appointments. Cleaning staff also plays a vital role, keeping everything sterilized in the best way possible.

“It’s a big team effort,” Cameron said. “I feel like we’re all on the front lines right now. I’m thankful that I have an opportunity to contribute … and to take some of the burden off our colleagues in emergency departments who assist in screening.”

Cameron and her young family have made personal sacrifices as well. Cameron, her husband and children, aged four and eight, were supposed to be taking a vacation, but cancelled their plans as the global coronavirus pandemic worsened.

Cameron is still working in her Hamilton-based primary care clinic, but leaves a bit early for scheduled shifts at the assessment centre, where appointments take place from 4 to 8 p.m.

Coming home after a long day at work, it’s often difficult for health-care workers to decompress, Cameron noted.

“All of us who are working in health are finding it very difficult to turn off after being at the testing site, or even in our day-to-day work,” said Cameron. “We are all very concerned and all of our lives, including those on the front lines and those not, have been completely shifted because of this.”

Cameron takes the necessary precautions to protect herself from the virus, including the use of appropriate personal protective equipment.

“After each visit, there’s an incredible cleaning staff that clean all of the rooms. We change our clothes before we leave the hospital and shower right when we get home. That’s the current program,” said Cameron.

Assessment centre staff members are also very conscious of their own health and ensuring the absolute best measures are taken to reduce risk.

Cameron has discussed bacteria and viruses with her children. They’re very aware of what’s happening, she said. For the time being, her children aren’t allowed to go into other children’s homes or be in close contact with their friends.

“They recognize that there’s a virus that’s being transmitted between people and they have a responsibility to wash their hands and to not get as close (in) contact to people. They do understand that there is something that’s happening in the world,” said Cameron.

Every time before she goes to the clinic, Cameron’s eight-year-old daughter reminds her not to get the virus.

With more instances of community spread, Cameron said it’s now more important than ever to self-isolate and social distance to prevent further transmission.

Stoney Creek resident John Howard was hoping for the best earlier this month after he attended a scheduled followup appointment at the St. Joseph’s fracture clinic for a knee replacement procedure he had in February. At the time of his March 16 appointment, Howard, 64, presented with a mild fever, runny nose and dry cough.

While a surgeon gave him the thumbs up on his knee, Howard was also swabbed at the clinic to test for a possible COVID-19 infection. As of March 26, Howard feels fine, all things considered. Since Feb. 14, he’s been staying home, only leaving the house for medical appointments, out of an abundance of caution.

“It’s a little stressful,” said Howard. “(But) the people I do have around I love dearly.”

On March 27, Howard contacted his family doctor who confirmed he had tested negative for coronavirus.

Cameron noted that in addition to social and physical distancing, the general public can help health-care workers by donating masks and baby monitors.

St. Joseph’s has created an email account, donations@stjoes.ca, for anyone able to donate.

During an online media conference March 26, Dr. Bart Harvey, the city’s associate medical officer of health, and Paul Johnson, director of the city’s emergency operations centre, reiterated calls for social or physical distancing of at least two metres to prevent community spread.

“The main job is block the transmission of the virus from one person to another,” said Harvey.

Johnson said hearing stories about residents ignoring calls for physical distancing is the most difficult part of his job.

“To be honest, what each and every one of us can do is pretty straightforward,” Johnson said. “Use proper hygiene — handwashing and all the rest. And keep a physical distance of two metres. If you’re sick, don’t go to work. Contact people and follow the right processes to see if you may have the symptoms of COVID-19 or opportunities to be tested.”


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: With coronavirus dominating the headlines, we reached out to St. Joseph's Healthcare for an in-depth look at how front-line health-care workers are fighting the pandemic.

Dr. Lita Cameron helping St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton in the fight against coronavirus

#supportourheroes

News Mar 26, 2020 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

As millions of Canadians retreat to their homes for social and physical distancing in the fight against coronavirus, Dr. Lita Cameron is one of many battling the disease on the front lines.

Cameron is among the physicians working at the COVID-19 assessment centre at the St. Joseph’s Healthcare King Street campus.

Along with physicians, the clinic includes nursing staff, a nurse practitioner and a team of screeners. Administrators are helping to organize the clinic, screen and register patients and book appointments. Cleaning staff also plays a vital role, keeping everything sterilized in the best way possible.

“It’s a big team effort,” Cameron said. “I feel like we’re all on the front lines right now. I’m thankful that I have an opportunity to contribute … and to take some of the burden off our colleagues in emergency departments who assist in screening.”

“It’s a big team effort...I feel like we’re all on the front lines right now" - Dr. Lita Cameron

Cameron and her young family have made personal sacrifices as well. Cameron, her husband and children, aged four and eight, were supposed to be taking a vacation, but cancelled their plans as the global coronavirus pandemic worsened.

Cameron is still working in her Hamilton-based primary care clinic, but leaves a bit early for scheduled shifts at the assessment centre, where appointments take place from 4 to 8 p.m.

Coming home after a long day at work, it’s often difficult for health-care workers to decompress, Cameron noted.

“All of us who are working in health are finding it very difficult to turn off after being at the testing site, or even in our day-to-day work,” said Cameron. “We are all very concerned and all of our lives, including those on the front lines and those not, have been completely shifted because of this.”

Cameron takes the necessary precautions to protect herself from the virus, including the use of appropriate personal protective equipment.

“After each visit, there’s an incredible cleaning staff that clean all of the rooms. We change our clothes before we leave the hospital and shower right when we get home. That’s the current program,” said Cameron.

Assessment centre staff members are also very conscious of their own health and ensuring the absolute best measures are taken to reduce risk.

Cameron has discussed bacteria and viruses with her children. They’re very aware of what’s happening, she said. For the time being, her children aren’t allowed to go into other children’s homes or be in close contact with their friends.

“They recognize that there’s a virus that’s being transmitted between people and they have a responsibility to wash their hands and to not get as close (in) contact to people. They do understand that there is something that’s happening in the world,” said Cameron.

Every time before she goes to the clinic, Cameron’s eight-year-old daughter reminds her not to get the virus.

With more instances of community spread, Cameron said it’s now more important than ever to self-isolate and social distance to prevent further transmission.

Stoney Creek resident John Howard was hoping for the best earlier this month after he attended a scheduled followup appointment at the St. Joseph’s fracture clinic for a knee replacement procedure he had in February. At the time of his March 16 appointment, Howard, 64, presented with a mild fever, runny nose and dry cough.

While a surgeon gave him the thumbs up on his knee, Howard was also swabbed at the clinic to test for a possible COVID-19 infection. As of March 26, Howard feels fine, all things considered. Since Feb. 14, he’s been staying home, only leaving the house for medical appointments, out of an abundance of caution.

“It’s a little stressful,” said Howard. “(But) the people I do have around I love dearly.”

On March 27, Howard contacted his family doctor who confirmed he had tested negative for coronavirus.

Cameron noted that in addition to social and physical distancing, the general public can help health-care workers by donating masks and baby monitors.

St. Joseph’s has created an email account, donations@stjoes.ca, for anyone able to donate.

During an online media conference March 26, Dr. Bart Harvey, the city’s associate medical officer of health, and Paul Johnson, director of the city’s emergency operations centre, reiterated calls for social or physical distancing of at least two metres to prevent community spread.

“The main job is block the transmission of the virus from one person to another,” said Harvey.

Johnson said hearing stories about residents ignoring calls for physical distancing is the most difficult part of his job.

“To be honest, what each and every one of us can do is pretty straightforward,” Johnson said. “Use proper hygiene — handwashing and all the rest. And keep a physical distance of two metres. If you’re sick, don’t go to work. Contact people and follow the right processes to see if you may have the symptoms of COVID-19 or opportunities to be tested.”


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: With coronavirus dominating the headlines, we reached out to St. Joseph's Healthcare for an in-depth look at how front-line health-care workers are fighting the pandemic.

Dr. Lita Cameron helping St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton in the fight against coronavirus

#supportourheroes

News Mar 26, 2020 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

As millions of Canadians retreat to their homes for social and physical distancing in the fight against coronavirus, Dr. Lita Cameron is one of many battling the disease on the front lines.

Cameron is among the physicians working at the COVID-19 assessment centre at the St. Joseph’s Healthcare King Street campus.

Along with physicians, the clinic includes nursing staff, a nurse practitioner and a team of screeners. Administrators are helping to organize the clinic, screen and register patients and book appointments. Cleaning staff also plays a vital role, keeping everything sterilized in the best way possible.

“It’s a big team effort,” Cameron said. “I feel like we’re all on the front lines right now. I’m thankful that I have an opportunity to contribute … and to take some of the burden off our colleagues in emergency departments who assist in screening.”

“It’s a big team effort...I feel like we’re all on the front lines right now" - Dr. Lita Cameron

Cameron and her young family have made personal sacrifices as well. Cameron, her husband and children, aged four and eight, were supposed to be taking a vacation, but cancelled their plans as the global coronavirus pandemic worsened.

Cameron is still working in her Hamilton-based primary care clinic, but leaves a bit early for scheduled shifts at the assessment centre, where appointments take place from 4 to 8 p.m.

Coming home after a long day at work, it’s often difficult for health-care workers to decompress, Cameron noted.

“All of us who are working in health are finding it very difficult to turn off after being at the testing site, or even in our day-to-day work,” said Cameron. “We are all very concerned and all of our lives, including those on the front lines and those not, have been completely shifted because of this.”

Cameron takes the necessary precautions to protect herself from the virus, including the use of appropriate personal protective equipment.

“After each visit, there’s an incredible cleaning staff that clean all of the rooms. We change our clothes before we leave the hospital and shower right when we get home. That’s the current program,” said Cameron.

Assessment centre staff members are also very conscious of their own health and ensuring the absolute best measures are taken to reduce risk.

Cameron has discussed bacteria and viruses with her children. They’re very aware of what’s happening, she said. For the time being, her children aren’t allowed to go into other children’s homes or be in close contact with their friends.

“They recognize that there’s a virus that’s being transmitted between people and they have a responsibility to wash their hands and to not get as close (in) contact to people. They do understand that there is something that’s happening in the world,” said Cameron.

Every time before she goes to the clinic, Cameron’s eight-year-old daughter reminds her not to get the virus.

With more instances of community spread, Cameron said it’s now more important than ever to self-isolate and social distance to prevent further transmission.

Stoney Creek resident John Howard was hoping for the best earlier this month after he attended a scheduled followup appointment at the St. Joseph’s fracture clinic for a knee replacement procedure he had in February. At the time of his March 16 appointment, Howard, 64, presented with a mild fever, runny nose and dry cough.

While a surgeon gave him the thumbs up on his knee, Howard was also swabbed at the clinic to test for a possible COVID-19 infection. As of March 26, Howard feels fine, all things considered. Since Feb. 14, he’s been staying home, only leaving the house for medical appointments, out of an abundance of caution.

“It’s a little stressful,” said Howard. “(But) the people I do have around I love dearly.”

On March 27, Howard contacted his family doctor who confirmed he had tested negative for coronavirus.

Cameron noted that in addition to social and physical distancing, the general public can help health-care workers by donating masks and baby monitors.

St. Joseph’s has created an email account, donations@stjoes.ca, for anyone able to donate.

During an online media conference March 26, Dr. Bart Harvey, the city’s associate medical officer of health, and Paul Johnson, director of the city’s emergency operations centre, reiterated calls for social or physical distancing of at least two metres to prevent community spread.

“The main job is block the transmission of the virus from one person to another,” said Harvey.

Johnson said hearing stories about residents ignoring calls for physical distancing is the most difficult part of his job.

“To be honest, what each and every one of us can do is pretty straightforward,” Johnson said. “Use proper hygiene — handwashing and all the rest. And keep a physical distance of two metres. If you’re sick, don’t go to work. Contact people and follow the right processes to see if you may have the symptoms of COVID-19 or opportunities to be tested.”


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: With coronavirus dominating the headlines, we reached out to St. Joseph's Healthcare for an in-depth look at how front-line health-care workers are fighting the pandemic.