Nash neighbourhood school edges toward reality

News Jan 13, 2020 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton public school trustees have given staff the go-ahead to buy a 2.4-hectare property for a new elementary school in upper Stoney Creek’s Nash neighbourhood as part of efforts to accommodate the area’s booming student population.

Board chair Alex Johnstone said education levies on new homes and commercial development will pay for the First Road West site, located next door to the Heritage Green Community Sports Park but also kitty-corner from the Taro industrial dump.

The school is among five projects the board submitted to the Ministry of Education in September for the first round of capital funding requests since the Ford government took office.

“The sites that schools are allocated are all part of the city plan” for the neighbourhood, Johnstone said when asked about the proximity to the dump, which was recently approved for an expansion that is expected to keep it open for another 15 years.

Students from the Nash neighbourhood are in the meantime being bused to Tapleytown school, as are new students in the Billy Green catchment area because enrolment there is nearly 200 above capacity, requiring seven portable classrooms.

Still in limbo is a $9-million upgrade to Mount Albion school, which has a 292-student capacity but added its 10th portable in September as enrolment jumped by another 60 students, to 504.

The previous Liberal government approved a $6.5-million addition with 10 classrooms and three child care rooms at the school two years ago, but a request to tender the project has been awaiting the education minister’s signature since May.

Johnstone said the board’s proposal to use its own money from the sale of surplus school properties to build a bigger gym is holding up the work, originally intended to begin last summer.

“It’s been an extremely frustrating process waiting to receive approval from the ministry. We have high accommodation pressures in upper Stoney Creek that need to be addressed,” she said.

“The community has been waiting patiently and staff has put together a thoughtful plan, and our students deserve to have schools that can accommodate their learning needs.”

Stoney Creek trustee Cam Galindo said he’s been hearing from parents who are unhappy with ministry approval delays, which have also held up a new gym at Billy Green that was to be built last summer.

He said a recent holiday-season concert in the Paramount Drive school’s gym was standing room only, prompting questions why the replacement is taking so long.

“Frustration is starting to grow with parents and members in the community as we’re awaiting approval to proceed on those projects. I’m definitely sensing that,” Galindo said.

The opening of the new Shannen Koostachin Elementary School at Summit Park in September did provide some relief to accommodation pressures at Janet Lee and Tapleytown schools.

While Janet Lee now has only one portable, down from four last June, Tapleytown has kept five of seven portables.

“I suspect the numbers at Tapleytown are going to increase drastically as development continues to grow in the Nash neighbourhood,” Galindo said. “I think we’re going to become a portable school system pretty soon.”

Koostachin has done little to relieve overcrowding at Binbrook’s Bellmoore school, which still has 19 portables to accommodate 1,109 students at a building constructed for 640.

Trustees included a new school near the corner of Binbrook and Fletcher roads in the board’s capital funding request, but Johnstone said the 2.4-hectare property isn’t yet available for purchase.

She said the board is hopeful that the installation of temporary services to the area will make the property available soon.

We wanted to examine the impact of delays to planned school expansions in upper Stoney Creek and how the school board is managing with a booming population.

Upper Stoney Creek Nash neighbourhood school edges toward reality

Project hopes to relieve overcrowding at area schools

News Jan 13, 2020 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton public school trustees have given staff the go-ahead to buy a 2.4-hectare property for a new elementary school in upper Stoney Creek’s Nash neighbourhood as part of efforts to accommodate the area’s booming student population.

Board chair Alex Johnstone said education levies on new homes and commercial development will pay for the First Road West site, located next door to the Heritage Green Community Sports Park but also kitty-corner from the Taro industrial dump.

The school is among five projects the board submitted to the Ministry of Education in September for the first round of capital funding requests since the Ford government took office.

“The sites that schools are allocated are all part of the city plan” for the neighbourhood, Johnstone said when asked about the proximity to the dump, which was recently approved for an expansion that is expected to keep it open for another 15 years.

Students from the Nash neighbourhood are in the meantime being bused to Tapleytown school, as are new students in the Billy Green catchment area because enrolment there is nearly 200 above capacity, requiring seven portable classrooms.

Still in limbo is a $9-million upgrade to Mount Albion school, which has a 292-student capacity but added its 10th portable in September as enrolment jumped by another 60 students, to 504.

The previous Liberal government approved a $6.5-million addition with 10 classrooms and three child care rooms at the school two years ago, but a request to tender the project has been awaiting the education minister’s signature since May.

Johnstone said the board’s proposal to use its own money from the sale of surplus school properties to build a bigger gym is holding up the work, originally intended to begin last summer.

“It’s been an extremely frustrating process waiting to receive approval from the ministry. We have high accommodation pressures in upper Stoney Creek that need to be addressed,” she said.

“The community has been waiting patiently and staff has put together a thoughtful plan, and our students deserve to have schools that can accommodate their learning needs.”

Stoney Creek trustee Cam Galindo said he’s been hearing from parents who are unhappy with ministry approval delays, which have also held up a new gym at Billy Green that was to be built last summer.

He said a recent holiday-season concert in the Paramount Drive school’s gym was standing room only, prompting questions why the replacement is taking so long.

“Frustration is starting to grow with parents and members in the community as we’re awaiting approval to proceed on those projects. I’m definitely sensing that,” Galindo said.

The opening of the new Shannen Koostachin Elementary School at Summit Park in September did provide some relief to accommodation pressures at Janet Lee and Tapleytown schools.

While Janet Lee now has only one portable, down from four last June, Tapleytown has kept five of seven portables.

“I suspect the numbers at Tapleytown are going to increase drastically as development continues to grow in the Nash neighbourhood,” Galindo said. “I think we’re going to become a portable school system pretty soon.”

Koostachin has done little to relieve overcrowding at Binbrook’s Bellmoore school, which still has 19 portables to accommodate 1,109 students at a building constructed for 640.

Trustees included a new school near the corner of Binbrook and Fletcher roads in the board’s capital funding request, but Johnstone said the 2.4-hectare property isn’t yet available for purchase.

She said the board is hopeful that the installation of temporary services to the area will make the property available soon.

We wanted to examine the impact of delays to planned school expansions in upper Stoney Creek and how the school board is managing with a booming population.

Upper Stoney Creek Nash neighbourhood school edges toward reality

Project hopes to relieve overcrowding at area schools

News Jan 13, 2020 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton public school trustees have given staff the go-ahead to buy a 2.4-hectare property for a new elementary school in upper Stoney Creek’s Nash neighbourhood as part of efforts to accommodate the area’s booming student population.

Board chair Alex Johnstone said education levies on new homes and commercial development will pay for the First Road West site, located next door to the Heritage Green Community Sports Park but also kitty-corner from the Taro industrial dump.

The school is among five projects the board submitted to the Ministry of Education in September for the first round of capital funding requests since the Ford government took office.

“The sites that schools are allocated are all part of the city plan” for the neighbourhood, Johnstone said when asked about the proximity to the dump, which was recently approved for an expansion that is expected to keep it open for another 15 years.

Students from the Nash neighbourhood are in the meantime being bused to Tapleytown school, as are new students in the Billy Green catchment area because enrolment there is nearly 200 above capacity, requiring seven portable classrooms.

Still in limbo is a $9-million upgrade to Mount Albion school, which has a 292-student capacity but added its 10th portable in September as enrolment jumped by another 60 students, to 504.

The previous Liberal government approved a $6.5-million addition with 10 classrooms and three child care rooms at the school two years ago, but a request to tender the project has been awaiting the education minister’s signature since May.

Johnstone said the board’s proposal to use its own money from the sale of surplus school properties to build a bigger gym is holding up the work, originally intended to begin last summer.

“It’s been an extremely frustrating process waiting to receive approval from the ministry. We have high accommodation pressures in upper Stoney Creek that need to be addressed,” she said.

“The community has been waiting patiently and staff has put together a thoughtful plan, and our students deserve to have schools that can accommodate their learning needs.”

Stoney Creek trustee Cam Galindo said he’s been hearing from parents who are unhappy with ministry approval delays, which have also held up a new gym at Billy Green that was to be built last summer.

He said a recent holiday-season concert in the Paramount Drive school’s gym was standing room only, prompting questions why the replacement is taking so long.

“Frustration is starting to grow with parents and members in the community as we’re awaiting approval to proceed on those projects. I’m definitely sensing that,” Galindo said.

The opening of the new Shannen Koostachin Elementary School at Summit Park in September did provide some relief to accommodation pressures at Janet Lee and Tapleytown schools.

While Janet Lee now has only one portable, down from four last June, Tapleytown has kept five of seven portables.

“I suspect the numbers at Tapleytown are going to increase drastically as development continues to grow in the Nash neighbourhood,” Galindo said. “I think we’re going to become a portable school system pretty soon.”

Koostachin has done little to relieve overcrowding at Binbrook’s Bellmoore school, which still has 19 portables to accommodate 1,109 students at a building constructed for 640.

Trustees included a new school near the corner of Binbrook and Fletcher roads in the board’s capital funding request, but Johnstone said the 2.4-hectare property isn’t yet available for purchase.

She said the board is hopeful that the installation of temporary services to the area will make the property available soon.

We wanted to examine the impact of delays to planned school expansions in upper Stoney Creek and how the school board is managing with a booming population.