Glass ceiling persists for Hamilton school board’s top jobs

News Mar 17, 2020 by Richard Leitner hamiltonnews.com

The Hamilton public school board’s first-ever staff census shows a greater percentage of employees are female and white than the city’s population, but that men are still twice as likely to be in senior roles like principals and superintendents despite being in the minority.

Only about a third of 7,619 employees took part in the voluntary, confidential survey known as We All Count last April, so it’s not clear if the results are truly representative of the board's workforce, a staff report on the findings states.

But of the 2,505 respondents, 78.3 per cent identified as female and 88 per cent as white, with just nine per cent indicating they were racialized.

Just 20.5 per cent indicated they were men, with another 1.2 per cent identifying as something other than male or female.

By comparison, the report notes, federal census data show 51 per cent of Hamilton’s population is female, while 19 per cent identify as racialized.

Despite their big majority, only about 55 per cent of women employees were principals and just six of the board’s current 12-member executive council of directors and superintendents are women.

At the lower end of the wage scale, 92 per cent of educational assistants were women.

Among racialized employees, none was a senior administrator, compared to a Hamilton rate of seven per cent for similar positions. Early childhood educators had the most visible minorities at 13.2 per cent.

Board chair Alex Johnstone called the employee census an important first step in creating “a more equitable, inclusive, accessible and supportive environment for all of our staff and students.”

She said the data will inform a hiring practices equity audit already underway, noting the board has been trying to recruit from under-represented groups, including through job fairs geared toward new immigrants.

The board is also planning to gather identity-based student data next year as part of an equity action plan.

“We’ve come a long way, but we very much still have a long ways to go,” Johnstone said.

“The next part is to ensure that we’re acting on the information we’ve received, that we’re proactively identifying what are the barriers, putting in plans, putting in strategies to ensure we are doing everything within our capacity to break down barriers.”

The census found 2.1 per cent of employees identified as Indigenous, more than the 1.5 per cent in Hamilton’s population, but just below the Ontario average of 2.2 per cent.

Asked about sexual orientation, 87.5 per cent identified as heterosexual, although one in six respondents skipped the question.

At 14.7 per cent, the employees indicating they had a disability was higher than Ontario’s 9.1 per cent average and also exceeded the provincial mark in nearly every job classification, including managers.

Only 10 per cent weren’t born in Canada, with the United Kingdom, United States and India the top three other countries of origin.

On religion, 57.6 per cent indicated they were Christian, 31.3 per cent had none and 1.6 were Muslim.

Glass ceiling persists for Hamilton school board’s top jobs

Racial minorities also under-represented, employee census shows

News Mar 17, 2020 by Richard Leitner hamiltonnews.com

The Hamilton public school board’s first-ever staff census shows a greater percentage of employees are female and white than the city’s population, but that men are still twice as likely to be in senior roles like principals and superintendents despite being in the minority.

Only about a third of 7,619 employees took part in the voluntary, confidential survey known as We All Count last April, so it’s not clear if the results are truly representative of the board's workforce, a staff report on the findings states.

But of the 2,505 respondents, 78.3 per cent identified as female and 88 per cent as white, with just nine per cent indicating they were racialized.

Just 20.5 per cent indicated they were men, with another 1.2 per cent identifying as something other than male or female.

By comparison, the report notes, federal census data show 51 per cent of Hamilton’s population is female, while 19 per cent identify as racialized.

Despite their big majority, only about 55 per cent of women employees were principals and just six of the board’s current 12-member executive council of directors and superintendents are women.

At the lower end of the wage scale, 92 per cent of educational assistants were women.

Among racialized employees, none was a senior administrator, compared to a Hamilton rate of seven per cent for similar positions. Early childhood educators had the most visible minorities at 13.2 per cent.

Board chair Alex Johnstone called the employee census an important first step in creating “a more equitable, inclusive, accessible and supportive environment for all of our staff and students.”

She said the data will inform a hiring practices equity audit already underway, noting the board has been trying to recruit from under-represented groups, including through job fairs geared toward new immigrants.

The board is also planning to gather identity-based student data next year as part of an equity action plan.

“We’ve come a long way, but we very much still have a long ways to go,” Johnstone said.

“The next part is to ensure that we’re acting on the information we’ve received, that we’re proactively identifying what are the barriers, putting in plans, putting in strategies to ensure we are doing everything within our capacity to break down barriers.”

The census found 2.1 per cent of employees identified as Indigenous, more than the 1.5 per cent in Hamilton’s population, but just below the Ontario average of 2.2 per cent.

Asked about sexual orientation, 87.5 per cent identified as heterosexual, although one in six respondents skipped the question.

At 14.7 per cent, the employees indicating they had a disability was higher than Ontario’s 9.1 per cent average and also exceeded the provincial mark in nearly every job classification, including managers.

Only 10 per cent weren’t born in Canada, with the United Kingdom, United States and India the top three other countries of origin.

On religion, 57.6 per cent indicated they were Christian, 31.3 per cent had none and 1.6 were Muslim.

Glass ceiling persists for Hamilton school board’s top jobs

Racial minorities also under-represented, employee census shows

News Mar 17, 2020 by Richard Leitner hamiltonnews.com

The Hamilton public school board’s first-ever staff census shows a greater percentage of employees are female and white than the city’s population, but that men are still twice as likely to be in senior roles like principals and superintendents despite being in the minority.

Only about a third of 7,619 employees took part in the voluntary, confidential survey known as We All Count last April, so it’s not clear if the results are truly representative of the board's workforce, a staff report on the findings states.

But of the 2,505 respondents, 78.3 per cent identified as female and 88 per cent as white, with just nine per cent indicating they were racialized.

Just 20.5 per cent indicated they were men, with another 1.2 per cent identifying as something other than male or female.

By comparison, the report notes, federal census data show 51 per cent of Hamilton’s population is female, while 19 per cent identify as racialized.

Despite their big majority, only about 55 per cent of women employees were principals and just six of the board’s current 12-member executive council of directors and superintendents are women.

At the lower end of the wage scale, 92 per cent of educational assistants were women.

Among racialized employees, none was a senior administrator, compared to a Hamilton rate of seven per cent for similar positions. Early childhood educators had the most visible minorities at 13.2 per cent.

Board chair Alex Johnstone called the employee census an important first step in creating “a more equitable, inclusive, accessible and supportive environment for all of our staff and students.”

She said the data will inform a hiring practices equity audit already underway, noting the board has been trying to recruit from under-represented groups, including through job fairs geared toward new immigrants.

The board is also planning to gather identity-based student data next year as part of an equity action plan.

“We’ve come a long way, but we very much still have a long ways to go,” Johnstone said.

“The next part is to ensure that we’re acting on the information we’ve received, that we’re proactively identifying what are the barriers, putting in plans, putting in strategies to ensure we are doing everything within our capacity to break down barriers.”

The census found 2.1 per cent of employees identified as Indigenous, more than the 1.5 per cent in Hamilton’s population, but just below the Ontario average of 2.2 per cent.

Asked about sexual orientation, 87.5 per cent identified as heterosexual, although one in six respondents skipped the question.

At 14.7 per cent, the employees indicating they had a disability was higher than Ontario’s 9.1 per cent average and also exceeded the provincial mark in nearly every job classification, including managers.

Only 10 per cent weren’t born in Canada, with the United Kingdom, United States and India the top three other countries of origin.

On religion, 57.6 per cent indicated they were Christian, 31.3 per cent had none and 1.6 were Muslim.