Hamilton approves terms of reference for Red Hill Parkway judicial inquiry

News Apr 18, 2019 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton councillors have set aside $7 million for the Red Hill Valley Parkway judicial inquiry that will attempt to answer at least 24 questions as to why a consultant’s report on the roadway made it into councillors’ hands about five years after it was completed.

The inquiry is expected to take over a year. It will probe why the report wasn't discovered until 2018 and examine whether appropriate steps were taken to disclose the report and its recommendations once it was found.

Other considerations include whether the city was negligent in failing to disclose the report, whether roadway users were put at risk as a result of the city's failure to disclose the report’s findings and whether the buried report contributed to accidents, injuries or fatalities on the Red Hill since January 2014.

“We tried to make (the questions) as broadly worded as possible but at the same time giving some direction as to the precise questions we wish to be answered," said Eli Lederman, of the legal firm Lenczner Slaght Royce Smith Griffin LLP, which has been retained by the city to represent it at the judicial inquiry.

The commission that oversees judicial inquiries has the ability to revise the terms of reference that have been approved by council.

The questions that establish the terms of reference for the judicial inquiry were created from a series of themes that councillors presented to Lederman a few weeks ago.

Lederman said he is proposing the judicial inquiry could take about a year, but he cautioned “it is really just an outside estimate without knowing, without having a discussion with the judicial officer that is selected to conduct the judicial investigation. Hard to say it will be one year.”

Judicial inquiries can last longer than expected depending upon the issues the inquiry follows, Lederman told councillors earlier. For example the Toronto leasing inquiry cost $19 million over three and a half years ending 2005 and made 241 recommendations.

The $7 million will be taken from the city’s tax stabilization reserve. City officials say it is “unknown” how much the judicial inquiry will cost.

He said a judge is expected to be appointed, possibly 10 days after the terms of references are provided to the Chief Justice of the Superior Court of Ontario. Lederman said he will submit the terms of reference once council approves them April 24.

“We hope to start it as soon as possible,” said Lederman.

He said the city wants the inquiry to be held in Hamilton, at a location that is accessible to the public, and to be broadcast by the media.

Hamilton budget's $7 million for Red Hill Parkway judicial inquiry

News Apr 18, 2019 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton councillors have set aside $7 million for the Red Hill Valley Parkway judicial inquiry that will attempt to answer at least 24 questions as to why a consultant’s report on the roadway made it into councillors’ hands about five years after it was completed.

The inquiry is expected to take over a year. It will probe why the report wasn't discovered until 2018 and examine whether appropriate steps were taken to disclose the report and its recommendations once it was found.

Other considerations include whether the city was negligent in failing to disclose the report, whether roadway users were put at risk as a result of the city's failure to disclose the report’s findings and whether the buried report contributed to accidents, injuries or fatalities on the Red Hill since January 2014.

“We tried to make (the questions) as broadly worded as possible but at the same time giving some direction as to the precise questions we wish to be answered," said Eli Lederman, of the legal firm Lenczner Slaght Royce Smith Griffin LLP, which has been retained by the city to represent it at the judicial inquiry.

The commission that oversees judicial inquiries has the ability to revise the terms of reference that have been approved by council.

The questions that establish the terms of reference for the judicial inquiry were created from a series of themes that councillors presented to Lederman a few weeks ago.

Lederman said he is proposing the judicial inquiry could take about a year, but he cautioned “it is really just an outside estimate without knowing, without having a discussion with the judicial officer that is selected to conduct the judicial investigation. Hard to say it will be one year.”

Judicial inquiries can last longer than expected depending upon the issues the inquiry follows, Lederman told councillors earlier. For example the Toronto leasing inquiry cost $19 million over three and a half years ending 2005 and made 241 recommendations.

The $7 million will be taken from the city’s tax stabilization reserve. City officials say it is “unknown” how much the judicial inquiry will cost.

He said a judge is expected to be appointed, possibly 10 days after the terms of references are provided to the Chief Justice of the Superior Court of Ontario. Lederman said he will submit the terms of reference once council approves them April 24.

“We hope to start it as soon as possible,” said Lederman.

He said the city wants the inquiry to be held in Hamilton, at a location that is accessible to the public, and to be broadcast by the media.

Hamilton budget's $7 million for Red Hill Parkway judicial inquiry

News Apr 18, 2019 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton councillors have set aside $7 million for the Red Hill Valley Parkway judicial inquiry that will attempt to answer at least 24 questions as to why a consultant’s report on the roadway made it into councillors’ hands about five years after it was completed.

The inquiry is expected to take over a year. It will probe why the report wasn't discovered until 2018 and examine whether appropriate steps were taken to disclose the report and its recommendations once it was found.

Other considerations include whether the city was negligent in failing to disclose the report, whether roadway users were put at risk as a result of the city's failure to disclose the report’s findings and whether the buried report contributed to accidents, injuries or fatalities on the Red Hill since January 2014.

“We tried to make (the questions) as broadly worded as possible but at the same time giving some direction as to the precise questions we wish to be answered," said Eli Lederman, of the legal firm Lenczner Slaght Royce Smith Griffin LLP, which has been retained by the city to represent it at the judicial inquiry.

The commission that oversees judicial inquiries has the ability to revise the terms of reference that have been approved by council.

The questions that establish the terms of reference for the judicial inquiry were created from a series of themes that councillors presented to Lederman a few weeks ago.

Lederman said he is proposing the judicial inquiry could take about a year, but he cautioned “it is really just an outside estimate without knowing, without having a discussion with the judicial officer that is selected to conduct the judicial investigation. Hard to say it will be one year.”

Judicial inquiries can last longer than expected depending upon the issues the inquiry follows, Lederman told councillors earlier. For example the Toronto leasing inquiry cost $19 million over three and a half years ending 2005 and made 241 recommendations.

The $7 million will be taken from the city’s tax stabilization reserve. City officials say it is “unknown” how much the judicial inquiry will cost.

He said a judge is expected to be appointed, possibly 10 days after the terms of references are provided to the Chief Justice of the Superior Court of Ontario. Lederman said he will submit the terms of reference once council approves them April 24.

“We hope to start it as soon as possible,” said Lederman.

He said the city wants the inquiry to be held in Hamilton, at a location that is accessible to the public, and to be broadcast by the media.