Ontario MPP Will Bouma says people 'don't want to pay' carbon tax

News Oct 25, 2019 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Ontario’s Progressive Conservative government doesn’t consider the federal election as a repudiation of its agenda, says Brantford-Brant MPP Will Bouma, parliamentary assistant to Premier Doug Ford.

“We are working hard for the people of Ontario,” said Bouma in an interview. “This was a federal election. The Liberal government tried really hard to make it (a referendum on Ford’s policies). But we weren’t going there.”

When asked why Ford didn’t campaign for federal Conservative leader Andrew Scheer and with Alberta Premier Jason Kenney when both were in Ontario to help out the campaign, Bouma said that Ford was “really busy” meeting Ontario people and attending events such as in Kenora and Toronto.

Bouma, who spoke to the Macdonald-Cartier Club of Hamilton at the Best Western Premier C Hotel by Carmen’s Oct. 24, said the province will continue its legal challenge of the Liberal government’s carbon pricing to the Supreme Court of Canada.

“What we hear consistently is people in Ontario don’t want the carbon tax,” he said.

He dismissed Canadians who voted for the Liberals, NDP and Green parties and their climate change platforms, saying people didn’t really understand “what the facts are” and how the parties would reduce carbon emissions.

In June, Ontario’s top court struck down Ontario’s case against the tax, saying that the federal legislation — the Greenhouse Gas Pollution Pricing Act, enacted in April — is constitutionally sound. The same day the Ford government said it would appeal the decision to the Supreme Court.

But in August, Ford said he would consult with the provincial attorney general and cabinet after the federal election to determine the next move. Ford said at the time that voters would be the ones to determine the fate of the appeal.

Bouma, who was appointed Ford’s parliamentary assistant in June, made it clear that the government will continue its $30-million appeal.

“We are still running with that,” he said. “The people of Ontario don’t want to pay.”

During his presentation to the club, Bouma trumpeted the Ford government’s accomplishments after being in office for 16 months, saying there has been “real progress” made on health care, transportation, infrastructure, child care and “restoring our province’s finances.”

But Hamilton councillors would disagree with that assessment after bearing the brunt of public health cuts, the clawback of $3 million from the Ancaster Arts Centre project, the elimination of green funding for schools, the elimination of the basic income pilot project, cuts to affordable housing funding and other program funding reductions or outright eliminations.

In response, Bouma, a former Brant County councillor, blamed critics — including the media and public sector unions — for causing most of the government's image problems.

“When you have people actually working against you and not taking up any of the opportunities to find efficiencies in order to run government better, they are not working for their people, they are working to score political points,” he said. “It makes it difficult to work with these people.”

Bouma was referring to the PC offer of up to $7.35 million for third-party audits in order to find efficiencies. Nonetheless, Hamilton was one of several municipalities that agreed to apply for the funding.

Bouma, though, did acknowledge during his presentation to about 45 people at the breakfast event that the PC’s first year in office has been “messy” — just like a construction site.

“We had a pretty ugly year in government,” he said. “A construction site is messy Just a big muddy mess. We dug the holes, we put in the foundation, we put in the walls. You can’t see what it looks like yet, but we have a vision.”

Part of that strategy includes eliminating the deficit from what the Progressive Conservatives argue was a $15.5 billion deficit left by the outgoing Liberals and slicing about $3.3 billion this past year, even though the government imposed a tax cut last year, said Bouma.

Ontario’s deficit for 2018-19 is half than what the Ford government claimed it was after taking power from the former Kathleen Wynne Liberals. Last year’s deficit was $7.4 billion, according to the 2018-19 public accounts released by the province in September.

In August 2018 the Ford government said the 2018-19 deficit was running at $15 billion, and stuck to the figure when it tabled its April budget this year and revised the projected deficit to $11.7 billion.

“People are saying we inflated the numbers,” said Bouma. “Really? Do the math. It’s clearly not sustainable. We have to take care of this province.”

He said the government received more tax revenue from a growing economy, while at the same time it continues to spend money on education and health care. He said any money that is saved from cutting red tape is directed to debt reduction.

“We are getting more tax revenue because people are doing better,” he said, referring to the low employment rate in the province.

“We are putting Ontario back on a fiscally responsible path,” he said.

Ontario Tories won't halt carbon tax legal challenge

News Oct 25, 2019 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Ontario’s Progressive Conservative government doesn’t consider the federal election as a repudiation of its agenda, says Brantford-Brant MPP Will Bouma, parliamentary assistant to Premier Doug Ford.

“We are working hard for the people of Ontario,” said Bouma in an interview. “This was a federal election. The Liberal government tried really hard to make it (a referendum on Ford’s policies). But we weren’t going there.”

When asked why Ford didn’t campaign for federal Conservative leader Andrew Scheer and with Alberta Premier Jason Kenney when both were in Ontario to help out the campaign, Bouma said that Ford was “really busy” meeting Ontario people and attending events such as in Kenora and Toronto.

Bouma, who spoke to the Macdonald-Cartier Club of Hamilton at the Best Western Premier C Hotel by Carmen’s Oct. 24, said the province will continue its legal challenge of the Liberal government’s carbon pricing to the Supreme Court of Canada.

“When you have people actually working against you and not taking up any of the opportunities to find efficiencies in order to run government better, they are not working for their people, they are working to score political points.” — Will Bouma

“What we hear consistently is people in Ontario don’t want the carbon tax,” he said.

He dismissed Canadians who voted for the Liberals, NDP and Green parties and their climate change platforms, saying people didn’t really understand “what the facts are” and how the parties would reduce carbon emissions.

In June, Ontario’s top court struck down Ontario’s case against the tax, saying that the federal legislation — the Greenhouse Gas Pollution Pricing Act, enacted in April — is constitutionally sound. The same day the Ford government said it would appeal the decision to the Supreme Court.

But in August, Ford said he would consult with the provincial attorney general and cabinet after the federal election to determine the next move. Ford said at the time that voters would be the ones to determine the fate of the appeal.

Bouma, who was appointed Ford’s parliamentary assistant in June, made it clear that the government will continue its $30-million appeal.

“We are still running with that,” he said. “The people of Ontario don’t want to pay.”

During his presentation to the club, Bouma trumpeted the Ford government’s accomplishments after being in office for 16 months, saying there has been “real progress” made on health care, transportation, infrastructure, child care and “restoring our province’s finances.”

But Hamilton councillors would disagree with that assessment after bearing the brunt of public health cuts, the clawback of $3 million from the Ancaster Arts Centre project, the elimination of green funding for schools, the elimination of the basic income pilot project, cuts to affordable housing funding and other program funding reductions or outright eliminations.

In response, Bouma, a former Brant County councillor, blamed critics — including the media and public sector unions — for causing most of the government's image problems.

“When you have people actually working against you and not taking up any of the opportunities to find efficiencies in order to run government better, they are not working for their people, they are working to score political points,” he said. “It makes it difficult to work with these people.”

Bouma was referring to the PC offer of up to $7.35 million for third-party audits in order to find efficiencies. Nonetheless, Hamilton was one of several municipalities that agreed to apply for the funding.

Bouma, though, did acknowledge during his presentation to about 45 people at the breakfast event that the PC’s first year in office has been “messy” — just like a construction site.

“We had a pretty ugly year in government,” he said. “A construction site is messy Just a big muddy mess. We dug the holes, we put in the foundation, we put in the walls. You can’t see what it looks like yet, but we have a vision.”

Part of that strategy includes eliminating the deficit from what the Progressive Conservatives argue was a $15.5 billion deficit left by the outgoing Liberals and slicing about $3.3 billion this past year, even though the government imposed a tax cut last year, said Bouma.

Ontario’s deficit for 2018-19 is half than what the Ford government claimed it was after taking power from the former Kathleen Wynne Liberals. Last year’s deficit was $7.4 billion, according to the 2018-19 public accounts released by the province in September.

In August 2018 the Ford government said the 2018-19 deficit was running at $15 billion, and stuck to the figure when it tabled its April budget this year and revised the projected deficit to $11.7 billion.

“People are saying we inflated the numbers,” said Bouma. “Really? Do the math. It’s clearly not sustainable. We have to take care of this province.”

He said the government received more tax revenue from a growing economy, while at the same time it continues to spend money on education and health care. He said any money that is saved from cutting red tape is directed to debt reduction.

“We are getting more tax revenue because people are doing better,” he said, referring to the low employment rate in the province.

“We are putting Ontario back on a fiscally responsible path,” he said.

Ontario Tories won't halt carbon tax legal challenge

News Oct 25, 2019 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Ontario’s Progressive Conservative government doesn’t consider the federal election as a repudiation of its agenda, says Brantford-Brant MPP Will Bouma, parliamentary assistant to Premier Doug Ford.

“We are working hard for the people of Ontario,” said Bouma in an interview. “This was a federal election. The Liberal government tried really hard to make it (a referendum on Ford’s policies). But we weren’t going there.”

When asked why Ford didn’t campaign for federal Conservative leader Andrew Scheer and with Alberta Premier Jason Kenney when both were in Ontario to help out the campaign, Bouma said that Ford was “really busy” meeting Ontario people and attending events such as in Kenora and Toronto.

Bouma, who spoke to the Macdonald-Cartier Club of Hamilton at the Best Western Premier C Hotel by Carmen’s Oct. 24, said the province will continue its legal challenge of the Liberal government’s carbon pricing to the Supreme Court of Canada.

“When you have people actually working against you and not taking up any of the opportunities to find efficiencies in order to run government better, they are not working for their people, they are working to score political points.” — Will Bouma

“What we hear consistently is people in Ontario don’t want the carbon tax,” he said.

He dismissed Canadians who voted for the Liberals, NDP and Green parties and their climate change platforms, saying people didn’t really understand “what the facts are” and how the parties would reduce carbon emissions.

In June, Ontario’s top court struck down Ontario’s case against the tax, saying that the federal legislation — the Greenhouse Gas Pollution Pricing Act, enacted in April — is constitutionally sound. The same day the Ford government said it would appeal the decision to the Supreme Court.

But in August, Ford said he would consult with the provincial attorney general and cabinet after the federal election to determine the next move. Ford said at the time that voters would be the ones to determine the fate of the appeal.

Bouma, who was appointed Ford’s parliamentary assistant in June, made it clear that the government will continue its $30-million appeal.

“We are still running with that,” he said. “The people of Ontario don’t want to pay.”

During his presentation to the club, Bouma trumpeted the Ford government’s accomplishments after being in office for 16 months, saying there has been “real progress” made on health care, transportation, infrastructure, child care and “restoring our province’s finances.”

But Hamilton councillors would disagree with that assessment after bearing the brunt of public health cuts, the clawback of $3 million from the Ancaster Arts Centre project, the elimination of green funding for schools, the elimination of the basic income pilot project, cuts to affordable housing funding and other program funding reductions or outright eliminations.

In response, Bouma, a former Brant County councillor, blamed critics — including the media and public sector unions — for causing most of the government's image problems.

“When you have people actually working against you and not taking up any of the opportunities to find efficiencies in order to run government better, they are not working for their people, they are working to score political points,” he said. “It makes it difficult to work with these people.”

Bouma was referring to the PC offer of up to $7.35 million for third-party audits in order to find efficiencies. Nonetheless, Hamilton was one of several municipalities that agreed to apply for the funding.

Bouma, though, did acknowledge during his presentation to about 45 people at the breakfast event that the PC’s first year in office has been “messy” — just like a construction site.

“We had a pretty ugly year in government,” he said. “A construction site is messy Just a big muddy mess. We dug the holes, we put in the foundation, we put in the walls. You can’t see what it looks like yet, but we have a vision.”

Part of that strategy includes eliminating the deficit from what the Progressive Conservatives argue was a $15.5 billion deficit left by the outgoing Liberals and slicing about $3.3 billion this past year, even though the government imposed a tax cut last year, said Bouma.

Ontario’s deficit for 2018-19 is half than what the Ford government claimed it was after taking power from the former Kathleen Wynne Liberals. Last year’s deficit was $7.4 billion, according to the 2018-19 public accounts released by the province in September.

In August 2018 the Ford government said the 2018-19 deficit was running at $15 billion, and stuck to the figure when it tabled its April budget this year and revised the projected deficit to $11.7 billion.

“People are saying we inflated the numbers,” said Bouma. “Really? Do the math. It’s clearly not sustainable. We have to take care of this province.”

He said the government received more tax revenue from a growing economy, while at the same time it continues to spend money on education and health care. He said any money that is saved from cutting red tape is directed to debt reduction.

“We are getting more tax revenue because people are doing better,” he said, referring to the low employment rate in the province.

“We are putting Ontario back on a fiscally responsible path,” he said.