Hamilton examines how to get electric vehicle stations into new developments

News Oct 02, 2019 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Electric charging stations could be a permanent requirement in all new developments in Hamilton.

Hamilton’s Oct. 1 planning committee approved a motion, introduced by Mountain Coun. John-Paul Danko, that requests planning staff to examine how the city can require electric vehicle charging stations to be available in all new developments.

In addition, the city will also look at requiring a time limit for all electric vehicles using charging stations for on-street and municipal parking lots to encourage “turnover,” said Danko.

“It will let staff evaluate what would be a number of appropriate electrical vehicle charging station (and) how they will be incorporate,” said Danko.

Mountain Coun. Terry Whitehead said he wants developers to be “obligated” to install the charging stations since it is “not that expensive” to design a building to accommodate them.

Ontario municipalities, including Hamilton, though, can’t strengthen the building code to require developers to incorporate the charging stations because the province prohibited it, said Jason Thorne, general manager of planning.

“We can’t require something more stringent than in the building code,” said Thorne. “It ties our hands in what we can require.”

Staff will examine how to incorporate the charging stations through the parking requirement in a new development’s application.

Hamilton last month approved installing 20 electric vehicle charging stations in selected municipal parking lots at a cost of about $500,000 during a 24-month pilot project. Almost half the cost will be covered through a Natural Resources Canada grant. The rest of the station costs will be covered through ward and parking reserves.

Staff will review the program and how effective the stations have been used and report back to councillors.

City planning staff identified Hamilton ranking last as having the least amount of electric vehicle charging stations among 18 area municipalities with populations of over 100,000.

Based upon provincial statistics, Hamilton has 467 electric vehicles registered in the city out of a total of 320,000 vehicles owned by households.  There are about 100,000 electric vehicles that have been sold in Canada.

A 2016 Independent Electricity System Operator study predicted there will be between 55,000 to 109,000 electric vehicles in Ontario by the year 2022, and up to 334,000 electric vehicles by 2025.

 

 

Hamilton studies having electric vehicle stations mandatory for new developments

News Oct 02, 2019 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Electric charging stations could be a permanent requirement in all new developments in Hamilton.

Hamilton’s Oct. 1 planning committee approved a motion, introduced by Mountain Coun. John-Paul Danko, that requests planning staff to examine how the city can require electric vehicle charging stations to be available in all new developments.

In addition, the city will also look at requiring a time limit for all electric vehicles using charging stations for on-street and municipal parking lots to encourage “turnover,” said Danko.

“It will let staff evaluate what would be a number of appropriate electrical vehicle charging station (and) how they will be incorporate,” said Danko.

Mountain Coun. Terry Whitehead said he wants developers to be “obligated” to install the charging stations since it is “not that expensive” to design a building to accommodate them.

Ontario municipalities, including Hamilton, though, can’t strengthen the building code to require developers to incorporate the charging stations because the province prohibited it, said Jason Thorne, general manager of planning.

“We can’t require something more stringent than in the building code,” said Thorne. “It ties our hands in what we can require.”

Staff will examine how to incorporate the charging stations through the parking requirement in a new development’s application.

Hamilton last month approved installing 20 electric vehicle charging stations in selected municipal parking lots at a cost of about $500,000 during a 24-month pilot project. Almost half the cost will be covered through a Natural Resources Canada grant. The rest of the station costs will be covered through ward and parking reserves.

Staff will review the program and how effective the stations have been used and report back to councillors.

City planning staff identified Hamilton ranking last as having the least amount of electric vehicle charging stations among 18 area municipalities with populations of over 100,000.

Based upon provincial statistics, Hamilton has 467 electric vehicles registered in the city out of a total of 320,000 vehicles owned by households.  There are about 100,000 electric vehicles that have been sold in Canada.

A 2016 Independent Electricity System Operator study predicted there will be between 55,000 to 109,000 electric vehicles in Ontario by the year 2022, and up to 334,000 electric vehicles by 2025.

 

 

Hamilton studies having electric vehicle stations mandatory for new developments

News Oct 02, 2019 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Electric charging stations could be a permanent requirement in all new developments in Hamilton.

Hamilton’s Oct. 1 planning committee approved a motion, introduced by Mountain Coun. John-Paul Danko, that requests planning staff to examine how the city can require electric vehicle charging stations to be available in all new developments.

In addition, the city will also look at requiring a time limit for all electric vehicles using charging stations for on-street and municipal parking lots to encourage “turnover,” said Danko.

“It will let staff evaluate what would be a number of appropriate electrical vehicle charging station (and) how they will be incorporate,” said Danko.

Mountain Coun. Terry Whitehead said he wants developers to be “obligated” to install the charging stations since it is “not that expensive” to design a building to accommodate them.

Ontario municipalities, including Hamilton, though, can’t strengthen the building code to require developers to incorporate the charging stations because the province prohibited it, said Jason Thorne, general manager of planning.

“We can’t require something more stringent than in the building code,” said Thorne. “It ties our hands in what we can require.”

Staff will examine how to incorporate the charging stations through the parking requirement in a new development’s application.

Hamilton last month approved installing 20 electric vehicle charging stations in selected municipal parking lots at a cost of about $500,000 during a 24-month pilot project. Almost half the cost will be covered through a Natural Resources Canada grant. The rest of the station costs will be covered through ward and parking reserves.

Staff will review the program and how effective the stations have been used and report back to councillors.

City planning staff identified Hamilton ranking last as having the least amount of electric vehicle charging stations among 18 area municipalities with populations of over 100,000.

Based upon provincial statistics, Hamilton has 467 electric vehicles registered in the city out of a total of 320,000 vehicles owned by households.  There are about 100,000 electric vehicles that have been sold in Canada.

A 2016 Independent Electricity System Operator study predicted there will be between 55,000 to 109,000 electric vehicles in Ontario by the year 2022, and up to 334,000 electric vehicles by 2025.