Dundas essential services still operating for now despite coronavirus scare

News Mar 18, 2020 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Important local services like the Dundas food bank and Meals on Wheels continue to operate, with some slight alterations, in the face of the COVID-19 virus scare that has shut down businesses and events across the community.

“We’re an essential service. We don’t want to shut down,” said Karen Sobierajski, program manager of The Dundas Salvation Army.

While the food bank continues to operate as usual, the King Street West and John Street location has cancelled all of its other programs.

Dundas Community Services also continues to operate its most essential services — Meals on Wheels preparation and delivery, and assisted transportation services.

Jane Allen, DCS executive director, said as of Wednesday, March 18, the organization volunteer were still being allowed entry into Wentworth Lodge long-term care facility, where they prepare the meals. Volunteers are being screened at entry.

“Our volunteers are now leaving meals outside of our clients apartments (or) homes, but are encouraged to ensure the client knows the meal has arrived,” Allen said. “We are discouraging person-to-person contact, so they are only having enough verbal contact to let the client know that their meal is available.”

The organization’s friendly visitor program has stopped visiting clients in person, and are now calling to check-in, talk, and make sure they have all they need for self-isolation.

Allen said the agency remains open, but all staff, volunteers and visitors are screened by answering questions about their, and their acquaintances, recent travel, and the health of both. Hand sanitizer is also supplied, and everyone keeps their distance from each other.

“At this time, we are staying open unless we are told to close,” Allen said. “At the end of the day, we are just using self-care with hand sanitizer, no direct contact and calling clients and volunteers to see if they are doing OK or if they need assistance.”

It’s much the same at the food bank, where client appointments are staggered to avoid people crossing each other’s path, or having groups wait.

 

Dundas essential services still operating for now despite coronavirus scare

Food bank, Meals on Wheels, senior transportation all available

News Mar 18, 2020 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Important local services like the Dundas food bank and Meals on Wheels continue to operate, with some slight alterations, in the face of the COVID-19 virus scare that has shut down businesses and events across the community.

“We’re an essential service. We don’t want to shut down,” said Karen Sobierajski, program manager of The Dundas Salvation Army.

While the food bank continues to operate as usual, the King Street West and John Street location has cancelled all of its other programs.

Dundas Community Services also continues to operate its most essential services — Meals on Wheels preparation and delivery, and assisted transportation services.

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Jane Allen, DCS executive director, said as of Wednesday, March 18, the organization volunteer were still being allowed entry into Wentworth Lodge long-term care facility, where they prepare the meals. Volunteers are being screened at entry.

“Our volunteers are now leaving meals outside of our clients apartments (or) homes, but are encouraged to ensure the client knows the meal has arrived,” Allen said. “We are discouraging person-to-person contact, so they are only having enough verbal contact to let the client know that their meal is available.”

The organization’s friendly visitor program has stopped visiting clients in person, and are now calling to check-in, talk, and make sure they have all they need for self-isolation.

Allen said the agency remains open, but all staff, volunteers and visitors are screened by answering questions about their, and their acquaintances, recent travel, and the health of both. Hand sanitizer is also supplied, and everyone keeps their distance from each other.

“At this time, we are staying open unless we are told to close,” Allen said. “At the end of the day, we are just using self-care with hand sanitizer, no direct contact and calling clients and volunteers to see if they are doing OK or if they need assistance.”

It’s much the same at the food bank, where client appointments are staggered to avoid people crossing each other’s path, or having groups wait.

 

Dundas essential services still operating for now despite coronavirus scare

Food bank, Meals on Wheels, senior transportation all available

News Mar 18, 2020 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Important local services like the Dundas food bank and Meals on Wheels continue to operate, with some slight alterations, in the face of the COVID-19 virus scare that has shut down businesses and events across the community.

“We’re an essential service. We don’t want to shut down,” said Karen Sobierajski, program manager of The Dundas Salvation Army.

While the food bank continues to operate as usual, the King Street West and John Street location has cancelled all of its other programs.

Dundas Community Services also continues to operate its most essential services — Meals on Wheels preparation and delivery, and assisted transportation services.

Related Content

Jane Allen, DCS executive director, said as of Wednesday, March 18, the organization volunteer were still being allowed entry into Wentworth Lodge long-term care facility, where they prepare the meals. Volunteers are being screened at entry.

“Our volunteers are now leaving meals outside of our clients apartments (or) homes, but are encouraged to ensure the client knows the meal has arrived,” Allen said. “We are discouraging person-to-person contact, so they are only having enough verbal contact to let the client know that their meal is available.”

The organization’s friendly visitor program has stopped visiting clients in person, and are now calling to check-in, talk, and make sure they have all they need for self-isolation.

Allen said the agency remains open, but all staff, volunteers and visitors are screened by answering questions about their, and their acquaintances, recent travel, and the health of both. Hand sanitizer is also supplied, and everyone keeps their distance from each other.

“At this time, we are staying open unless we are told to close,” Allen said. “At the end of the day, we are just using self-care with hand sanitizer, no direct contact and calling clients and volunteers to see if they are doing OK or if they need assistance.”

It’s much the same at the food bank, where client appointments are staggered to avoid people crossing each other’s path, or having groups wait.