Stoney Creek community group looks to preserve heritage features of 'Millen store'

News Feb 26, 2020 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

A Stoney Creek community group is hoping to work with a building owner to preserve historic features of the former Millen general store, believed to be the site of the village’s first business.

According to records from the Virtual Museum of Canada, business was conducted at the building — at 25 King St. E. at the corner of Mountain Ave. N. — as early as 1820. The community’s first post office opened there in 1832. In 1903, A.R. Millen purchased the business from Isaac Corman.

Last year, Hamilton’s municipal heritage committee added the buildings to its list of non-designated properties of cultural value. City heritage staff examined the buildings and determined “no action” be taken to prevent demolition.

Jillian Harris, president and founder of the Olde Town Stoney Creek Community Association, said the not-for-profit citizens’ group hopes to discuss plans with the buildings’ owners sometime in March.

Along with the community’s first business and post office, Stoney Creek’s Masonic Lodge previously held meetings at the site, Harris said. While both buildings have been significantly altered, Harris said some of the best-preserved historical features can be found in the basement of 25 King. Key elements include original stonework, hand-hewn beams with square nails and a furnace that’s over 200 years old.

“We’ve reached out to the owners of the property and have been told they have plans to redevelop the property themselves,” Harris said during a Feb. 25 community meeting.

Harris said the community association is arranging a dialogue meeting with the property owners about future plans for the site.

“We really need to think about what we want to do moving forward,” said Harris. “We’re lucky that we have someone who’s interested in the community, who owns the property and can maybe talk to them about what we can do to salvage and celebrate the history moving forward.”

Olde Town Stoney Creek Community Association vice-president Kathy Wakeman lamented the fact 25 King wasn’t selected for historical designation, calling the process subjective. But Wakeman, who also serves on the boards of Stoney Creek’s Chamber of Commerce and historical society, hopes the redevelopment of the property will honour local heritage.

“There’s iterations of generations of families and historical people and historical events that happened in this building,” she said. “And I think as a community association, what we want is that the streetscape remain heritage. We’re not saying, ‘Don’t put a shiny, glassy silvery looking building there.’ We’re saying, ‘Keep the streetscape consistent with the heritage features. Use the façade of these buildings so it still looks like Olde Town Stoney Creek.’”

Stoney Creek community group looks to preserve heritage features of 'Millen store'

Demolition has been approved for 23 and 25 King St. E.

News Feb 26, 2020 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

A Stoney Creek community group is hoping to work with a building owner to preserve historic features of the former Millen general store, believed to be the site of the village’s first business.

According to records from the Virtual Museum of Canada, business was conducted at the building — at 25 King St. E. at the corner of Mountain Ave. N. — as early as 1820. The community’s first post office opened there in 1832. In 1903, A.R. Millen purchased the business from Isaac Corman.

Last year, Hamilton’s municipal heritage committee added the buildings to its list of non-designated properties of cultural value. City heritage staff examined the buildings and determined “no action” be taken to prevent demolition.

Jillian Harris, president and founder of the Olde Town Stoney Creek Community Association, said the not-for-profit citizens’ group hopes to discuss plans with the buildings’ owners sometime in March.

Along with the community’s first business and post office, Stoney Creek’s Masonic Lodge previously held meetings at the site, Harris said. While both buildings have been significantly altered, Harris said some of the best-preserved historical features can be found in the basement of 25 King. Key elements include original stonework, hand-hewn beams with square nails and a furnace that’s over 200 years old.

“We’ve reached out to the owners of the property and have been told they have plans to redevelop the property themselves,” Harris said during a Feb. 25 community meeting.

Harris said the community association is arranging a dialogue meeting with the property owners about future plans for the site.

“We really need to think about what we want to do moving forward,” said Harris. “We’re lucky that we have someone who’s interested in the community, who owns the property and can maybe talk to them about what we can do to salvage and celebrate the history moving forward.”

Olde Town Stoney Creek Community Association vice-president Kathy Wakeman lamented the fact 25 King wasn’t selected for historical designation, calling the process subjective. But Wakeman, who also serves on the boards of Stoney Creek’s Chamber of Commerce and historical society, hopes the redevelopment of the property will honour local heritage.

“There’s iterations of generations of families and historical people and historical events that happened in this building,” she said. “And I think as a community association, what we want is that the streetscape remain heritage. We’re not saying, ‘Don’t put a shiny, glassy silvery looking building there.’ We’re saying, ‘Keep the streetscape consistent with the heritage features. Use the façade of these buildings so it still looks like Olde Town Stoney Creek.’”

Stoney Creek community group looks to preserve heritage features of 'Millen store'

Demolition has been approved for 23 and 25 King St. E.

News Feb 26, 2020 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

A Stoney Creek community group is hoping to work with a building owner to preserve historic features of the former Millen general store, believed to be the site of the village’s first business.

According to records from the Virtual Museum of Canada, business was conducted at the building — at 25 King St. E. at the corner of Mountain Ave. N. — as early as 1820. The community’s first post office opened there in 1832. In 1903, A.R. Millen purchased the business from Isaac Corman.

Last year, Hamilton’s municipal heritage committee added the buildings to its list of non-designated properties of cultural value. City heritage staff examined the buildings and determined “no action” be taken to prevent demolition.

Jillian Harris, president and founder of the Olde Town Stoney Creek Community Association, said the not-for-profit citizens’ group hopes to discuss plans with the buildings’ owners sometime in March.

Along with the community’s first business and post office, Stoney Creek’s Masonic Lodge previously held meetings at the site, Harris said. While both buildings have been significantly altered, Harris said some of the best-preserved historical features can be found in the basement of 25 King. Key elements include original stonework, hand-hewn beams with square nails and a furnace that’s over 200 years old.

“We’ve reached out to the owners of the property and have been told they have plans to redevelop the property themselves,” Harris said during a Feb. 25 community meeting.

Harris said the community association is arranging a dialogue meeting with the property owners about future plans for the site.

“We really need to think about what we want to do moving forward,” said Harris. “We’re lucky that we have someone who’s interested in the community, who owns the property and can maybe talk to them about what we can do to salvage and celebrate the history moving forward.”

Olde Town Stoney Creek Community Association vice-president Kathy Wakeman lamented the fact 25 King wasn’t selected for historical designation, calling the process subjective. But Wakeman, who also serves on the boards of Stoney Creek’s Chamber of Commerce and historical society, hopes the redevelopment of the property will honour local heritage.

“There’s iterations of generations of families and historical people and historical events that happened in this building,” she said. “And I think as a community association, what we want is that the streetscape remain heritage. We’re not saying, ‘Don’t put a shiny, glassy silvery looking building there.’ We’re saying, ‘Keep the streetscape consistent with the heritage features. Use the façade of these buildings so it still looks like Olde Town Stoney Creek.’”