Hamilton opens two COVID-19 assessment centres in Westdale, Stoney Creek

News Mar 16, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton is opening two COVID-19 Assessment Centres, with the possibility that additional facilities will be launched in the future.

Public Health officials announced Monday, March 16 that the centres will open at the West End Clinic, 690 Main St. W. in Westdale, and the East End Clinic, 2757 King St. E., near Stoney Creek.

The West End Clinic’s hours will be Monday to Friday, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The East End Clinic’s hours will be Monday to Friday, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

But before attending an assessment centre, patients are required to complete a self-assessment on the provincial website www.ontario.ca/coronavirus to determine if it is even necessary to contact a public health official, their doctor or use Telehealth Ontario.

The centres will see patients who have a referral from their doctor or Hamilton Public Health Services by appointment only. Health officials will determine if an appointment is needed based upon symptoms, such as a cough, fever, travel history or exposure to known cases.

The assessment centres are a collaborative effort between McMaster Family Health Team, Hamilton Family Health Team, Compass Community Health Centre, Hamilton Health Sciences, St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton Public Health Services and the province.

Dr. Elizabeth Richardson, Hamilton’s medical officer of health, stated in the city’s news release that opening two assessment centres “will further help to contain the spread of infection in our community while reducing the pressure on an already overburdened health-care system.”

Richardson has said during several news conferences that Hamilton officials have been in discussions with provincial officials to open assessment centres in the city after five centres opened in the Greater Toronto Area last week.

In 2009, Hamilton opened an assessment centre for the H1N1 outbreak.

Assessment centres have been up and running across the Greater Toronto Area where hundreds of patients have been showing up with possible symptoms of the virus.

At those centres, when patients arrive, they are assessed by a doctor or nurse. Based on that assessment, the patient may get tested.

People have reported problems receiving assessments at the centres and, after waiting patiently, have resorted to visiting already crowded hospital emergency rooms to see a health official. Hospital and provincial officials are discouraging people from going to emergency rooms.

So far, Hamilton has seen five positive COVID-19 tests. There are currently 84 people under investigation and 110 who have tested negative.

In Ontario, there are a total of 177 confirmed cases of COVID-19.

There are currently 1,537 people under investigation in the province, with more than 8,460 people in Ontario who have tested negative.

People should be prepared to show their health cards and bring a list of current medications when visiting the assessment centres, said officials.

Health officials said visitors will not be able to accompany patients to the assessment centres, except when an adult brings a child as a patient, a frail, older person, a person with a disability or a person acting as an interpreter for the patient.

For additional information, check out hamilton.ca/covid19assessment.

Hamilton opens two COVID-19 assessment centres in Westdale, Stoney Creek

News Mar 16, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton is opening two COVID-19 Assessment Centres, with the possibility that additional facilities will be launched in the future.

Public Health officials announced Monday, March 16 that the centres will open at the West End Clinic, 690 Main St. W. in Westdale, and the East End Clinic, 2757 King St. E., near Stoney Creek.

The West End Clinic’s hours will be Monday to Friday, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Related Content

The East End Clinic’s hours will be Monday to Friday, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

But before attending an assessment centre, patients are required to complete a self-assessment on the provincial website www.ontario.ca/coronavirus to determine if it is even necessary to contact a public health official, their doctor or use Telehealth Ontario.

The centres will see patients who have a referral from their doctor or Hamilton Public Health Services by appointment only. Health officials will determine if an appointment is needed based upon symptoms, such as a cough, fever, travel history or exposure to known cases.

The assessment centres are a collaborative effort between McMaster Family Health Team, Hamilton Family Health Team, Compass Community Health Centre, Hamilton Health Sciences, St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton Public Health Services and the province.

Dr. Elizabeth Richardson, Hamilton’s medical officer of health, stated in the city’s news release that opening two assessment centres “will further help to contain the spread of infection in our community while reducing the pressure on an already overburdened health-care system.”

Richardson has said during several news conferences that Hamilton officials have been in discussions with provincial officials to open assessment centres in the city after five centres opened in the Greater Toronto Area last week.

In 2009, Hamilton opened an assessment centre for the H1N1 outbreak.

Assessment centres have been up and running across the Greater Toronto Area where hundreds of patients have been showing up with possible symptoms of the virus.

At those centres, when patients arrive, they are assessed by a doctor or nurse. Based on that assessment, the patient may get tested.

People have reported problems receiving assessments at the centres and, after waiting patiently, have resorted to visiting already crowded hospital emergency rooms to see a health official. Hospital and provincial officials are discouraging people from going to emergency rooms.

So far, Hamilton has seen five positive COVID-19 tests. There are currently 84 people under investigation and 110 who have tested negative.

In Ontario, there are a total of 177 confirmed cases of COVID-19.

There are currently 1,537 people under investigation in the province, with more than 8,460 people in Ontario who have tested negative.

People should be prepared to show their health cards and bring a list of current medications when visiting the assessment centres, said officials.

Health officials said visitors will not be able to accompany patients to the assessment centres, except when an adult brings a child as a patient, a frail, older person, a person with a disability or a person acting as an interpreter for the patient.

For additional information, check out hamilton.ca/covid19assessment.

Hamilton opens two COVID-19 assessment centres in Westdale, Stoney Creek

News Mar 16, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton is opening two COVID-19 Assessment Centres, with the possibility that additional facilities will be launched in the future.

Public Health officials announced Monday, March 16 that the centres will open at the West End Clinic, 690 Main St. W. in Westdale, and the East End Clinic, 2757 King St. E., near Stoney Creek.

The West End Clinic’s hours will be Monday to Friday, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Related Content

The East End Clinic’s hours will be Monday to Friday, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

But before attending an assessment centre, patients are required to complete a self-assessment on the provincial website www.ontario.ca/coronavirus to determine if it is even necessary to contact a public health official, their doctor or use Telehealth Ontario.

The centres will see patients who have a referral from their doctor or Hamilton Public Health Services by appointment only. Health officials will determine if an appointment is needed based upon symptoms, such as a cough, fever, travel history or exposure to known cases.

The assessment centres are a collaborative effort between McMaster Family Health Team, Hamilton Family Health Team, Compass Community Health Centre, Hamilton Health Sciences, St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton Public Health Services and the province.

Dr. Elizabeth Richardson, Hamilton’s medical officer of health, stated in the city’s news release that opening two assessment centres “will further help to contain the spread of infection in our community while reducing the pressure on an already overburdened health-care system.”

Richardson has said during several news conferences that Hamilton officials have been in discussions with provincial officials to open assessment centres in the city after five centres opened in the Greater Toronto Area last week.

In 2009, Hamilton opened an assessment centre for the H1N1 outbreak.

Assessment centres have been up and running across the Greater Toronto Area where hundreds of patients have been showing up with possible symptoms of the virus.

At those centres, when patients arrive, they are assessed by a doctor or nurse. Based on that assessment, the patient may get tested.

People have reported problems receiving assessments at the centres and, after waiting patiently, have resorted to visiting already crowded hospital emergency rooms to see a health official. Hospital and provincial officials are discouraging people from going to emergency rooms.

So far, Hamilton has seen five positive COVID-19 tests. There are currently 84 people under investigation and 110 who have tested negative.

In Ontario, there are a total of 177 confirmed cases of COVID-19.

There are currently 1,537 people under investigation in the province, with more than 8,460 people in Ontario who have tested negative.

People should be prepared to show their health cards and bring a list of current medications when visiting the assessment centres, said officials.

Health officials said visitors will not be able to accompany patients to the assessment centres, except when an adult brings a child as a patient, a frail, older person, a person with a disability or a person acting as an interpreter for the patient.

For additional information, check out hamilton.ca/covid19assessment.