Dundas Meals on Wheels celebrates 50 years of support

News Oct 04, 2019 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Anne Redish, 94, is clear on the impact of the local Meals on Wheels program, which marks its 50th anniversary in Dundas this month.

“I think it’s important because it does provide a good healthy meal for people who are finding it difficult to provide that for themselves,” Redish said.

After serving as a volunteer driver for the Dundas Community Services Meals on Wheels program since the early 1970s, Redish is now on “the receiving end” of the program started here in 1969.

“I always knew it was a good service, before I used it myself.”

Redish continues to live in her own home, thanks largely to support from DCS and its Meals on Wheels volunteers.

“I think that applies to a lot of us,” she said.

Dundas Community Services will celebrate five decades of the program that sees volunteers deliver full meals to people in their homes on Thursday, Oct. 17 from 2 to 4 p.m. at Wentworth Lodge, where the meals are prepared each day.

Dr. Cathy Risdon, professor of family medicine at McMaster University, said a 50th anniversary for Meals on Wheels is a very significant accomplishment.

“The volunteers and staff at Dundas Community Services should be very proud,” she said.

Risdon said the goal of many patients is to preserve a sense of dignity as they age and a substantial number may live alone and be socially isolated, without family supports.

She called Meals on Wheels “a vital and unsung hero in the social net that preserves dignity and choice for people who need extra support.

“We know a lot about how important good nutrition is as we age. We are also beginning to understand how much suffering occurs with social isolation.”

Risdon said Meals on Wheels supports physical health, promotes social connections essential to well-being and can be a lifeline if a client doesn’t answer the door to volunteers or appears to be in trouble when food is delivered.

“Meals on Wheels is the kind of program that punches above its weight when it comes to the health and well-being of seniors,” Risdon said. “Ensuring both food security and a friendly, caring quick visit and check-in accomplishes many things.”

The value of those daily safety checks has always stood out to Kaylee Norwood, Meals on Wheels co-ordinator at Dundas Community Services.

“Meals on Wheels is about so much more than a meal,” she said. “For some, the friendly Meals on Wheels volunteer may be the only person the client interacts with in a given day.”

Volunteers deliver to more than 40 clients daily in the Dundas area. During the fiscal year between April 2018 and March 2019, more than 8,000 meals were delivered.

“Our team of over 100 passionate and devoted volunteers are out in the community delivering meals rain or shine, and always with a smile on their faces,” Norwood said. “On behalf of Dundas Community Services, we would like to thank all of the volunteers, past and present, for their commitment to the Dundas community, and for the support of Wentworth Lodge and its staff.”

Shortly after the Association of Dundas Churches formed in late 1968, a local Meals on Wheels program was identified as one the first priorities.

By the end of October, 1969, the program was serving up to 15 meals a day to at least 10 people. By 1973, the program served 49 people and by 1979 there were 137 volunteers.

“As we reflect back on the program’s 50 years in Dundas, it is moving to think of all the lives it has touched and the countless volunteers who have made it happen over the years,” Norwood said.

According to the Ontario Community Support Association, Meals on Wheels had been in Canada for about six years when Dundas organized its own volunteer program.

The Canadian Red Cross started the first Ontario Meals on Wheels in Brantford in 1963, after a resident approached the organization to suggest replicating a program she witnessed in England.

Dundas Meals on Wheels celebrates 50 years of support

Dundas Community Service volunteer program provides healthy meals, contact

News Oct 04, 2019 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Anne Redish, 94, is clear on the impact of the local Meals on Wheels program, which marks its 50th anniversary in Dundas this month.

“I think it’s important because it does provide a good healthy meal for people who are finding it difficult to provide that for themselves,” Redish said.

After serving as a volunteer driver for the Dundas Community Services Meals on Wheels program since the early 1970s, Redish is now on “the receiving end” of the program started here in 1969.

“I always knew it was a good service, before I used it myself.”

Redish continues to live in her own home, thanks largely to support from DCS and its Meals on Wheels volunteers.

“I think that applies to a lot of us,” she said.

Dundas Community Services will celebrate five decades of the program that sees volunteers deliver full meals to people in their homes on Thursday, Oct. 17 from 2 to 4 p.m. at Wentworth Lodge, where the meals are prepared each day.

Dr. Cathy Risdon, professor of family medicine at McMaster University, said a 50th anniversary for Meals on Wheels is a very significant accomplishment.

“The volunteers and staff at Dundas Community Services should be very proud,” she said.

Risdon said the goal of many patients is to preserve a sense of dignity as they age and a substantial number may live alone and be socially isolated, without family supports.

She called Meals on Wheels “a vital and unsung hero in the social net that preserves dignity and choice for people who need extra support.

“We know a lot about how important good nutrition is as we age. We are also beginning to understand how much suffering occurs with social isolation.”

Risdon said Meals on Wheels supports physical health, promotes social connections essential to well-being and can be a lifeline if a client doesn’t answer the door to volunteers or appears to be in trouble when food is delivered.

“Meals on Wheels is the kind of program that punches above its weight when it comes to the health and well-being of seniors,” Risdon said. “Ensuring both food security and a friendly, caring quick visit and check-in accomplishes many things.”

The value of those daily safety checks has always stood out to Kaylee Norwood, Meals on Wheels co-ordinator at Dundas Community Services.

“Meals on Wheels is about so much more than a meal,” she said. “For some, the friendly Meals on Wheels volunteer may be the only person the client interacts with in a given day.”

Volunteers deliver to more than 40 clients daily in the Dundas area. During the fiscal year between April 2018 and March 2019, more than 8,000 meals were delivered.

“Our team of over 100 passionate and devoted volunteers are out in the community delivering meals rain or shine, and always with a smile on their faces,” Norwood said. “On behalf of Dundas Community Services, we would like to thank all of the volunteers, past and present, for their commitment to the Dundas community, and for the support of Wentworth Lodge and its staff.”

Shortly after the Association of Dundas Churches formed in late 1968, a local Meals on Wheels program was identified as one the first priorities.

By the end of October, 1969, the program was serving up to 15 meals a day to at least 10 people. By 1973, the program served 49 people and by 1979 there were 137 volunteers.

“As we reflect back on the program’s 50 years in Dundas, it is moving to think of all the lives it has touched and the countless volunteers who have made it happen over the years,” Norwood said.

According to the Ontario Community Support Association, Meals on Wheels had been in Canada for about six years when Dundas organized its own volunteer program.

The Canadian Red Cross started the first Ontario Meals on Wheels in Brantford in 1963, after a resident approached the organization to suggest replicating a program she witnessed in England.

Dundas Meals on Wheels celebrates 50 years of support

Dundas Community Service volunteer program provides healthy meals, contact

News Oct 04, 2019 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Anne Redish, 94, is clear on the impact of the local Meals on Wheels program, which marks its 50th anniversary in Dundas this month.

“I think it’s important because it does provide a good healthy meal for people who are finding it difficult to provide that for themselves,” Redish said.

After serving as a volunteer driver for the Dundas Community Services Meals on Wheels program since the early 1970s, Redish is now on “the receiving end” of the program started here in 1969.

“I always knew it was a good service, before I used it myself.”

Redish continues to live in her own home, thanks largely to support from DCS and its Meals on Wheels volunteers.

“I think that applies to a lot of us,” she said.

Dundas Community Services will celebrate five decades of the program that sees volunteers deliver full meals to people in their homes on Thursday, Oct. 17 from 2 to 4 p.m. at Wentworth Lodge, where the meals are prepared each day.

Dr. Cathy Risdon, professor of family medicine at McMaster University, said a 50th anniversary for Meals on Wheels is a very significant accomplishment.

“The volunteers and staff at Dundas Community Services should be very proud,” she said.

Risdon said the goal of many patients is to preserve a sense of dignity as they age and a substantial number may live alone and be socially isolated, without family supports.

She called Meals on Wheels “a vital and unsung hero in the social net that preserves dignity and choice for people who need extra support.

“We know a lot about how important good nutrition is as we age. We are also beginning to understand how much suffering occurs with social isolation.”

Risdon said Meals on Wheels supports physical health, promotes social connections essential to well-being and can be a lifeline if a client doesn’t answer the door to volunteers or appears to be in trouble when food is delivered.

“Meals on Wheels is the kind of program that punches above its weight when it comes to the health and well-being of seniors,” Risdon said. “Ensuring both food security and a friendly, caring quick visit and check-in accomplishes many things.”

The value of those daily safety checks has always stood out to Kaylee Norwood, Meals on Wheels co-ordinator at Dundas Community Services.

“Meals on Wheels is about so much more than a meal,” she said. “For some, the friendly Meals on Wheels volunteer may be the only person the client interacts with in a given day.”

Volunteers deliver to more than 40 clients daily in the Dundas area. During the fiscal year between April 2018 and March 2019, more than 8,000 meals were delivered.

“Our team of over 100 passionate and devoted volunteers are out in the community delivering meals rain or shine, and always with a smile on their faces,” Norwood said. “On behalf of Dundas Community Services, we would like to thank all of the volunteers, past and present, for their commitment to the Dundas community, and for the support of Wentworth Lodge and its staff.”

Shortly after the Association of Dundas Churches formed in late 1968, a local Meals on Wheels program was identified as one the first priorities.

By the end of October, 1969, the program was serving up to 15 meals a day to at least 10 people. By 1973, the program served 49 people and by 1979 there were 137 volunteers.

“As we reflect back on the program’s 50 years in Dundas, it is moving to think of all the lives it has touched and the countless volunteers who have made it happen over the years,” Norwood said.

According to the Ontario Community Support Association, Meals on Wheels had been in Canada for about six years when Dundas organized its own volunteer program.

The Canadian Red Cross started the first Ontario Meals on Wheels in Brantford in 1963, after a resident approached the organization to suggest replicating a program she witnessed in England.