Dundas cycling priorities rolling along

News Jun 07, 2019 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

A critical mass bike ride through Dundas, along with “pop up” bike lanes, have illustrated support for improved cycling infrastructure expected in the Valley Town over the next few years, organizers say.

The 100 in 1 Day events on Saturday, June 1 sparked discussion around cycling priorities in Dundas. Work continues on new bike lanes on Governor’s Road, Creighton Road, Hatt Street and Dundas Street, eventually creating community-wide links. Dundas Rides and Dundas Works are promoting additional cycling projects that members feel are needed to increase connectivity.

Rich Gelder of Dundas Rides, who organized the critical mass ride, said there’s an appetite for better cycling infrastructure.

“It will get more people on their bikes and out of their cars,” Gelder said.

One suggestion he heard was for more critical mass rides in Dundas, including a glow ride — which takes place after the sun goes down and features bikes lit up with lights and flashers.

Gelder, who described the critical mass ride as an overwhelming success, said almost 100 bikes took part.

“The whole point is to be present on the road, as we have the right to do,” he said, but added the event showed there is still work to be done.

A father was reluctant to participate with his young daughter because her bike was still on training wheels and they didn’t feel safe.

“This is exactly why we have to continue having these critical mass rides,” Gelder said.

Concerns about sharing the road and bike-car conflicts may also show the need for separated cycling lanes and paths.

Margot Carnahan of Dundas Works said complete communities and streets create safe and inclusive spaces for the people who live there.

"There is a growing enthusiasm and need for safe commuter cycling routes in Dundas,” Carnahan said. “We must advocate for cycling infrastructure in Dundas that would connect our neighbourhoods to each other and to major routes across Hamilton."

Construction currently underway on the final phase of improvements to Governor’s Road, between Davidson Boulevard and Creighton Road, includes bike lanes. From Creighton to Moss Boulevard, there will be a two-way bike path on the south side of Governor’s. A conventional bike lane will continue west of Moss to Davidson.

Daryl Bender, the City of Hamilton's alternative transportation project manager, said the design of conventional painted bike lanes on Creighton and Market Street, linking Governor’s Road to Hatt Street, is 85 per cent complete.

“The Creighton project is planned to be installed later this year in conjunction with the opening of the bicycle path along Governor’s Road,” Bender said.

Governor’s is targeted for completion as soon as the end of July. That could mean opening the Governor’s Road and Creighton-Market bike lanes as early as August, in time for the start of school.

At Hatt Street, planning continues for future bike lanes on both sides of the street, separated from vehicle traffic. The project is being done as one part of Hatt Street’s reconstruction, and updating of design guidelines for development along the road.

Erika Waite, City of Hamilton manager of asset management, said a functional design for Hatt Street is underway so the entire project can be proposed to city council in the 2020 capital budget.

“Once approval is gained, the project will enter the three- to five-year capital delivery schedule for public consultation where required, detailed design and utility co-ordination prior to the commencement of construction,” Waite said. “More detail should be available through the budget process this fall.”

Another scheduled Dundas cycling infrastructure project is on Dundas Street. Bender said a design is not yet complete.

“They are planned to be conventional bicycle lanes along the curbs,” he said. “They will make a convenient connection between Hatt-York-Baldwin-West to Dundas Street. The future Hatt Street bicycle lanes will be well-connected to the Cootes Drive multi-use trail.”

Dundas Works and Dundas Rides produced a one-page summary of the four priority projects underway or in the planning and design stages.

“We as citizens and users of the lanes would like to be involved as these projects progress, ensuring their success and completion,” the cycling priorities document states.

The groups added two more bike lane projects not underway “but we believe are essential to connectivity of Dundas to Hamilton. We need to actively advocate for these projects.”

They include Ogilvie Street and Old Ancaster Road, linking King Street to the Hamilton-Brantford Rail Trail, and the “Five Schools Project” through Sanctuary Park from the rail trail to Highland Park Drive and including a crossing of Spencer Creek.

Dundas Rides is also supportive of attaining a bicycle-friendly designation for downtown Dundas from the Ontario By Bike Network.

Dundas cycling priorities rolling along

'Critical Mass' ride shows appetite for new links

News Jun 07, 2019 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

A critical mass bike ride through Dundas, along with “pop up” bike lanes, have illustrated support for improved cycling infrastructure expected in the Valley Town over the next few years, organizers say.

The 100 in 1 Day events on Saturday, June 1 sparked discussion around cycling priorities in Dundas. Work continues on new bike lanes on Governor’s Road, Creighton Road, Hatt Street and Dundas Street, eventually creating community-wide links. Dundas Rides and Dundas Works are promoting additional cycling projects that members feel are needed to increase connectivity.

Rich Gelder of Dundas Rides, who organized the critical mass ride, said there’s an appetite for better cycling infrastructure.

“It will get more people on their bikes and out of their cars,” Gelder said.

Related Content

One suggestion he heard was for more critical mass rides in Dundas, including a glow ride — which takes place after the sun goes down and features bikes lit up with lights and flashers.

Gelder, who described the critical mass ride as an overwhelming success, said almost 100 bikes took part.

“The whole point is to be present on the road, as we have the right to do,” he said, but added the event showed there is still work to be done.

A father was reluctant to participate with his young daughter because her bike was still on training wheels and they didn’t feel safe.

“This is exactly why we have to continue having these critical mass rides,” Gelder said.

Concerns about sharing the road and bike-car conflicts may also show the need for separated cycling lanes and paths.

Margot Carnahan of Dundas Works said complete communities and streets create safe and inclusive spaces for the people who live there.

"There is a growing enthusiasm and need for safe commuter cycling routes in Dundas,” Carnahan said. “We must advocate for cycling infrastructure in Dundas that would connect our neighbourhoods to each other and to major routes across Hamilton."

Construction currently underway on the final phase of improvements to Governor’s Road, between Davidson Boulevard and Creighton Road, includes bike lanes. From Creighton to Moss Boulevard, there will be a two-way bike path on the south side of Governor’s. A conventional bike lane will continue west of Moss to Davidson.

Daryl Bender, the City of Hamilton's alternative transportation project manager, said the design of conventional painted bike lanes on Creighton and Market Street, linking Governor’s Road to Hatt Street, is 85 per cent complete.

“The Creighton project is planned to be installed later this year in conjunction with the opening of the bicycle path along Governor’s Road,” Bender said.

Governor’s is targeted for completion as soon as the end of July. That could mean opening the Governor’s Road and Creighton-Market bike lanes as early as August, in time for the start of school.

At Hatt Street, planning continues for future bike lanes on both sides of the street, separated from vehicle traffic. The project is being done as one part of Hatt Street’s reconstruction, and updating of design guidelines for development along the road.

Erika Waite, City of Hamilton manager of asset management, said a functional design for Hatt Street is underway so the entire project can be proposed to city council in the 2020 capital budget.

“Once approval is gained, the project will enter the three- to five-year capital delivery schedule for public consultation where required, detailed design and utility co-ordination prior to the commencement of construction,” Waite said. “More detail should be available through the budget process this fall.”

Another scheduled Dundas cycling infrastructure project is on Dundas Street. Bender said a design is not yet complete.

“They are planned to be conventional bicycle lanes along the curbs,” he said. “They will make a convenient connection between Hatt-York-Baldwin-West to Dundas Street. The future Hatt Street bicycle lanes will be well-connected to the Cootes Drive multi-use trail.”

Dundas Works and Dundas Rides produced a one-page summary of the four priority projects underway or in the planning and design stages.

“We as citizens and users of the lanes would like to be involved as these projects progress, ensuring their success and completion,” the cycling priorities document states.

The groups added two more bike lane projects not underway “but we believe are essential to connectivity of Dundas to Hamilton. We need to actively advocate for these projects.”

They include Ogilvie Street and Old Ancaster Road, linking King Street to the Hamilton-Brantford Rail Trail, and the “Five Schools Project” through Sanctuary Park from the rail trail to Highland Park Drive and including a crossing of Spencer Creek.

Dundas Rides is also supportive of attaining a bicycle-friendly designation for downtown Dundas from the Ontario By Bike Network.

Dundas cycling priorities rolling along

'Critical Mass' ride shows appetite for new links

News Jun 07, 2019 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

A critical mass bike ride through Dundas, along with “pop up” bike lanes, have illustrated support for improved cycling infrastructure expected in the Valley Town over the next few years, organizers say.

The 100 in 1 Day events on Saturday, June 1 sparked discussion around cycling priorities in Dundas. Work continues on new bike lanes on Governor’s Road, Creighton Road, Hatt Street and Dundas Street, eventually creating community-wide links. Dundas Rides and Dundas Works are promoting additional cycling projects that members feel are needed to increase connectivity.

Rich Gelder of Dundas Rides, who organized the critical mass ride, said there’s an appetite for better cycling infrastructure.

“It will get more people on their bikes and out of their cars,” Gelder said.

Related Content

One suggestion he heard was for more critical mass rides in Dundas, including a glow ride — which takes place after the sun goes down and features bikes lit up with lights and flashers.

Gelder, who described the critical mass ride as an overwhelming success, said almost 100 bikes took part.

“The whole point is to be present on the road, as we have the right to do,” he said, but added the event showed there is still work to be done.

A father was reluctant to participate with his young daughter because her bike was still on training wheels and they didn’t feel safe.

“This is exactly why we have to continue having these critical mass rides,” Gelder said.

Concerns about sharing the road and bike-car conflicts may also show the need for separated cycling lanes and paths.

Margot Carnahan of Dundas Works said complete communities and streets create safe and inclusive spaces for the people who live there.

"There is a growing enthusiasm and need for safe commuter cycling routes in Dundas,” Carnahan said. “We must advocate for cycling infrastructure in Dundas that would connect our neighbourhoods to each other and to major routes across Hamilton."

Construction currently underway on the final phase of improvements to Governor’s Road, between Davidson Boulevard and Creighton Road, includes bike lanes. From Creighton to Moss Boulevard, there will be a two-way bike path on the south side of Governor’s. A conventional bike lane will continue west of Moss to Davidson.

Daryl Bender, the City of Hamilton's alternative transportation project manager, said the design of conventional painted bike lanes on Creighton and Market Street, linking Governor’s Road to Hatt Street, is 85 per cent complete.

“The Creighton project is planned to be installed later this year in conjunction with the opening of the bicycle path along Governor’s Road,” Bender said.

Governor’s is targeted for completion as soon as the end of July. That could mean opening the Governor’s Road and Creighton-Market bike lanes as early as August, in time for the start of school.

At Hatt Street, planning continues for future bike lanes on both sides of the street, separated from vehicle traffic. The project is being done as one part of Hatt Street’s reconstruction, and updating of design guidelines for development along the road.

Erika Waite, City of Hamilton manager of asset management, said a functional design for Hatt Street is underway so the entire project can be proposed to city council in the 2020 capital budget.

“Once approval is gained, the project will enter the three- to five-year capital delivery schedule for public consultation where required, detailed design and utility co-ordination prior to the commencement of construction,” Waite said. “More detail should be available through the budget process this fall.”

Another scheduled Dundas cycling infrastructure project is on Dundas Street. Bender said a design is not yet complete.

“They are planned to be conventional bicycle lanes along the curbs,” he said. “They will make a convenient connection between Hatt-York-Baldwin-West to Dundas Street. The future Hatt Street bicycle lanes will be well-connected to the Cootes Drive multi-use trail.”

Dundas Works and Dundas Rides produced a one-page summary of the four priority projects underway or in the planning and design stages.

“We as citizens and users of the lanes would like to be involved as these projects progress, ensuring their success and completion,” the cycling priorities document states.

The groups added two more bike lane projects not underway “but we believe are essential to connectivity of Dundas to Hamilton. We need to actively advocate for these projects.”

They include Ogilvie Street and Old Ancaster Road, linking King Street to the Hamilton-Brantford Rail Trail, and the “Five Schools Project” through Sanctuary Park from the rail trail to Highland Park Drive and including a crossing of Spencer Creek.

Dundas Rides is also supportive of attaining a bicycle-friendly designation for downtown Dundas from the Ontario By Bike Network.